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Skilled | Nevada Senior Guide

Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7334746

American Red Cross Advancing Health Options in Southern Nevada

January 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

dr-john-lunettaDr. John Lunetta, D.O. arrived in Las Vegas more than a year ago to help with the American Red Cross Blood Services regional expansion. For decades, the Red Cross blood supply in Southern Nevada came from other areas of the country, mostly from Idaho, Montana and Utah. But over the course of the last year and a half, the team has grown the program of blood collection to that of supplying nine of the area’s 14 hospitals.

 

But Dr. Lunetta’s presence here makes this program so much more than a simple blood collection service. Licensed to practice in seven western states, and eight of our local hospitals, Dr. Lunetta assists local doctors when they have questions about using Red Cross blood products. Transfusion recommendations to find the most compatible blood or questions about reactions to transfusions are all topics on which Dr. Lunetta can speak.

 

Dr. Lunetta also brings with him the latest in patient blood management education. His contemporary approach allows local doctors to, when appropriate; use less product resulting in less risk to patients.

 

But there are additional American Red Cross Blood Services here in Las Vegas not available in some other regions known as clinical services. With the medical equipment and the skilled nurses that work with Dr. Lunetta, Clinical Services can offer one-on-one patient contact delivering care through an apheresis machine, which uses centrifugal force to separate blood into its constituent components. This is a method used in the treatment of leukemia patients, sickle cell patients, and a large number of neurologic and oncology patients. Dr. Lunetta also oversees treatments involving some new technology using extracorporeal photopheresis, or ECP. In layman’s terms, it’s like a tanning bed for your blood.  Due to Dr. Lunetta’s expertise, some area patients will soon be able to receive treatment here that they could only get in California previously.  It’s used to treat patients who suffer from Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in which the skin is attacked by the patient’s own T-cells. The treatment calms those cells down and the skin begins to heal. An average patient needs to receive 150 – 300 procedures once every two weeks.  Another more common use of this treatment is for patients who have graft vs. host disease; usually as a result of a bone marrow transplant, or other organ transplant such as lung or heart.

 

Many more procedures and innovations are in the pipeline that Dr. Lunetta and his staff may be able to offer in the future and the Red Cross is pushing the development of new ways in which Blood Services can help in our community. From his involvement with donors at blood drives to his work with patients who get the blood transfused, Dr. Lunetta is involved every step of the way.

 

Dr. Lunetta is available for interviews for print, online, radio and television. Well-spoken and with a talent to break complex medical ideas down into language that we can all understand, Dr. Lunetta is a delightful guest and talented subject matter expert.

 

To book Dr. Lunetta, or to interview him on his range of expertise, please contact the office of Lloyd Ziel at the contact below.

 

Lloyd Ziel

Public Information Officer | Communications and Public Affairs

 

American Red Cross

Southern Nevada Chapter

1771 E. Flamingo Rd. Suite 206-B

Las Vegas, NV 89119

702-232-6604 cl

702-369-3351 of

702-791-3372 fx

Lloyd.Ziel@redcross.org

www.redcross.org/southernnevada

Keepsakes, Family Heirlooms Passed Down More Effectively with New Legacy Builder Tool Chest from LegacyStories.org

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Allianz American Legacy Studies researchers asked a group of Baby Boomers and their parents to rank on a scale of 1-10 (10 being most) what was more important to them when it comes to passing down an inheritance: values and life lessons or financial assets.

Perhaps not so surprisingly, the results showed that passing down values were over seven times more important than passing down valuables.

Yet only a small fraction of these three generations has made any provisions, mostly due to lack of awareness, education and the tools to do the job properly.

In addition to values and life lessons, a lot more should be included when building and passing down a legacy. Keepsakes and awards often represent defining moments and milestone events and can become family heirlooms when the stories behind their acquisitions are documented.

Identifying people in a select group of vintage family photos is one the best ways to document personal history, as some of the people in the old photos might as well be strangers to grandchildren. Those who grew up in the 20th century were first generations to record special events and moments.

Today’s digital technology offers a chance to pass down a purposeful legacy that will survive the ravages of time, and the experts at LegacyStories.org have developed an innovative Legacy Builder Tool Chest to help.

Consisting of fourteen drawers, each “toolkit” focuses on a specific legacy topic with interactive how-to guidebooks, downloadable forms, video tutorials and lots of helpful resources.

Toolkit topics include “Life Lessons and Values“, “Keepsakes & Heirlooms”, “Vintage Legacy Photos”, and one titled “Loved Ones in Care” to help caregivers build a legacy for victims of Alzheimer’s, people in hospice care, or seniors living in assisted or skilled nursing facilities.

“Since passing down life lessons and values is the highest priority, we provide members the ‘Life Lessons and Values’ toolkit at no cost,” says Tom Cormier, co-founder of LegacyStories.org. “Membership in LegacyStories.org is also free so there are no obstacles to prevent anyone from securing an honored place in family history. They just need to take action before regretting it.”

The Legacy Builder Tool Chest is also being recommended by financial advisors, estate planners and elder law attorneys as a means to engage with their clients in a purposeful way.

Content for the individual toolkits is contributed by top legacy experts including members of The International Assoc. of StoryKeepers (I-ASK) and the Association of Personal Historians (APH).

Our goal is to help people establish themselves as “effective elders” while they are alive, and to become “awesome ancestors” when they pass on,” Cormier states. “Our grandchildren and descendants will one day have an interest in learning about their family history. Because so few people will take the time to document their personal history, those who do will live on forever as their descendants’ go-to awesome ancestor.”

Contact info:
Tom Cormier — Co-founder
Phone: 423-295-5904
Email
Website: www.legacystories.org

Read more news from LegacyStories.org

RENOWN HEALTH WELCOMES 71 NURSE GRADUATES

July 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

RENO, Nev. (July 5, 2013) – Renown Health is excited to welcome 100 new
employees, including 71 local registered nurse (RN) graduates, several
experienced RNs, and 20 more employees in front-line patient care and other
roles. The new hires will meet for their first day of orientation at Renown
Regional Medical Center on Monday, July 8.

“We are pleased that so many of the area’s graduates choose Renown as the
place to build their career. Renown nurses and other healthcare
professionals have a tremendous opportunity to develop skills in multiple
areas. The Renown Health network includes three acute care hospitals, a
rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility and a large physician
practice,” said Michelle Sanchez-Bickley, Vice President Human Resources.
“With the wide range of clinical services we offer at Renown, employees have
a wealth of options to explore.”

As a private employer, Renown has developed programs to train healthcare
professionals and works closely with the university and community colleges
to offer residencies, clinical rotations, mentoring programs and local
faculty. The newly graduated RNs will participate in Renown’s nurse training
programs, which provide clinical support, education and mentoring. According
to Sanchez-Bickley, “Our residency and preceptorship programs are extremely
beneficial for new nurses they transition from the classroom to the
bedside.”

Renown is the region’s largest private employer and according to a recent
report from the Center for Regional Studies at University of Nevada, Reno,
the healthcare sector is a chief driver of western Nevada job growth. In
fact, healthcare employment grew by 9.6 percent over the past five years
while other sectors experienced a decline in jobs.

“We are committed to hiring, developing and retaining local employees,” said
Sanchez-Bickley. “To have a recruitment class of this size is very exciting
for Renown, and I hope for the new employees as well.” In total, Renown
employs 5,200 people and more than 1,400 of those are RNs.

Renown is a strong supporter of regional nursing programs, partnering with
the University of Nevada, Reno Orvis School of Nursing, Truckee Meadows
Community College, Western Nevada College and Carrington College. “Through
these partnerships,” said Sanchez-Bickley, “we are able to strengthen our
community ties, helping to provide education and support to individuals who
are looking to enter into the healthcare industry.”

# # # #

About Renown Health
Renown Health is Reno’s only locally owned, not–for–profit integrated
healthcare network. As the region’s largest private employer with a
workforce of more than 5,000 members, Renown provides more services than all
other local healthcare networks combined. It is comprised of three acute
care hospitals, a rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility, the
largest medical group and urgent care network and the region’s largest and
only locally owned not-for-profit insurance company, Hometown Health. Renown
also carries a long tradition of being the first in the region to
successfully perform the most advanced procedures.

Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center
recently achieved the Pathway to Excellence® designation, becoming the first
and only hospital in Nevada to receive this designation by the American
Nurses Credentialing Center. As a Pathway to Excellence designated
organization, Renown is committed to nurses’ satisfaction.

Civil Air Patrol’s first Spaatz award recipient dies

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Civil Air Patrol’s first Spaatz award recipient dies after distinguished public service career
Decorated CAP cadet from Michigan became a skilled Air Force combat pilot who flew with the Thunderbirds and served as a trusted congressional aide

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. – Douglas C. Roach, the first recipient of Civil Air Patrol’s highest cadet award, the General Carl A. Spaatz Award, died Jan. 11 at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., from complications related to cancer. He was 70.
“The Spaatz Association wishes to express its deep regret and condolences in the passing of Doug Roach,” said retired U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Ted Bowlds, the association’s president. “As the first Spaatz award recipient, Doug certainly set the standard in the qualities represented in all Spaatz recipients that followed. We have him and his family in our thoughts and prayers.”
Roach made Civil Air Patrol and Spaatz history as a Michigan Wing cadet in the 1960s. He was born in Romulus, Mich., on Nov. 18, 1942.
“Doug was handpicked by Jack Sorenson (CAP’s cadet program leader at the time) to be tested for the first Spaatz,” said Col. Larry Trick, a Spaatz recipient and former president of the association. “Jack noticed Doug in 1962 at the National Cadet Competition, where he was commander of the Michigan Wing drill team that won the competition that year.”
Trick said the Spaatz test in its infancy was handwritten, with mostly essay-type questions. Today the test has evolved into a more sophisticated, multi-step process, but the Spaatz award remains the most coveted of CAP’s cadet honors.
Named after the first chief of staff of the Air Force and the first chairman of the CAP National Board, the Spaatz award is presented to cadets who demonstrate excellence in leadership, character, fitness and aerospace education. Cadets typically qualify for the award after devoting an average of five years to progress through 16 achievements in the CAP Cadet Program.
Once a cadet achieves the award, he or she is entitled to the grade of cadet colonel. On average, only two cadets in 1,000 earn the Spaatz award. Since the award’s inception in 1964, CAP has presented the Spaatz award to less than 1,900 cadets.
Roach became a highly decorated officer and skilled U.S. Air Force pilot. After flying 516 combat missions during several tours in Vietnam between 1969 and 1972, he was a pilot with the Air Force flight performance team, the Thunderbirds, from 1973-75. He began with the aerial demonstration team flying Thunderbird #6 when the team flew the F-4 Phantom and he served as the team’s logistics officer. Roach retired from the Air Force with the rank of colonel.
Despite the notoriety he gained above the clouds in the Air Force, Brig. Gen. Richard L. Anderson said Roach was grounded in the achievements of his youth, which included his “place of honor in the annals of CAP history” as the first Spaatz recipient.
“I remember meeting Doug for the first time at a Spaatz Association event soon after the organization was created in the mid-1990s,” said Anderson, past president of the association and former CAP national commander who now chairs the organization’s Board of Governors. “Although Doug’s professional military and congressional staff career precluded his remaining active in CAP, he remained dedicated to the purposes of the CAP Cadet Program and attributed CAP with his later accomplishments in life.”
“He was a hero to me and many cadets in the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s,” said Trick. “Often, we would see him on the Hill during National CAP Legislative Day. He always had a great smile and handshake for the cadets.”
Roach earned a bachelor’s degree in government at the University of Michigan and, after his distinguished service in the Air Force, a master’s degree in national security studies from Georgetown University.
He continued his career of public service on Capitol Hill, most recently as the longtime staff director for the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces.
In his obituary this week, Congressional Quarterly’s Roll Call said Roach was a cornerstone of every defense authorization law since 1991, whether as a professional staff member on the veteran defense panel, or its staff director since 2001.
“His work was key to developing the smart weapons we use today,” said Trick.
The longtime congressional aide also was noted for serving both Democrats and Republicans, working through important national security legislation. In the Roll Call obituary, Rep. Michael R. Turner, the Ohio Republican who chairs the Tactical Air and Land Forces panel, said, “Doug Roach was a trusted counselor to members on both sides of the aisle for many years. He always gave us his best advice, regardless of party interest or agenda.”
Roach’s boss, House Armed Services Committee Chairman Howard “Buck” McKeon, R-Calif., called him “a selfless servant and true hero.”

Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than 61,000 members nationwide, operating a fleet of 550 aircraft. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 80 lives annually. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to nearly 27,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet programs. CAP received the World Peace Prize in 2011 and has been performing missions for America for 71 years. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit www.gocivilairpatrol.com or www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.

Contact info: Julie DeBardelaben – jdebardelaben@capnhq.gov – 334-953-7748, ext. 250
Steve Cox – scox@capnhq.gov – 334-953-7748, ext. 251

Nevada-Senior-Guide Life Care Centers of America – Las Vegas

http://www.lcca.com/

NSG_AugSeptOct2016_Web-12

About Life Care

Your family is special with its deep bonds and unique relationships. Facing a dramatic change – such as moving a loved one into assisted living or a nursing home – is an unsettling prospect for most people. Life Care Centers have helped families for decades to work through the difficult decisions about how best to care for their loved ones. We understand how trying it is to choose nursing home care for your loved one, and how most struggling caretakers feel there is no other choice.

That’s why we’re here.

We want those special members of your family to become equally special members of ours. We want to relieve the anxiety and frustration you may be experiencing by providing a nursing home community of constant support, attention and personalized care. Above all, we want to serve each person entrusted to us with compassion, dignity, purpose and respect.

That’s not just our goal. It’s our privilege.

Services

At Life Care Centers of America, we take elderly care very seriously. That’s why we offer residents a wide range of living arrangements and amenities, services and care. From home assisted living to retirement living to nursing homes – and even campuses that offer all three in a continuum of care – Life Care has the experience, expertise, and dedication to provide a full scope of specialty services.

Whether your needs include Alzheimer’s care, in-home nursing care, rehabilitation or recovery help, or any of a number of other specialty services, Life Care will be there, with all the support, education, and commitment you and your loved one need.

Rehabilitation

Life can deliver some unexpected twists: accidents, sudden illnesses or emergency surgeries can happen when you least expect them. And in the aftermath of such events, your energy is focused primarily on recovery—trying to also find the best available resources for help can be pretty challenging.

At Life Care, we understand the intense desire to recuperate and get back to normal as quickly as possible. But serious illness or trauma can sometimes force you to relearn even basic functions. The struggle to regain those lost capabilities while still recovering is frustrating and often overwhelming.

That’s when our teams of experts can make an overwhelming difference. Our skilled therapy services can hasten your recovery, help return lost skills and bring back strength and mobility. Our caring professionals work tirelessly with our residents not only in physical areas, but also by constantly supporting and encouraging them emotionally.

We believe our residents are the extraordinary people who refuse to allow temporary setbacks or disabilities to affect them permanently. Their determination and effort become invaluable tools in the rehabilitation process.

And it is our greatest privilege to partner with them—or you, or your loved one—during recovery … and become your strongest advocates in the road to reclaiming total wellness.

Life Care Centers of America

The sun setting is no less beautiful that the sun rising.

Imagine living in a beautiful, peaceful environment, surrounded by friends and activities.

Caring for Life…
Since 1970, Life Care Centers of America has been providing unequaled nursing care and assisted living service. Our continuum of care campuses give our residents an individual care plan through various levels of care. But it\’s our commitment to quality and professionalism that makes us second to none.

2325 E. Harmon
Las Vegas, NV 89119
702-798-7990

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!