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How to Choose the Best Anti Aging Cream?

June 26, 2016 by · Comments Off on How to Choose the Best Anti Aging Cream?
Filed under: General 

As we become old, the skin renews itself much more slowly than when you are young because the production of collagen, natural proteins that provide the firmness of the skin begin to fall, causing dehydration of the skin and wrinkles.

When you reach 30/40 years, a regular moisturizer will not be enough for your skin, you should start using anti-wrinkle cream (anti-aging) to slow the signs of aging.

Fortunately, there are now a range of anti-aging products designed for every skin type, for all ages and for different needs.

There are wrinkle creams, serums, masks, creams around the eyes, neck, hands, face, etc..

The advantages of using anti-aging creams

– Gives a brightness and youthful glow to the skin
– Eliminate and reduce wrinkles
– Strengthen and firm the skin
– Reduces the appearance of fine lines
– Check and neutralize free radicals
– Moisturize and nourish the skin
– Rejuvenate and firm the skin
– Stimulates the production of collagen and elastin
– Harmonize the pigmentation of the skin
– Stimulates cellular activity and firm the skin
– Prevent the appearance of new wrinkles
– Helps rebuild the skin texture
– Redefine the skin of the cheeks and neck
– Helps repair signs of loosening around the neck and chin
– Renouvelent the elasticity of the skin by stimulating its natural healing processes
– Satisfies wrinkles

How do anti-aging creams?

Most anti-aging products contain retinol, collagen, alpha hydroxy acid, minerals and vitamins. These elements are known for their power to stop the signs of aging and reduce wrinkles and fine lines.

Once the anti-aging cream is applied to the skin, the components therein inhibit muscle movement and to reduce wrinkles and prevent their further training.

Substances penetrate the outer layer of the skin and repair. They also stimulate the production of collagen and elastin in the skin.

Other wrinkle operate by separating the upper layer of the skin, allowing healthy new cells of the skin to appear (that are generally products containing alpha-hydroxy acids).

You should know that all anti-aging products can remove wrinkles or fine lines after the first few days of use.These products gradually smooth your skin and the results are usually seen after a month or two.

How to choose the best anti-aging cream for the face to you?

Today, anti-aging creams are specially designed for specific skin problems: some creams treat crow’s feet, dark circles around the eyes and fine lines around the mouth, others are designed to revitalize the skin, reducing the depth of wrinkles and firm the neck.

There are even anti-aging creams for the hands, neck and neckline.

There are anti-wrinkle products for each skin type: for those who are fat, dry or sensitive.

One of the most important rules when choosing the best anti-aging product for your skin is to look at the components of the product.

It is essential to choose an anti-aging cream that suits your skin type and needs.

If your skin has a lot of wrinkles around the eyes, you should consider buying an anti-aging cream for the eyes that treats crow’s feet and dark circles around the eyes.

During the selection of anti-aging cream make sure it is not too hard or very greasy as it can clog pores and cause a problem if it is left on overnight.

It is essential to choose a product that offers good sun protection (SPF of at least 15 or more) to protect your skin from harmful sun rays that cause premature aging of the skin.

Today, most anti-aging creams available and contain antioxidants that neutralize free radicals associated with excessive exposure to the sun can cause serious skin problems.

Common components of anti-aging creams

Retinol (vitamin A)

Vitamin A is a powerful antioxidant that neutralizes free radicals that cause premature aging usually (Free radicals break down skin cells and collagen in the skin).

Retinol is also known as vitamin A, retinoic acid and retinoid.

Vitamin A is probably the most component used in anti-aging creams, serums and toners. It reduces wrinkles, fine lines and discoloration of the skin and stimulates collagen production. Vitamin A is also known for its ability to tighten pores and minimize sun damage.

Retinol is widely used to treat severe acne and rosacea.

The kinetin

The Kénitine a natural component that helps the skin retain natural moisture and stimulates collagen production.

It is a powerful antioxidant that can also fight against uneven pigmentation. It restores the function of the natural moisture of the skin, helps to preserve and soften the skin without side effects and provides protection for the skin against free radical damage.

Α-hydroxy acids (AHA or)

AHAs are widely used in the cosmetic industry because they remove the top layer of dead skin cells and stimulate the growth of healthy new cells.

Α-hydroxy acids work come exfoliating agents, they have a cooling effect on the skin and improve its overall appearance.

Α-hydroxy acids generally used include: glycolic acid, lactic acid and salicylic acid.
Α-hydroxy acids act as deep into the dermis and stimulate the production of collagen and elastin fibers which are essential for healthy skin.

You should know that all types of α-hydroxy acids increase susceptibility to the harmful effects of the sun and it is essential to use sunscreen daily to avoid sun damage.

Α-hydroxy acids are present in a variety of products including skin care moisturizers, cleansers, eye cream, sunscreen, and foundation.

Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10 is a fat-soluble vitamin-like substance found in every human cell and that neutralizes free radicals (acts as an antioxidant) and reduces fine lines and wrinkles. It prevents sun damage and skin discolorations.

Coenzyme Q10 is commonly used in anti-wrinkle creams and serums because it prevents damage to collagen and elastin production process and help prevent fine lines and wrinkles.

Copper peptides

Copper peptides are widely used in anti-aging creams, because they stimulate the production of collagen.Copper peptides also enhance the action of antioxidants and enhance wound healing.

Copper peptides are effective against various forms of skin irritation, mainly because of their anti-inflammatory effects. Copper peptides also stimulate the formation of elastin and reduce sagging and wrinkles.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is a powerful antioxidant that helps reduce the appearance and depth of wrinkles. It stimulates cellular renewal of the skin.

There are different forms of vitamin A: retinol, retinyl palmitate and retinyl linoleate. Lack of vitamin A can cause dryness and hardening of the skin.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is an antioxidant with a brightening effect of the skin.

It is a common component in products skin care as well as makeup products because it gives the skin a youthful and stimulates blood circulation.

Vitamin C also keeps the skin elastic and prevents premature aging of the latter.

When combined with vitamin E reduces the signs of aging: wrinkles, fine lines, brown spots and age spots.

Vitamin C is also known as ascorbic acid.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E provides natural protection against harmful UV rays.

Vitamin E creates a moisture barrier and prevents the discoloration of the skin. It helps the skin to repair itself.

Antioxidants

The most common are vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin E. Antioxidants neutralize free radicals and prevent premature aging of the skin.

Many beauty products: the facial cleansers, moisturizing lotions, tonics, claim to contain antioxidants.

Antioxidants are added to cosmetic products containing fat such as lipstick and moisturizers to prevent rancidity.

Tea extracts

Tea extracts (green tea, black tea, white) are usually found in anti-aging creams, serums, masks and lotions.

The tea extracts act as antioxidants in the fight against free radicals. They have anti-inflammatory properties and help in repairing skin damage.

Retinoids

Retinoids are chemical compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A. They make the skin thinner and smoother and reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.

Retinoids are widely used in the treatment of many diseases and are effective in treating a number of skin conditions such as inflammatory disorders of the skin, cancer, skin disorders in cell renewal and aging.

Retinoids reduce wrinkles, freckles, blackheads (whiteheads and blackheads), and stains caused by sunlight.

Topical retinoids are also effective treatments for mild acne and severe.

It takes about 3 months for the skin acclimates to a retinoid.

Hyaluronic acid

Hyaluronic acid is a component of connective tissue whose function is to cushion and lubricate the skin.

It is found naturally in the skin, its function is to hold water.

Useful tips related to the use of anti-aging creams

– Apply your anti-aging cream with upward strokes from the throat to the front.
– Do not forget: you may need to use an anti-wrinkle for several weeks before you notice improvement.
– Ask for samples before buying a face cream to see if it works for you.
– Try to use a facial cleanser with glycolic acid.
– Exfoliate your skin regularly (at least twice per week) with a gentle exfoliant to remove dead skin cells and accelerate cell renewal.
– Always use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 to protect your skin against the sun’s harmful rays that cause premature aging of the skin and causes discoloration.
– Consult a dermatologist or esthetician to give you the product that best suits you.
– It is essential to get a good amount of sleep each night.
– Try to use a wrinkle cream that contains more natural ingredients, vitamins, essential oils, aloe vera and natural emollients.
– You can put on your sunscreen cream.
– Choose makeup: foundation, concealers, lipsticks, lip glosses that offer sun protection.
– It is essential to follow a strict regimen of skin care every day to keep your skin clear and healthy.
– Always remove your makeup at night with a mild cleanser that suits your skin type.
– Use masks or face firming moisturizer twice to keep your skin radiant mature.
– Drink plenty of mineral water at least 1.5 liters a day to keep your body and skin hydrated.
– Perhaps now is the perfect time to quit smoking: Smoking seriously harms health and damages the skin by destroying collagen and elastin.
– Compare different wrinkle creams and find out what works best for you.

For more information about wrinkles and anti-aging creams visit my blog Best Cream for Wrinkles.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7259744

The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

Fight the Flu with Healthy Habits

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

11949(Family Features) With cold and flu season upon us, it may be tempting to hibernate until the danger of red, puffy eyes and a stuffy nose disappears. Waiting for a cold or flu to run its course can truly feel like an eternity, especially when the symptoms have you looking as bad as you feel.

 

While there is no guaranteed strategy for avoiding the flu or sniffles, there are steps you can take to safeguard yourself and your family. And if you do fall ill, taking extra care will help ease you through until you’re on the mend.

 

While the Centers for Disease Control recommends the flu shot as the single best preventive measure, you can also help ward off illness with healthy habits like these:

 

  • Keep yourself and your belongings away from others who may be sick to prevent the spread of germs. Don’t share dishes and utensils in the kitchen, and provide sick family members with their own hand towels in the kitchen and bathroom.

 

  • Wash your hands frequently using soap and water or an alcohol-based rub. Avoid unnecessarily touching your eyes, nose and mouth, which are easy portals for germs to enter your body.

 

  • Keep your immune system running strong by eating sensible and nutritious meals, exercising regularly, managing stress in a healthy way and getting plenty of sleep.

 

If your prevention falls short and you find yourself combatting sniffles, take these steps to nudge yourself back to good health:

 

  • Consult with your pharmacist or doctor about which medications may help relieve your symptoms.

 

  • Use a soft facial tissue on your irritated skin. Puffs Plus Lotion is dermatologist-tested to be gentle and helps soothe irritated skin by locking in moisture

 

  • Stay home for at least 24 hours after a fever passes. This will help you catch up on much-needed rest and prevent the chance of passing anything contagious on to your friends and co-workers.

 

  • Calm stuffy sinuses with the steam of a long, hot shower. Take the sinus soothing a step further by using Puffs Plus Lotion with the Scent of Vicks.

 

  • Cover your nose or mouth with a tissue like Puffs when sneezing or coughing to minimize the spread of germs.

 

As your symptoms ease, remember to take it easy and allow your body to fully recover so you don’t suffer a setback that needlessly prolongs your illness.

 

For more tips for warding off discomfort from a cold, flu or allergies, visit www.puffs.com.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

2 Easy Travel Tips for Long Trips With Elderly Seniors

January 20, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Are you planning on any traveling with your elderly parents this year – for holiday visits with long distance family members or perhaps just to have a fun trip out to see sights and enjoy lovely scenery? My senior mom and I just returned from a 7 hour drive to visit some of her great-grandkids. It was a lovely visit but we did come back with a few tips to share with fellow journey-ers.

I routinely keep 4-5 lap blankets of different weights in my car – for her and for my grandkids. That way, if the car is too cool for anyone, they can balance it out easily with a snuggly warm blanket. Then, if they get too hot, it’s easy to toss it off. And the different weights are especially helpful for my senior mom, as she can go from very cold to very warm much faster than normal. This allows her to easily swap blankets as her body temperature changes without having the heater or the cooler blast her in the face to try to accomplish the same thing.

She has always enjoyed car trips in the past, but the past couple of years they’ve been less pleasant. She has found that sitting too long bothers her back and her arthritis. On the trip out, we stopped every couple of hours to walk around, get a drink, use the restroom, etc. and that worked well. By the time we headed home, she was happy over the visit, exclaiming, “This was SUCH a nice time together,” yet aching more than her normal amount. She took some medicine before we left that helped a bit and also encouraged sleeping on the way. She didn’t feel up to…  (keep reading… http://eldercareabcblog.com/2-easy-travel-tips-for-long-trips-with-elderly-seniors/)

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September is Healthy Aging Month, making it an ideal time to shed some light on an important issue that impacts millions as we age – our eyesight. With around 1.75 million people in the country having age-related macular degeneration, according to the National Institutes of Health, and another 2.2 million suffering from glaucoma, vision is a crucial issue as we age. The good news is that there are things you can do in order to help your eyes age healthily.

“Healthy eyesight is one of those things that people don’t pay much attention to until there is a problem,” explains Dr. Edward Kondrot, founder of the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center. “Ideally, it’s best to take measures to avoid those problems. Many of the problems people have with their vision as they age can be avoided, and even reversed.”

Regardless of one’s age, it is never too early or too late to do things to maintain healthy eyes. Here are 5 tips for doing just that:

  1. Be proactive. Those who do nothing to protect their vision may find they have problems as they age. Just like being proactive to have a healthy heart or mind, it is important to make healthy vision a priority. This means purposely including healthy vision measures in your lifestyle.
  2. Eat healthy foods. Diet plays an important role in maintaining one’s vision. It is important to eat plenty of antioxidant-loaded fruits and vegetables. They are nutritional powerhouses that will help to protect the eyes. Also, it is crucial to opt for organic foods, so that your body does not take in all the harmful chemicals. Those chemicals provide a toxic overload, which impacts the eyes, as well as the rest of the body.
  3. Stay hydrated. Many people who have eye problems are also dehydrated. Staying hydrated is essential to maintaining good eye health. Start each morning with a full glass of room-temperature water. Drinking things like tea and coffee do not count. Add a little lemon if you prefer, which will also help to flush toxins.
  4. Watch the shades. Millions of people have taken to wearing sunglasses, but may not be choosing ones that actually protect their eyes. Worse yet, they may choose some that actually weaken them. Dark sunglasses are not necessarily a good choice, as many may believe. When selecting sunglasses be sure to opt for those that block ultraviolet A and B light to really offer your eye protection.
  5. Reduce eye stress. People stress their eyes in ways that they are not even aware of, such as sleeping in a room that has a night light, or light coming from an alarm clock or another room. Another way people stress their eyes is to watch television in a dark room. Both of these things can provide unnecessary stress that can cause damage over time.

“Healthy aging of the eyes can be done and is being done by millions,” adds Dr. Kondrot. “It comes down to being aware of what will help and harm the eyes and then taking measures to do what will benefit them in the long run.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, Fla. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

Massage For Senior Citizens – Benefits and Precautions by Eva Gnech

August 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

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Probably the most important benefit of massage is the pleasure of human touch, and the companionship provided during massage therapy sessions. This provides a relaxation which alone may relieve some of the loneliness, depression and fears that many seniors suffer from. A recent study found that all senior citizens who were receiving regular massages showed a dramatic improvement in their moods and their attitudes toward life in general. Nearly 50% of the same group tested also showed additional health benefits;a reduction in their rates of breathing, an increase in their range of motion, an improvement of their postures, development of more body awareness, their skin took on healthier colors and their muscle tones were enhanced.

In addition to these general life improvements, some health conditions that may respond positively to regular massage include:

– inflammations in the joints;

– arthritis;

– skin discoloration and other dermatological conditions;

– deteriorating muscles and bones;

– reduced appetite and therefore weight loss;

– poor blood circulation;

– sleep disorders;

– weakened mental capacity,

– tendonitis;

– bursitis;

– asthma;

– emphysema;

– high blood pressures;

– diminished functions of the internal vital organs such as the heart, the liver, the brain, the thyroid, the stomach and the intestines.

Before you make your appointment, make sure you take care of safety first:

– Find a massage therapist that is properly trained;

– Limit your appointments to 30-45 minutes at a time;the elderly appear to respond better to shorter, more frequent sessions.

– Be careful when positioning yourself on the massage table: ask for help or request a chair massage.

– Tell your massage therapist if it is your first massage: request a gentle relaxation massage. Your bones may be thinner and your joints stiffer than other patients; ease into it. Over time you may request a deeper tissue massage if it feels comfortable for you.

– Tell your massage therapist if you are not comfortable being touched in some areas: Many elderly prefer head, hands and feet massages. Even massaging these body parts alone will greatly benefit you.

– Request use of lotions or oils, or bring in your own favorite lotions: senior citizens’ skin tends to be thinner and less pliable, and using oils will help avoid cracking or damaging of your skin. Lotions will also soften and moisturize your skin, making it healthier and more pliable.

Relax and enjoy your massage! With the above precautions massages are perfectly safe regardless of your age. Most importantly, massages help you relax and improve your outlook on life. That alone may alleviate other aches and pains and make this worth your while.

So contact a qualified massage therapist today, and make the appointment that will help you relax and enjoy some TLC, you deserve it!

For a more detailed description of the benefits and precautions of Seniors Massage, see http://massagetherapystartup.com/massage_therapy_for_senior_citizens.html.

For more information regarding massage therapy, setting up your own massage therapy business, or how to make a lucrative living in the massage industry, see http://massagetherapystartup.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Gnech

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Health Care for Senior Citizens – About Arthritis by KV Gopalakrishnan

August 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

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Once you cross the threshold of fifty years, it is best to be aware of some typical diseases which have the potential to diminish your enjoyment of everyday living. Arthritis is certainly one of the ailments that falls into this class. This article offers you, in a nutshell, information about the disease, as well as the lifestyle modifications, which might enable you to prevent it and address it if needed.

What is Arthritis?

Arthritis is typically the swelling and infection of one or more body joints, where a pair of bones meet. Arthritis develop when the cartilage, which protects a joint and enables it to move freely, gets affected. Since the cartilage facilitates in absorbing impact when stress is exerted on the joint like when you walk or jog, its damage affects movement of the joint. When the normal quantity of cartilage material diminishes, the bones may begin rubbing with each other, triggering discomfort, swelling (inflammation), and rigidity, resulting in Arthritis.

Causes for Arthritis

The damage to the cartilage and joint soreness can occur due to a variety of factors. This impairment to the cartilage can occur due to normal wear and tear of joints, a damaged bone, infection in the region caused by bacteria or virus, and in some cases due to an auto-immune condition wherein body immune system erroneously assaults healthy tissues. Generally Arthritis gets cured once the particular trigger goes away or is addressed. At times the disease does not get cured. When this occurs, it is called chronic Arthritis.

Signs and symptoms of Arthritis

The indicators of this illness include joint ache, joint inflammation, restricted movements of one’s joints, soreness on the skin close to a joint, stiffness especially in the early morning and warmth all-around a joint. An early on diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis is definitely a crucial factor in treating it and also preventing it from turning into acute.

Treatment options for Arthritis

The healthcare specialist treating Arthritis is referred to as a Rheumatologist. The comprehensive treatment solution of Arthritis consists primarily of life-style modifications, physical exercise program, and if needed medicines, dietary supplements and surgical procedure. Immediate therapy include things like, heating or cooling, Orthotics (splints) support, water treatment and massage therapy. The objective of treatment is usually to minimize suffering, enhance function, and prevent further harm to the joint. Nevertheless, in a few instances, the root cause can not be remedied.

Cure for Arthritis – Lifestyle changes

Life-style modifications are the favored treatment solution for Arthritis as well as other types of joint inflammation. Primarily, it is important to get rid of any excess weight to reduce the stress on the affected joints. Physical exercise may help alleviate stiffness, minimize suffering and fatigue, and boost muscle and bone strength. It is best to seek advice from your therapist to design a workout plan that may suit your needs.. Work out plans may also incorporate low impact aerobic activity, flexibility workouts and power training for muscular tissues. If necessary, the therapist can recommend usage of some unique devices to help you to drive, dress and do other everyday activities.

Other tips which can enable you to get relief include:

 

  • Having 8-10 hours of sleep,
  • Avoiding remaining in one position.
  • Avoiding extra pressure on joints and
  • Practicing yoga and meditation.

 

So far as nutrition is concerned, it is best to eat healthy diet which include:

 

  • Substantial amount of fruits and veggies,
  • Omega three rich foodstuff such as fish, soybeans and walnuts.
  • Complex carbohydrates with minimal salt, sugar and fat
  • Green tea is claimed to scale back inflammation and degradation of cartilage.

 

Prevention of Arthritis

For prevention of Arthritis, please take care to avoid strain or injury to joints and also to have timely cure of infections in the region of joints. It might be far better to stay away from jogging after you cross fifty years of age mainly because it can result in weakness to knee joints and lower back.. Swimming is an effective alternative for jogging.

The lifestyle adjustments and the dietary recommendations described in the section ‘Cure for arthritis – Lifestyle changes’ are equally relevant in preventing it.

The goal of this short article is to present you with basic information about Arthritis as well as emphasize the significance of lifestyle modifications for curing and preventing it. Having said that, you should invariably seek the advice of a healthcare professional to treat the ailment.

Senor Citizen Consultant

Retired from Government service and enjoying life.

My aim is to help senior citizens by giving useful tips to enable them to enjoy health, wealth and happiness.

http://enjoyafter50.com/ <-Visit this website for tips and tricks to make your retirement life happy and enjoyable.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=KV_Gopalakrishnan

Furniture Pieces That All Senior Citizens Need by Monika Kay

July 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As you get older, the body starts to break down and simple tasks can suddenly become very difficult. Going down the stairs or taking a bath can pose hazards that previously never existed. It might eventually be necessary to purchase furniture and accessories that can help you to get around the house easier. Here are some pieces that senior citizens should consider purchasing in the immediate future.

A Wheelchair

A wheelchair can be purchased for able-bodied and disabled individuals alike. For people who can still walk, using a wheelchair once in a while can take away the strain that is often felt in the joints. For individuals who have great difficulty walking, a wheelchair allows them to travel for long distances and participate in out-of-the-home activities.

A Bath Lift

Bath lifts are great apparatuses for the home because they take away a lot of the danger that can be found in bathrooms. Slippery floors and spills can make entering the tub a precarious activity. Bath lifts, on the other hand, slowly lower individuals from the top of the tub to the bottom. This makes bath time a considerably safer time.

A Lift Chair

Getting up from the couch or the recliner can be much more difficult for senior citizens. A lift chair takes away this difficulty by raising the back end of the apparatus, helping an individual to get up from a sitting position into a standing one. This is a great chair for any living room or den.

A Reclining Bed

These types of beds are very similar to the ones found in hospitals in that they can recline and lift at the headboard and the baseboard. Reclining beds meant for the home are a lot more comfortable and a lot less sterile. This is really good for older individuals who may have difficulty sleeping or who need to rest in a certain position.

A CD Player

This might seem like an odd choice but it has to do with quality of life as opposed to practicality. Several studies have shown that music can enliven and excite even the most comatose individuals. Many senior citizens fight off depression and loneliness and great music is one of the best cures for these conditions.

When it comes to acquiring furniture, older individuals should purchase things according to their needs. Older and more fragile bodies require assistance and all furniture pieces should accommodate this. The better equipped a home is, the more likely an individual can continue to live a full and happy life.

You must absolutely check out and browse the Lift Chair Store if you want to save BIG on mobility furniture, lift recliners and more… http://www.lift-chair-store.com/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Monika_Kay

 

Need Self Defense for Senior Citizens? Buy Personal Alarms by Carl Vouer

April 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Human beings are the most dangerous creature ever to walk the Earth. I am not  saying all humans are bad; in fact I like to think that the vast majority of us  are caring, thoughtful, non-violent creatures that pose a threat to absolutely  no one. However, I am not so naive that I don’t realize the fact that there are  those of us out there that truly live without a conscience and have no trouble  nor lose no sleep over hurting others for their own personal gain. What really  concerns me is that these bad people I speak of are not always entirely  unintelligent and because of this they are going to choose targets they feel  will give the least resistance. These bad guys (and gals) are going to take  advantage of people they consider to be of inferior strength when choosing  someone to mug and you know who oftentimes fits that bill? Senior citizens.

Time unfortunately slows us all down and as a result our growing senior  population is finding themselves the target of more and more wrong doings. This  is something that should concern each and every senior citizen and why every  senior should have a means of defending themselves in the unfortunate event of  an attack. The options for defending one’s self are relatively vast but the one  that makes the most sense for senior citizens, in my opinion, is personal  alarms. Personal alarms are ideal for seniors because they are completely safe  to use, unlike a firearm, self-defense baton, pepper spray, stun gun or any of  the other most popular choices available when discussing self-defense.

A personal alarm does not work by incapacitating an attacker but by hopefully  scaring them away with the fear of being apprehended. You see a criminal will  not have a very successful criminal career if that criminal is not afraid of  being caught and a great way for a criminal to be caught is for people to be  watching when he or she commits a crime. And what is a great way to draw  people’s attention? How about with a 130 decibel shriek from a personal alarm?  That will usually do the trick and when an attacker hears that shriek he or she  knows darn well that anybody in the nearby vicinity heard it as well and will be  looking his way immediately. I think chances are pretty good that the second a  senior citizen sets a personal alarm off that the majority of criminals will  turn tail and run from the scene.

So if you are a senior citizen or anyone that wants to add a very effective  measure of safety please consider buying a personal alarm.

Stay Safe,

Carl Vouer

To see more items of self defense for seniors or to buy personal alarms please visit us online

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carl_Vouer

 

Ways Senior Citizens Can Keep Young by Charice Louise

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

No one wants to grow old before his or her time. There are some things senior  citizens can do that will keep them looking and feeling younger. Consider these  seven ways seniors can stay young.

Geriatric Massage is one of the best things senior citizens can do for  themselves. The massage of the muscles improves blood circulation by moving  blood cells that may have become trapped in the capillaries. The massage  provides relief for stiff and sore muscles resulting in the person feeling  better. As muscles are released, the individual has more freedom of movement  resulting in an improved posture. Many seniors report fewer problems with  insomnia or other sleep problems after a massage.

Senior citizens soon learn that eating healthy is in their best interest. A  healthy diet provides the needed fiber to keep the individual regular and fight  the discomfort of constipation. Eating healthy food provides the body with  antioxidants to fight disease and can prevent health problems. The senior who  selects healthy foods is more likely to maintain a healthy weight, one of the  keys to living a more active life with fewer health problems.

There is a tendency of some seniors to withdraw into their own homes and  avoid socializing with others. However, you need to socialize in order to stay  young. If you have hobbies that you love, now is the best time in life to  partake in them. Make an effort to remain in touch with friends and family. The  banter of conversations with those outside your own home is necessary to keep  your mental functions sharp.

Exercise has many positive benefits for the senior citizen. In addition to  making the person look younger and fit, exercise can improve flexibility and  increase mobility. A workout releases endorphins, chemicals that help to improve  the overall mood. The person who is in shape is less likely to experience falls,  which can lead to broken bones.

Retirement can be a joyous time; however, it is easy to begin to feel that  your existence on earth is no longer making a difference. Seniors that get  involved stay younger by knowing that their presence matters. Many volunteer  organizations need help. Become a grandma or grandpa volunteer at local schools.  Volunteer at a hospital. Use your time to benefit your church, synagogue or  other house of worship.

Use your brain to keep young. Get a library card and read on a regular basis.  Enroll in a community college course to learn something new. Keep your brain  challenged using crosswords, puzzles and games.

Use meditation to reduce stress on a daily basis. Use relaxing exercises such  as tai chi or yoga (often available at your local Y) to reduce your stress  load.

Massage Envy Spa Valencia, CA is Valencia’s most affordable spa. Visit them  online today at http://www.massageenvy.com/clinics/CA/Valencia.aspx, or visit  their blog at http://expertmassagetherapy.com/valencia/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Charice_Louise

 

Fill Your Life With Satisfaction – Eight Bonuses For Senior Citizens Activities By Jerry Elrod

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

2009 offers opportunities and activities for creating a life satisfying  series of days and moments. A year doesn’t happen all at once, even for senior  citizens who decry how rapidly time flies. The Senior Citizen age is an  everyday, minute at a time process. We surprise ourselves when we discover what  we can do with time. The first goal of a senior citizen is to make every day  productive.

So, here are some early New Year clues for filling life’s days with  satisfaction.

1. Convince yourself that being of Senior Citizen age is a plus. Plan daily  activities that under gird a positive attitude. Read books that enable your  being a positive person, engage in exercise that assists your health and  mobility. Look for one task to do that gives you a sense of accomplishment.

2. Identify one thing that you are exceptionally competent in doing. Do not  limit yourself to the ordinary, but stretch yourself to find something you might  have never considered undertaking: for men, how about knitting or cross  stitching; for women, being able to work on your car.

3. Set a goal of the number of books you will read within a month’s time.  Choose books you always told yourself you wanted to read.

4. Choose one volunteer activity per month that will give you a sense of  community and interactive pride. Find something that allows you to be with  persons whom you don’t normally identify as friends.

5. Work on your spirituality. Note, the word is spirituality, not religion.  Identify with some group, spiritual discipline, devotional exercise which will  enlarge sense of self worth.

6. Study your diet. Work with your spouse or significant other or a dietitian  to be sure you are eating well and assisting your health with healthy meal  planning.

7. If you need more to do, consider an unusual hobby. There are no limits on  solid and available opportunities.

8. Get a good night’s sleep! Recommended sleep is 8 hours per night.  Determine what schedule works best for you. Try not to vary it.

Finally, review your progress in meeting your goals to create a life  satisfying pattern for yourself. Keep a Journal so that you may evaluate your  progress or lack of it. In a few months, you will have created new, healthy  habits and activities which will contribute to your life’s satisfaction as a Senior  Citizen.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Elrod

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!