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U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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WestCare Foundation Announces Expanded Veterans Programs

(Las Vegas) – WestCare, a community-based nonprofit providing responsive human services and behavioral health care programs for four decades, announced today that it has expanded its Veterans’ services.

WestCare, founded in Las Vegas 40 years ago, serves approximately 5,000 veterans throughout the United States annually.  America’s returning warriors often face health challenges including substance abuse and mental health disorders, identified as this generation’s “invisible wounds of war.”   Among them are post traumatic stress, brain injury, sexual trauma, anxiety and depression.  Episodes of homelessness, unemployment, and criminal justice involvement are not uncommon among our Veterans.

“These challenges present opportunities for community organizations, led by specially trained, qualified and informed staff, to assist with issues such as social isolation, domestic violence, reintegration and transition, and other problems a Veteran, as well as Veteran family members, may be experiencing,” said veteran and Director of Veteran Services, Dan Bernal. “WestCare is committed to helping Veterans and military family members live positive, productive and healthy lives.”

WestCare’s expanded programs are aimed at addressing a broad range of issues for Veterans and their families through services that  include: treatment for substance abuse and mental health disorders with gender or youth-specific services as appropriate, HIV/AIDS-specific programs, assistance to homelessness  including transitional shelters and permanent housing projects, family counseling, community reintegration, assistance to those who are justice involved, educational and vocational programs for both youth and adults, and case management.

From the top down, starting with WestCare’s President and Vietnam Veteran, Richard Steinberg, more than 10 percent of WestCare’s leadership and staff are Veterans and members of military families. The organization has a deep understanding of military culture at every level and in every program.  “Serving those who have served” is more than a slogan at WestCare.

Since the organization’s inception, Veterans have been welcomed into WestCare programs.  Today, the expanding reach of Veteran-specific programs is aimed at extending services to the men and women who deserve respect for their service, understanding of where they have been and opportunities for their future.

WestCare

WestCare, whose mission “uplifting of the human spirit,” was founded 40 years ago in Las Vegas.  Since its inception, it has grown to more than 100 locations in 16 U.S. States, the US Virgin Islands and the Pacific Islands headquartered in Guam.  The non-profit organization has a variety of programs available in each of the communities it serves.   For more information on the WestCare Foundation and its mission, visit www.WestCare.com.

VETERANS VILLAGE LAS VEGAS OFFERS EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seeks Food Pantry and Water Donations; Open on July 4

 

WHAT:           Due to food and water shortage, Veterans Village, a temporary housing facility for vets that also offers a comprehensive roster of services to help vets heal and succeed – invites the community to donate bottled water and canned food items to provide relief to veterans and individuals in need.

 

Particularly during the extreme heat of the summer, Veterans Village is running low on supplies as they shelter vets and their families seeking respite from the heat.

                       

                        Veterans Village remains open on July 4 to shelter veterans, serve the community and  accept donations.

 

WHERE:         Veterans Village Las Vegas

                        1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South

                        Las Vegas, Nevada 89104

 

                       

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org.

Senior Citizens and Pets by Kay Catlett

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As baby-boomer pet parents reach retirement age it is common to think about  putting aside the dog collars, pet clothing and dog harnesses and retire from  being pet parents. This is especially common as a beloved pet may die. The usual  questions of a grieving pet owner are magnified by older pet owners. The only  real questions with younger owners concerns whether or not they miss the joy of  pet ownership and whether they still possess the desire to take on the  responsibility of another pet. As the pet parent ages, more questions have to be  asked. The age and health of the human along with whether or not the needs of  particular pets can be managed are the most important questions for aging pet  parents.

The primary question concerns whether or not a pet is beneficial for aging  people.

Many seniors crave and miss nurturing. Often, a lifetime of nurturing has  defined a person, first as a parent, friend, spouse or grandparent. With  children and grandchildren growing older, nurturing may no longer required on a  personal basis. Senior citizens may find the circle of friends narrowing as  interests change, people retire and move, and activities lessen. Having a pet to  nurture, and providing that pet with food, comfort, exercise, toys, play and  companionship can fill the void in a changing life.

As the years pass, people may find their lives boring and lonely. Having a  pet cat or dog can fill this void. Taking care of a pet can provide meaning and  provide positive feelings of caring for another being. A pet can provide  structure missed by people following the routine of working outside of the home.  Caring for a pet provides some structure: time to eat, time to play and go  outside, time to be combed, time for naps. At the same time, the pet parent has  a role: to take care of the pet. This sense of responsibility provides structure  as well as a sense of being needed.

Another plus for seniors to have dogs, is for the protection a dog can give.  Seniors are often prey for intruders since the resistance of a senior citizen is  perceived as being lower and often it is known that there are less people living  in the home. However with a dog, the fear of barking or being bitten inhibit the  activities of intruders to that home. Research shows that homes with barking  dogs are violated fewer times than homes without dogs. Dogs provide safety to  seniors.

Another benefit of a senior owning a dog is that it makes them more active.  Owning a dog will compel the senior to live a more active lifestyle then if they  are by themselves. The dog will need to go outside to use the bathroom; feeding  and grooming must take place. These simple activities will give the owner  exercise. Matching the activity needs of the pet to the activity level of the  owner is an important factor to consider in deciding what kind of pet or breed  is best for both the senior and the pet.

Aging pet parents need to think about the future of their pets as time goes  on. A plan for pet care should be arranged so that if a hospitalization is  necessary, or a period of recovery in the home should occur, the needs of the  pets need to be met in those circumstances. Pet care in the home of another,  kennel care or acquiring the assistance of others to provide assistance in the  home are all necessary elements of a pet care plan. Pet parents of every age,  but especially senior citizens need to investigate alternatives in the dire case  of having to give up the pet. This author strongly suggests that “no-kill” pet  shelters need to be listed in the plan in the direst situations.

Overall, a senior owning a pet is an excellent idea. Dogs and cats provide  excellent companions and safety to senior citizens. Studies show that seniors  with pets are happier and live longer then seniors without pets. Preparing the  home properly with crates, dog collars, cat harnesses and pet beds coupled with  preparing plans for all contingencies will make for happy seniors and their  happy pets.

Kay Catlett [http://www.PetCollarStoreAndMore.com]

I believe that as we are humane to our pets, they make us more human. My  online pet store has carefully selected products at competitive prices.

I welcome your input on what products you like and want me to  carry.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kay_Catlett

 

Veterans Village Collaborates with Heaven Can Wait Animal Society

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Veterans to pilot dog adoption program 

 

WHAT:                 VeteransVillageLas Vegas, a comprehensive housing and resource facility for U.S. veterans and their families, is collaborating with Heaven Can Wait Animal Society (HCWAS) Las Vegas.  Two veterans will pilot a dog adoption program by volunteering to assume responsibility for the care of a dog while staying at the facility.  When they leave, veterans can opt to adopt the dog permanently at no charge.  The plan is to expand the program so that more veterans will enjoy the opportunity to have a loving companion, while helping to save dogs’ lives by giving them a safe home at VeteransVillage.

 

WHEN:                 Two veterans will officially adopt their dogs on Thursday, March 14 at 10 a.m.

Other dogs will be onsite to meet potential veteran owners to be considered for future adoption.

 

WHERE:               Veterans Village Las Vegas, 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard South

 

DETAILS:              Veterans are responsible for keeping their dog active, grooming, ensuring the dog is fed and, crated when left alone. HCWAS will properly train the dogs, provide food, treats and toys as well as assume financial responsibility for all veterinarian visits.  HCWAS will also train veteran residents how to properly care for their animal.

 

HCWAS offers many other services for animals in the Las Vegas area. In addition to finding safe homes for animals, HCWAS focuses its attention on eliminating companion animal suffering and pet overpopulation through spay/neuter, adoptions, community outreach programs and education. By pairing with Veteran’s Village, HCWAS hopes to reach its projected goals of better educating adults on the importance of spay/neuter for their pet and eliminating the killing of more than 30,000 cats and dogs annually in Las Vegas.

 

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About Heaven Can Wait Animal Society

Heaven Can Wait Animal Society, a non-profit 501 (c)(3) animal humane organization, was formed in 2000 by a group of 5 concerned citizens with the idea of building a beautiful 20 acre sanctuary to house all of the unwanted animals in our community.  In the meantime, though, animals were and still are dying at rate of around 30,000 per year in our local shelters with even more just dying in the streets.  Therefore, we decided to refocus our efforts slightly away from rescue and more toward promoting spay/neuter as the solution to the tragic pet overpopulation problem here in Las Vegas.www.hcws.org

Hilton Worldwide Has Directed All Their Hotels To Install Smoking Shelters

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

A Handi-Hut smoking shelter installed at Hilton Worldwide headquarters was used to define the directive. Smoking shelters comply with the law without imposing a total smoking ban. The prefabricated sections are easily installed with options for designs, size, color, HVAC and lighting.

Pertinent excerpts from the directive are:
1. All existing hotels currently operating with a 100% non-smoking policy must comply.
2. Provide a covered smoking shelter away from all entrances or porte cochere.
3. Provide a freestanding prefabricated metal structure, minimum 6′ x 10′.
4. Notify guests of smoke free environment.
5. All structures must be at least 25′ from any entrance, operable window or air intake vent, with exception of recessed alcoves.

Smoker’s rights vs. non-smoker’s rights. For many, it is a civil liberties issue. Others regard it a health issue.

Many employers and business owners are finding that accommodating both the smoker and non-smoker is more than just fair, its good business. Workplaces that don’t offer a designated smoking area have reported a substantial loss of productivity. Also, their entranceways are crowded with smokers and littered with cigarette butts.

Handi-Hut developed a practical solution to accommodate smokers so that public spaces can remain smoke-free. They have been designing and manufacturing outdoor glass and aluminum shelters for train stations and bus stops for more than 40 years.

The company expanded to include the manufacture of state-of-the-art smoking shelters. Thousands of companies, universities, hospitals, federal government offices and municipalities have opted for these economical, easy-to-assemble shelters.

Handi-Hut smoking shelters are a quick and affordable way to accommodate smokers and non-smokers and help business owners comply with the law without a total smoking ban.
Handi-Hut, Inc. is veteran-owned and a GSA Premier Provider, certified by the U.S. General Services Administrations (GSA) as a top-tier vendor of multi-purpose modular shelters.

Go to Handi-Hut.com to learn more about the configurations and pricing of Handi-Hut smoking shelters, or call John Cozza at 1-800-603-6635 x 212.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!