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sierra | Nevada Senior Guide

Part Four: Current and Future Anti-Aging Treatments

May 1, 2016 by · Comments Off on Part Four: Current and Future Anti-Aging Treatments
Filed under: General 

As previously noted, many anti-oxidants are essential nutrients. Natural anti-oxidants, like vitamin C and E, work synergistically. Anti-oxidants may be more effective if obtained from a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. Nutritionists recommend eating 6 or more daily servings of anti-oxidant rich fruits and vegetables. Everyone agrees the use of antioxidant supplements for anti-aging may be helpful, but there is no agreement on what the most effective supplement dosages should be.

Anti-aging medicine acknowledges that stress of all kinds causes aging but has not yet developed individualized treatment for this. There are countless sources of internal and external stress and individual stress levels vary greatly. One overlooked cause of internal stress is improper hydration. Water is essential in for the correct operation of many internal functions. Too little or too much water causes age producing stress. When one is old (80+) thirst perception declines and dehydration can easily set in. Other overlooked sources of stress are antioxidants themselves. High doses (or doses above certain yet unspecified amounts) of supplemental anti-oxidants are a known cause of stress.

To be helpful, antioxidant supplements must prevent other types of stress more than the stress they themselves create. Knowing the correct supplement dosages that can do this is an essential part of anti-aging treatment. A healthy young person in his twenties, who is properly nourished, will have less internal stress that an older individual in his sixties. For a young individual, lower amounts of antioxidants may be safer than higher amounts. A older person, whose many internal homeostatic mechanisms are less able to deal with internal stress, may benefit more from higher amounts of antioxidants. Theoretically an anti-oxidant based course of anti-ageing treatment will slow the rate at which cellular damage occurs. Cells will become “sick” more slowly. Over time, as fewer sick cells are replaced at a slower rate, the number of cells retaining longer telomere chains will be higher. You can then reasonably expect this to result in an increase in life expectancy. For now the recommended but imprecise approach to decrease the rate at which cellular damage occurs is to increase your per day intake of anti-oxidant rich fruits and vegetables, to slightly increase your intake of antioxidants, and to take various vitamins and small amounts of anti-aging supplements on a daily basis. One study has shown taking a good multivitamin supplement is associated with longer telomere length.

Ideally anti-aging treatment should to be fine tuned for each individual. The key here would be to measure and minimize the cumulative effects of different kinds of stress on an individual basis. Easily measurable practical bio-markers for various types of stress do not yet exist or are not being used. When they are used it will be easy to customize individual antioxidant dosages so that everyone have “optimum” levels throughout their life. “Optimum” levels would maintain a safe reserve of protective antioxidants in the body.

Next I will briefly discuss the most popular nutrients associated with anti-aging. The most popular of the anti-oxidants, vitamins, and nutrients often associated with good health and anti-aging include: beta-carotene (vitamin A), vitamin C, vitamin E, various Flavonoids,Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, Co-enzyme Q10, Lycopene, Selenium.

There are dozens of supplements that are known to effectively treat specific symptoms of old age. A few of the better known supplements include: DMAE, Acetyl-l-carnitine, L-carnosine, Alpha Lipoic Acid, DHEA, L-arginine, and melatonin

Good food contains some of the anti-oxidants previously mentioned. A few other popular foods associated with anti-aging include: Green Tea, turmeric, and red wine.

All of the above have unique biological properties and, in my opinion, are “good” for you if taken in small or moderate amounts. Some (ex. vitamin C) may also be “good” for you in larger amounts. Various studies on each of these may conflict with each other. You need to carefully research each substance on your own but researchers have already found several nutrients to be associated with longer than average telomere lengths. These include: Green Tea, Omega-3, Vitamins A, C, D, and E.

Vitamin E has been associated with telomere lengthening anti-aging properties.

Green tea contains many antioxidants, including vitamin C, E and flavenoids.Flavenoids form a large antioxidant class (including catechins and quercetin) that has many anticarcinogenic, antihypercholesterolemic, antibacterial, (helps prevent dental caries), and anti-inflammatory properties. The leaves of the tea plant are rich in polyphenols. The consumption of 3 cups or more of green tea daily has been associated with longer than average telomere length.

The Omega-3s are essential long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids that are anti-inflammatory and help prevent heart disease, stroke, memory loss, depression, arthritis, cataract, cancer. Omega-3s slow down the shortening of telomeres; i.e. they may protect against aging on a cellular level.

Vitamin C is an abundant internal water soluble antioxidant that protects cellular components against free-radical formation caused by pollution and cigarette smoke. Many studies have associated high vitamin C intakes with lower rates of cancer of the mouth, larynx and esophagus. Vitamin C has shown promise in treating premature aging and possibly aging itself.

Due to limitations on the number of links I can incorporate into this article I could not provide more reference links supporting the preceding paragraphs. If interested please email me at the email address shown at the end of this article and I will forward them to you.

The sooner you start some sort of anti-aging treatment the better but it is never too late to start. All real treatments will help you maintain a longer than average average telomere chain length.

The goal of the programmed death theory of aging is to address the root causes of aging. This goal includes attempts to slow or reverse the telomere shortening process. Two such treatments are: TA 65 and human genetic engineering.

TA 65 is a telomerase activating product produced and marketed by Sierra Sciences. The key ingredient in TA 65 is Astragalus, a plant extract known to have telomerase activation properties. The product may work but I do not recommend it for several reasons. TA 65 is too expensive for the average person. A number of expensive health spas incorporate TA 65 in their programs. Again these are financially beyond the reach of the average person. The marketing tactics of Sierra Sciences have been questioned by many and there are law suits pending against TA 65.

The big issue I have with TA 65 is one of scientific honesty. The company genetically engineered mice that allowed telomerase to be switched off and on at an early age. TA 65 was able to switch telomerase back on in these mice and allowed them to live normal lives. http://www.nature.com/news/2010/101128/full/news.2010.635.html

Using this to show how effective TA65 treatment is, is dishonest. This is not how telomerase normally works and there was no real extension of the lifespan beyond what it would have been without the genetic modification. In normal mice the effects of TA65 were temporary and little or no life extension was seen. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/04/11/anti-aging-pill-new-study-on-ta-65-sparks-controversy.html

Human genetic engineering is the real answer to fighting and defeating aging. It can directly address the root causes of aging. Advances in this area (ex. CRISPR) allow DNA base pairs to be inserted or deleted at specific place in our DNA. This means the human genome can now be precisely edited as needed. The lifespan of old mice has been modestly increased using telomerase gene therapy. In humans gene modification therapy has frequently been used for various medical problems. On September 15, 2015, Elizabeth Parrish was the first human to undergo anti-aging gene therapy. Anti-aging treatments will rapidly advance as our knowledge of the specifics of the human genome grows.

Current general social-political attitudes seem to be favoring the further development of anti-aging research. There are no international recognized political programs to stop aging or extend life but since 2012 a few pro-immortality political parties have sprung up. Their aim is to support anti-aging and life extension research, and to help provide access to advances in these areas to everyone. Among the numerous organizations supporting anti-aging research, the SENS (Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence) organization has come up with an anti-aging research plan. They want to develop anti-aging therapies to repair most forms of cellular damage. SENS, is a charitable organization. Any anti-aging advances resulting from funding it provides will become readily available public knowledge. In addition to the normal scientific research there is the $1,000,00 Palo Alto Longevity Prize that is being offered to anyone who can come up with an effective anti-aging treatment.

As of 2015, all known anti-aging treatments are only partially effective. Depending on when one starts a comprehensive anti-aging program, one can probably extend one’s life by 10 to 25 years. Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health estimated that an anti-aging lifestyle can add 24.6 more productive years to one’s lifespan. Anti-aging knowledge increases at a rate of about 10 times every 10 years. This probably means that for many of us there is more than enough time to reap the anticipated benefits in anti-aging research. One day soon, aging, like many other diseases, will be cured. While we wait for those anti-aging technological singularities to occur the name of the game is to ensure we stay healthy long enough repeat their benefits.

As a former engineer I have a strong affinity to all sciences including biology.

My interests include following advances in the fields of anti-aging, health and nutrition. Rapid advances in these areas will vanquish the disease we call aging.
Through my articles and website I want to help you maintain your good health for the next 10 to 25 years. I believe this can be done by a daily program that includes moderate exercise, a healthy diet that includes vitamins and related supplements, and taking advantage of any advances in related research. My hope is that within the next 25 years or less, the fruits of anti-aging research will become available to everyone.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9239681

Northern Nevada Medical Center Announces New CEO, Alan Olive

Northern Nevada Medical Center Announces New CEO, Alan Olive

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(Sparks, NV) Northern Nevada Medical Center welcomes Alan Olive, MPH, MHA, as new CEO for the 108-bed hospital in Sparks, NV.

Born and raised in Reno, Olive has 19 years of healthcare leadership experience. He has served as CEO at northern Nevada hospitals including Carson Tahoe’s Sierra Surgical Hospital in Carson City and Renown South Meadows Medical Center in south Reno. He was also previously an executive with Providence Health and Services, based in Portland, Ore, and MountainView Hospital in Las Vegas, NV.

“Alan is an experienced health care professional with expertise in integrated health systems, project management, health plan partnerships, hospital operations, and physician relations,” said Karla Perez, Regional Vice President for Acute Care at Universal Health Services. “His experience and history in the Reno/Sparks area will greatly benefit Northern Nevada Medical Center and healthcare in the community.”

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Alan earned a Bachelor of Science in Sociology from Brigham Young University and a Master of Public Health – Hospital Administration and Master of Healthcare Administration from Loma Linda University.

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Northern Nevada Medical Center is a 108-bed acute care hospital located in Sparks, Nevada. NNMC’s tradition of providing quality healthcare in a comfortable, accessible environment means peace of mind for the thousands of patients served by the hospital each year.

 

NNMC is the only hospital in Nevada certified by The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as knee replacement, hip replacement and spine surgery. NNMC is also the first program in the nation certified by The Joint Commission in low back pain and is also an Accredited Chest Pain Center by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care. Northern Nevada Medical Center is owned and operated by a subsidiary of Universal Health Services, Inc.(UHS), a King of Prussia, PA-based company, that is one of the largest healthcare management companies in the nation.

Sierra Club Responds to NV Energy Proposal for Retiring Coal Plants

April 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Carson City, Press-Media Releases 

Sierra Club Responds to NV Energy Proposal for Retiring Coal Plants

Coal retirements promising but questions remain on mix of renewables, energy efficiency, and gas

Carson City – A proposal being rolled out by NV Energy today in the state legislature would set new retirement dates for Nevada’s coal plants, including speeding up retirement of the controversial Reid Gardner plant. The legislation also increases new renewable energy and allows NV Energy to build several new gas plants.

In response, the Sierra Club Energy Task Force issued the following statement:

The Sierra Club welcomed news of NV Energy’s intention to retire the Reid Gardner coal plant by 2017 and to end its contract with Navajo Generating Station’s coal-fired power by 2019. The Club also expressed support for adding new renewable energy projects to replace some of the coal power.

“With this legislation, NV Energy unequivocally acknowledges that Nevada wants and needs to leave coal behind. Closing the Reid Gardner coal plant would clean up Nevada’s air pollution and reduce health risks for thousands of Nevadans,” said Jane Feldman, Sierra Club state Energy Task Force chair. “We strongly support closing that plant and fully cleaning up the site, including the polluted lands, air and water near the Moapa Band of Paiutes’ Moapa River Reservation.”

“Replacing that coal power with renewable energy will create jobs for Nevadans and a better future for our children. We are pleased to see additional renewable energy called for in this bill,” said Feldman.

However, Sierra Club said that concerns remain over NV Energy’s proposals to build new natural gas plants and suggested that more emphasis on energy efficiency and renewable energy is needed. “Energy efficiency can put money right back into the pockets of consumers every month,” said Feldman. “And if we build more renewable energy, costs remain stable for decades because the fuel costs for solar, wind and geothermal are free,” she continued.

Sierra Club is continuing to study the bill and will provide detailed input to the legislature as these proposals move forward.

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities are closed Oct. 26 for holiday observance.

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman
Thursday, Oct. 4, 9 to 10 a.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.
Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

Ward 4 Walk & Roll For ALS (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 6 a.m. registration. 5K begins 8 a.m., Walk begins 8:15 a.m.
Cost: $25 minimum donation to participate in walk; $35 for runners ages 18+; $25 runners ages 5-17; free for under age 5.
Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way, at Cheyenne Avenue.
Sign up your team at http://als.kintera.org/WalknRoll. Call (702) 777-0500 for more information.

Ward 2 Trunk or Treat Car Show and Free Kid’s Halloween Festival (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public. There is a fee for vendors and car show participants.
Veterans Memorial Leisure Services Center, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.
Please join Councilman Bob Beers for a fun day filled with music provided by DJ Brando, along with Halloween activities for the kids, including craft projects, costume contest, games, face painting and jump houses. Kids have the opportunity to “trunk or treat” at the cars decorated for Halloween in the car show. Help pick the spookiest! All makes, models and years welcome in the car show. Vendors are welcome. The event is sponsored by Ward 2 Councilman Bob Beers.

Contact John Bear at 229-2420 or e-mail to jbear@lasvegasnevada.gov, if you want to register your car in the show, become a vendor at the event, or volunteer to help. Early registration for the car show is $25 and is due by Thursday, Oct. 4. You also can register a car in the car show on the event date for $35. The vendor fee is $25, which includes a table.
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Free Ward 6 Shredding Event
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle. This is a safe and convenient way to get rid of old documents.

Movie at the E! (all ages)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Enjoy a family movie in the plaza. This will be a perfect chance for the family to relax and enjoy a safe and special night under the stars. Bring low folding chairs for your comfort.

E! Club (ages 6-13)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 per child.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Avenue, (702) 229-1515.
Parents can enjoy a night on the town while children enjoy a fun evening of activities.

Ward 1 Trunk or Treat (all ages)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Anthem Institute Parking Lot, 2320 S. Rancho Drive, at Sahara Avenue.
Enjoy a community celebration with trick-or-treating, jump house and more, hosted by Anthem Institute and co-sponsored by the city of Las Vegas.

Howling Halloween Carnival (all ages)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Doolittle Community Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.
There will be a costume contest, games, drawings and candy for the kids. There will also be a Haunted Hallway designed to frighten all who enter.

Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Tournament
Friday-Sunday, Oct. 26-28.
Free for spectators. Advance registration required for teams.
Bettye Wilson Soccer Complex, 7353 Eugene Ave., and other parks.
For teams ages 8-15. This soccer tournament is co-hosted by the city of Las Vegas and the Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club. This top-ranked event drew teams from 11 different states, as well as Canada and Mexico last year. Teams are guaranteed three games. Individual awards are offered for 1st and 2nd place. The entry fee is only $515 for U8-U10 and $735 for U11-U15. Entry deadline is Sept. 6. For more information, go online to www.lvmayorscup.com.
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Adaptive Recreation

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Wheelchair Athletes Open Gym (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., through December.
Fee: $2 per practice.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Closed Oct. 12, 26.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Adaptive Cycle Club (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 6, 9 to 11 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Cost: $2 per person.
Wayne Bunker Family Park, 7351 W. Alexander Road, at Tenaya Way.
Call (702) 229-4796 to reserve your spot in the early or late session. Adaptive cycles provided.

Helter Skelter Quad Rugby Tournament
Oct. 12-14, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.
Free for spectators.
Dula Gymnasium, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.
Six teams from across North America will compete for medals for first through third place. Teams will include: Las Vegas Sin City Skulls; Northern California Quake; Sierra Strom from Reno/Sacramento; University of Arizona Wildcats; Boise Idaho Bombers; and the Ottawa Stingers from Canada. Spectators are welcome. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for more information.
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20th Annual Disability Awareness Day (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and lunch.
Pioneer Park, 7449 Braswell Drive.
Attend a free “Work Incentives Seminar on Ticket to Work & Employment for SSI/SSDI Beneficiaries Age 14 to 64.” This seminar will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in conjunction with Disability Awareness Day. Also enjoy live entertainment, a free wheelchair safety check and a free lunch. Call (702) 889-4216 to reserve your space.

Free Paralympic Sport Activity Nights (kindergarten-grade 12)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 5 to 8 p.m.
Rancho High School, 1900 Searles Ave.
Register at main school entrance. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for additional information and locations.

Quad Rugby Team Practice (high school-adult)
Friday, Oct. 19, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Minker Sports Complex, 275 N. Mojave Road, (702) 229-6563.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Counseling Services – Northern Nevada

Sierra Behavioral Solutions

639 Isbell Rd., Ste. 380, (775) 348-5800, ext. 0

www.sierrabehavioralsolutions.org

Adult Mental Health, Grief Counseling,
Couples & Family Therapy, Addiction Therapy,                      Caregiver Counseling, Chronic Pain Support

Nevada-Senior-Guide The Bridge – Las Vegas

www.thebridgeatparadisevalley.com

The Bridge

The Bridge of Paradise ValleyRetirement when you want it. Assistance when you need it.Imagine living in a beautiful, peaceful environment, surrounded by friends and activities.

Enjoy an enriching retirement at The Bridge at Paradise Valley

Our community facilities are specifically designed to encourage seniors to live their retirement years as actively and as independently as possible. Assisted Living at The Bridge at Paradise Valley allows seniors to live carefree lifestyles – because we take care of the details! Our services include restaurant-style dining, housekeeping, and apartment maintenance. We are committed to making The Bridge at Paradise Valley a place you will love to call home right here in Las Vegas Nevada!

The Bridge at Paradise Valley features the finest in Assisted Living. With stunning surroundings, outstanding services and an abundance of amenities, our residents are proud to call The Bridge at Paradise Valley home. Independent Living combines community living with the privacy of your own apartment, and Assisted Living offers the same amenities in addition to personalized services. From a dynamic activities schedule to our hospitable staff, our goal is to promote an active, carefree lifestyle.

Our residents enjoy restaurant-style dining, housekeeping services, scheduled transportation, apartment  maintenance and a full calendar of recreational and wellness activities as part of a convenient,  month-to-month lease.  And, from live  entertainment to themed parties and local outings, our events are catered to seniors.

We welcome the opportunity to introduce you to our services  and to show you how The Bridge at Paradise Valley offers a rejuvenating retirement  lifestyle.

The Bridge at Paradise Valley is part of the Century Park family of senior living communities. Headquartered in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Century Park manages senior retirement properties located throughout the   United States.

Discover The Bridge at Paradise Valley

Life at The Bridge at Paradise Valley offers opportunities and advantages that seniors in the Las Vegas region have come to love and want to keep as part of their active lifestyle.

Las Vegas, Nevada, is more than just bright lights and luxury resorts. It is a great place to live. Located at the southern tip of the Sierra Nevadas, Las Vegas was founded by Mormon missionaries in 1902. World class shopping, dining, and entertainment are all easily accessible from The Bridge at Paradise Valley.

There are plenty of activities available to the Assisted Living residents at The Bridge at Paradise Valley. Some of the weekly choices include Bingo, card games, and Wii games. However, there is always time for relaxation, and The Bridge at Paradise Valley’s park-like grounds – which include a gazebo and a picnic area – are the perfect place for a leisurely visit with family or friends.

Senior Care Facility located in Las Vegas Nevada

Outstanding Retirement Services and Amenities

At The Bridge at Paradise Valley, you will discover a truly unique way to live.  We specialize in combining elegant amenities with the comforts of home.  Our outstanding services are offered in an inviting atmosphere where caring, professional staff lavish you with attention while respecting your individuality and privacy.

Facilities

  • Several apartment floor plans to choose from
  • Community dining room
  • Wellness center
  • Cozy lounge with fireplace
  • Beauty salon and barber shop
  • Gift shop
  • Ice cream parlor
  • Library

Services

  • Delicious restaurant-style dining three times each day planned by a registered dietician
  • Daily living assistance including bathing, dressing, and medication management
  • Transportation throughout the week
  • Housekeeping service

Activities

  • Wii games
  • Bingo
  • Restaurant outings
  • Exercise classes
  • Afternoon socials
  • Many other social, recreational, educational programs, and cultural events

Grounds Features

  • Landscaped courtyards with gazebo and picnic area
  • Beautifully maintained grounds perfect for walking

 

 

2205 E. Harmon
L.V. NV 89119
702-369-6964


Assisted living communities offer help with non-medical aspects of daily activities in an atmosphere of separate, private living apartments that encourage independence. In addition to providing meals, transportation for medical appointments, activities and pleasure trips, assisted living provides linens and laundry service, assistance with dressing and bathing, reminders regarding medication, and assistance with eating, transferring to and from a wheelchair, toileting, etc. This group setting also provides daily social activities and entertainment for the residents.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!