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s vision | Nevada Senior Guide

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September is Healthy Aging Month, making it an ideal time to shed some light on an important issue that impacts millions as we age – our eyesight. With around 1.75 million people in the country having age-related macular degeneration, according to the National Institutes of Health, and another 2.2 million suffering from glaucoma, vision is a crucial issue as we age. The good news is that there are things you can do in order to help your eyes age healthily.

“Healthy eyesight is one of those things that people don’t pay much attention to until there is a problem,” explains Dr. Edward Kondrot, founder of the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center. “Ideally, it’s best to take measures to avoid those problems. Many of the problems people have with their vision as they age can be avoided, and even reversed.”

Regardless of one’s age, it is never too early or too late to do things to maintain healthy eyes. Here are 5 tips for doing just that:

  1. Be proactive. Those who do nothing to protect their vision may find they have problems as they age. Just like being proactive to have a healthy heart or mind, it is important to make healthy vision a priority. This means purposely including healthy vision measures in your lifestyle.
  2. Eat healthy foods. Diet plays an important role in maintaining one’s vision. It is important to eat plenty of antioxidant-loaded fruits and vegetables. They are nutritional powerhouses that will help to protect the eyes. Also, it is crucial to opt for organic foods, so that your body does not take in all the harmful chemicals. Those chemicals provide a toxic overload, which impacts the eyes, as well as the rest of the body.
  3. Stay hydrated. Many people who have eye problems are also dehydrated. Staying hydrated is essential to maintaining good eye health. Start each morning with a full glass of room-temperature water. Drinking things like tea and coffee do not count. Add a little lemon if you prefer, which will also help to flush toxins.
  4. Watch the shades. Millions of people have taken to wearing sunglasses, but may not be choosing ones that actually protect their eyes. Worse yet, they may choose some that actually weaken them. Dark sunglasses are not necessarily a good choice, as many may believe. When selecting sunglasses be sure to opt for those that block ultraviolet A and B light to really offer your eye protection.
  5. Reduce eye stress. People stress their eyes in ways that they are not even aware of, such as sleeping in a room that has a night light, or light coming from an alarm clock or another room. Another way people stress their eyes is to watch television in a dark room. Both of these things can provide unnecessary stress that can cause damage over time.

“Healthy aging of the eyes can be done and is being done by millions,” adds Dr. Kondrot. “It comes down to being aware of what will help and harm the eyes and then taking measures to do what will benefit them in the long run.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, Fla. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

Sometimes Little Things Can Be Huge!

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

By Thair Phillips, President, RetireSafe

A small and relatively new product is making life easier for older Americans. It’s a simple thing, but unit dose laundry detergent packs (or pods) are helping seniors perform necessary laundry chores that they might not otherwise be able to do without help. The laundry packs’ small size and pre-measured, consistent content is perfect for aging hands and eyes. With ten thousand of our fellow Americans reaching the age of 65 each day, it’s a really big deal!

While younger Americans can choose from many options, the pods are a huge help to the frail and the disabled.  Consider those who suffer from arthritis, for example. According to 2007-2009 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an estimated 50 million adults have self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis. That number is expected to grow to 67 million by the year 2030, per NHIS data. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, negatively impacting function and mobility for millions of senior citizens. The laundry pods meet the need created by those who can no longer heft a jug of detergent and pour it into a measuring cup. The small (but not too small to handle) size detergent pod fits the bill for aging-in-place seniors who wish to remain self-reliant.

And then there are those who must struggle each and every day with impaired vision.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals over the age of 65 accounts for roughly 30 percent of the U.S. population considered to be visually impaired. Dimming eyesight can reduce physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being.  Doing the laundry can be a chore for all of us, but trying to measure the exact amount of liquid or powder for the person who is vision impaired can be a laundry room disaster resulting in ruined clothes and dangerous messes. For age-in-place seniors with cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and/or diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that causes visual impairment, anything that can help simplify the laundry measuring process is truly a godsend.

Keep in mind that many older Americans in single family homes and apartments may well have to take their laundry and laundry supplies to a communal laundry room or a Laundromat.  Having the convenience of smaller, self-contained detergent pods to carry instead jugs of liquids and large boxes of powder is a big advantage for the elderly.  This is especially true for those navigating with canes or walkers, or those needing to keep one hand free for stability.

In short, pre-measured laundry detergent packs or pods are critical innovations for seniors. This is one small-sized product with a huge functional impact for seniors. In an aging America, we need every one of these impactful products, and many, many more.

RetireSafe is a nationwide organization of 4000,000 supporters that advocates on behalf of seniors on issues regarding Social Security, Medicare, health and financial well-being.

Contact Thair Phillips, (202) 628-5095

Top Five Tips To Save Your Vision: EyeCare America Encourages Prevention and Early Detection

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Many people take their vision for granted, but what if you lost your peripheral vision, developed a black spot in the center of your visual field, or even went blind altogether?  For more than 4.2 million Americans living with serious vision loss or blindness,  these and other vision challenges can make it difficult to enjoy life’s simple pleasures such as reading, playing cards, or watching grandchildren grow. Vision loss can also make it difficult to live independently, work, or drive. That’s why it is so important to prevent eye disease and vision loss whenever possible.

Often, preventive care and lifestyle choices can help keep your vision healthy. Ophthalmologists – eye physicians and surgeons – encourage seniors to follow these top five tips to safeguard vision:

  1. Get an eye exam. To protect healthy vision, seniors age 65 and older should have a dilated eye exam every 1-2 years, or as recommended by their ophthalmologist. Visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for an eye exam at no out-of-pocket cost with one of EyeCare America’s volunteer ophthalmologists.
  2. Know your family history. Eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma can run in families, so it’s important to know your family’s history of eye disease and talk to your ophthalmologist about any possible genetic risk factors.
  3. Don’t smoke. Tobacco smoking is directly linked to many adverse health effects, including cataracts and AMD. Studies show that current smokers and ex-smokers are more likely to develop AMD than people who have never smoked.
  4. Eat right. A variety of vegetables, especially leafy green ones, are an important part of an eye-healthy diet. Researchers have found people on diets with higher levels of vitamins C and E, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA are less likely to develop early and advanced AMD. For delicious recipes that incorporate these essential nutrients, EyeCare America offers a free, downloadable cookbook, called Feast Your Eyes on This.
  5. Protect your eyes from injuries. An estimated 2.5 million eye injuries occur in the U.S. each year, so it is critical to wear proper eye protection to prevent eye injuries, especially during home projects like gardening and cleaning. Eye injuries can also be prevented by securing loose rugs, railings, or other hazards that could cause falls or slips.

Seniors age 65 and older are at the greatest risk for eye disease and vision loss, and because diseases like AMD and glaucoma often have no early symptoms, comprehensive eye exams are especially important. EyeCare America provides care at no out-of-pocket cost to seniors age 65 and older through its corps of volunteer ophthalmologists across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

EyeCare America is designed for people who:

  • Are U.S. citizens or legal residents;
  • Are age 65 and older;
  • Have not seen an ophthalmologist in three or more years; and,
  • Do not receive eye care through an HMO or the VA.

To see if you or a loved one age 65 or older is eligible, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc., with additional support provided by Alcon. The program is endorsed by state and subspecialty ophthalmological societies.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people.  More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Ophthalmologists Offer Sight-Saving Eye Care to Prevent Blindness

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

EyeCare America promotes vision loss prevention in U.S. through no out of pocket-cost eye exams and care

According to the World Health Organization, nearly 180 million people suffer from blindness or visual impairment globally, yet 75 percent of blindness could be prevented or treated with sight-saving eye care. In observance of World Blindness Awareness Month, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, urges the public to make eye exams and care a top priority to maintain their healthy vision.

A variety of problems are responsible for blindness around the world, and the leading causes of blindness and vision loss in the United States are age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. More than two-thirds of visually impaired adults in the U.S. are age 65 or older. The number of Americans with age-related eye disease is expected to double within the next three decades unless something is done to reverse the trend.

To better prevent blindness in the U.S., EyeCare America encourages seniors to visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if they qualify for an eye exam and up to one year of care at no out-of-pocket cost. EyeCare America matches eligible patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – who will provide a comprehensive medical eye examination.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

EyeCare America is made possible through the generous support of the Knights Templar Foundation, Genentech and Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.

September 24, 2012 by · Comments Off on Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

American Academy of Ophthalmology Urges Seniors to Save their Sight through Prevention and Early Detection

Blindness and vision impairment are on the rise in the United States. A recent report by Prevent Blindness America indicates that, since the year 2000, incidence of blindness and vision impairment has increased by 23 percent among Americans age 40 and older.[i] However, most blindness in this country is preventable with proper eye care. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and EyeCare America urge Americans to get regular eye exams to better prevent and detect sight-stealing eye diseases.

Rising rates of age-related eye diseases and conditions are largely to blame for the increase in vision loss. Four of the most common causes of vision loss are diabetic retinopathy, where blood vessels in the retina swell or become blocked due to diabetes; age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a breakdown of the eye’s macula; glaucoma, an eye disease that damages the optic nerve; and cataracts, in which the eye’s lens becomes clouded. These conditions have shown a marked increase over the past 12 years:
• The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy increased by 89 percent.
• The frequency of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) increased by 25 percent.
• The incidence of glaucoma increased by 22 percent.
• The number of people affected by cataracts increased by 19 percent.[ii]
As baby-boomers continue to age, the incidence of age-related eye disease is also expected to continue to increase. Currently, people age 80 and older constitute only 8 percent of the population, but account for 69 percent of all cases of blindness.[iii] Early detection and treatment by an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – may help prevent and in some cases, such as cataracts, even reverse vision loss.

Many seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out-of-pocket-cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. EyeCare America matches qualifying patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist who provides a comprehensive medical eye examination. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc, with additional support from Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

To learn more about EyeCare America or to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for the program, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. Learn more about eye diseases and conditions, and keeping your eyes healthy at www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® public education program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision, by providing the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. Visit www.geteyesmart.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

August 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Cataract Rates are on the Rise in Americans Age 40 and Older

American Academy of Ophthalmology Offers Tips for Cataract Detection and Treatment

SAN FRANCISCO – August 16, 2012 – The incidence of cataracts in the U.S. has risen 19 percent since 2000, impacting nearly 25 million Americans age 40 and older.[i] In fact, more than half of all Americans will develop cataracts by age 80, according to Prevent Blindness America’s Vision Problems in the U.S. report. In response, the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart program is educating the public about cataract risk factors, detection and treatment options during Cataract Awareness Month.

Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens, which can make it more difficult to focus light onto the eye’s retina – the light-sensitive tissue that sends images to the brain. Cataracts, a natural part of aging, are the most common cause of vision loss in the U.S. They typically develop slowly, so symptoms may not be immediately apparent. Over time, cataracts can cause vision to become blurry, cloudy, dull, or dim, and can interfere with daily activities.

The good news is that cataracts are almost always treatable with cataract surgery. During cataract surgery, an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor with the training and certification to provide the full range of eye care and surgery – removes the eye’s cloudy natural lens and replaces it with a clear artificial lens implant called an intraocular lens (IOL). Cataract surgery is often performed as an outpatient procedure and does not require an overnight hospital stay. Cataract surgery is one of the safest types of surgery, and 90 percent of patients who have cataract surgery enjoy better vision afterward.[ii]

“If you notice vision changes, cataracts could be to blame and you might need more than a new pair of glasses,” said David F. Chang, M.D., a clinical correspondent for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and a clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “If you do have a cataract, you should be reassured that it is a normal aging change and not an eye disease. Cataract surgery usually carries an excellent prognosis, and you should talk to your ophthalmologist about whether surgery should be done to restore your eyesight.”

As the aging population grows, it is increasingly important for seniors and their caregivers to understand cataract risks, symptoms, prevention, and treatment options. The American Academy of ophthalmology recommends the following tips to maintain healthy vision:
• Get a baseline exam by age 40. All adults should get a baseline eye exam by age 40 when early signs of eye disease and vision changes may start to occur. During this visit, your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) will advise you on how often to have follow-up exams.
• After age 65, schedule regular eye exams. Anyone age 65 and older should visit an ophthalmologist regularly to detect eye diseases and conditions like cataract early, and to monitor any vision loss. Seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out of pocket cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of American Academy of Ophthalmology. See if you qualify at www.eyecareamerica.org.
• Know your risk factors for cataract. Diabetes, smoking, extensive UV exposure, serious eye injuries, steroid use, and a family history of cataract can increase your risk for developing a cataract.
• Reduce your risks to prevent or delay the onset of cataracts. Use sunglasses and hats to protect your eyes from UV damage. Don’t smoke. If you have diabetes, control your blood sugar carefully through diet, exercise and medications if needed.
• Talk to your ophthalmologist about your treatment options. Vision loss from cataracts can interfere with daily activities. Talk to your ophthalmologist about whether cataract surgery is right for you. When preparing for surgery, give your doctor your complete medical and eye health history, including a list of medications that you have taken. Some medications can cause the iris to move out of its normal position and may require your ophthalmologist to adjust his or her surgical technique.

For more information on cataract symptoms, risk factors, surgery, and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

About EyeSmart
The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Southwest Medical

November 5, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

http://www.smalv.com/

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About Us

YESTERDAY Southwest Medical Associates (SMA)  traces its beginnings back to 1972, when Anthony M. Marlon, MD first established  a private medical practice in Las Vegas. His goal? To provide compassionate and  innovative health care services. Because of his vision, his small practice  quickly grew. Today, we’re one of Nevada’s largest multispecialty medical  groups. And, although we’ve grown, we haven’t lost sight of our original  commitment –  to provide our patients with comprehensive, affordable  medical care.

AND TODAY We’re dedicated to providing you with the  best health care possible. Our advanced technological capabilities and  state-of-the-art equipment, combined with our passion for people, makes us the  right choice for you and your family. With decades of experience and over 13  specialties and programs, SMA is the trusted name in health care in the Las  Vegas Valley.

Our Community

SERVICE. KNOWLEDGE. COMMITMENT. We  have a long history of community service and philanthropy.     Whether it’s in collaboration with the Boy Scouts of America, the  College of Southern Nevada Foundation, the Human Rights Campaign, the March of  Dimes and the United Way, or through our employees, we’re helping individuals,  families and communities live healthier lives.

By giving our  time, talents and financial resources, we hope to advance health, education and  well-being.

Our Volunteer  Program offers the opportunity to learn about the medical field or give back to  the community while helping someone in need.

University of  Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) School of Nursing Grant will be used to fund two  graduate fellowships in the Master of Nursing (MSN) program and two graduate  fellowships in the Doctor of Nursing (Ph.D.) program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Siena Hills – Henderson

www.sienahills.com

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Assisted Living Las Vegas

Siena Hills Assisted Living in Las Vegas offers Independent Living, Assisted Living, Memory Care and Alzheimer’s Care.  Our staff is available 24 hours a day. Life at Siena Hills is comparable to living in a fine resort, with many of the same lifestyle enhancing amenities.

Independent Living & Assisted Living.

At Siena Hills, we strive to meet the needs of each Resident by providing an individualized care program that maintains each Resident’s privacy and dignity. Our health care services    are provided 24 hours a day and change according to your personal needs.

Reputation, Experience & Leadership.

Siena Hills’ unparalleled reputation in the community is fostered by our Executive Director, Mary Pophal. Mary has nearly twenty years of leadership experience in assisted living and memory care. Our residents and families benefit from Mary’s vision and knowledge.

Siena Hills

Active Assisted Living & Memory Care Community

Located in Henderson at
2910 Horizon Ridge Pkwy
702-614-8733

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!