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Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
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Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7334746

The Programmed Cellular Death Approach to Anti-Aging Treatment

May 8, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Programmed Cellular Death Approach to Anti-Aging Treatment
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Modern anti-aging treatment is built on a common base of knowledge that I will quickly review. Biochemistry and molecular biology tell us there are many types of chemical reactions going on in the human body. We know that it is the genetic information programmed inside our cellular DNA that defines what reactions occur. Genetic information, expressed in regulated ways, builds the body’s proteins and enzymes, and controls how enzymes carry out the cell’s biochemical reactions.

This information, contained in the DNA of our genome, consists of many thousands of long, often repetitive, sequences of base pairs that are built up from four basic nucleotides. Human genome mapping has shown there are over 3 billion base pairs in our DNA. It is estimated they contain some 20,000 protein-coding genes. All body functions are controlled by the expression of the genes in our genome. The mechanisms controlling the aging process are believed to be programmed into our DNA but only a fraction of the biochemical reactions related to the aging process have been looked at in any detail. Cellular aging is a very complex process and many of its low level operating details have yet to be discovered.

Anti-aging theory has consolidated itself along two lines of thought: the programmed cellular death theory and the cellular damages theory. The programmed death theory focuses on the root causes of aging. The cellular damages theory looks at the visible aspects of aging; i.e. the symptoms of aging. Both theories are correct and often overlap. Both theories are developing rapidly as anti-aging research uncovers more details. As works in progress these theories may take years to complete. This broad characterization also applies to the currently available types of anti-aging treatments.

The programmed death theory of aging suggests that biological aging is a programmed process controlled by many life span regulatory mechanisms. They manifest themselves through gene expression. Gene expression also controls body processes such as our body maintenance (hormones, homeostatic signaling etc.) and repair mechanisms. With increasing age the efficiency of all such regulation declines. Programmed cellular death researchers want to understand which regulatory mechanisms are directly related to aging, and how to affect or improve them. Many ideas are being pursued but one key area of focus is on slowing or stopping telomere shortening. This is considered to be a major cause of aging.

With the exception of the germ cells that produce ova and spermatozoa, most dividing human cell types can only divide about 50 to 80 times (also called the Hayflick limit or biological death clock). This is a direct consequence of all cell types having fixed length telomere chains at the ends of their chromosomes. This is true for all animal (Eukaryotic) cells. Telomeres play a vital role in cell division. In very young adults telomere chains are about 8,000 base pairs long. Each time a cell divides its telomere chain loses about 50 to 100 base pairs. Eventually this shortening process distorts the telomere chain’s shape and it becomes dysfunctional. Cell division is then no longer possible.

Telomerase, the enzyme that builds the fixed length telomere chains, is normally only active in young undifferentiated embryonic cells. Through the process of differentiation these cells eventually form the specialized cells from which of all our organs and tissues are made of. After a cell is specialized telomerase activity stops. Normal adult human tissues have little or no detectable telomerase activity. Why? A limited length telomere chain maintains chromosomal integrity. This preserves the species more than the individual.

During the first months of development embryonic cells organize into about 100 distinct specialized cell lines. Each cell line (and the organs they make up) has a different Hayflick limit. Some cell lines are more vulnerable to the effects of aging than others. In the heart and parts of the brain cell loss is not replenished. With advancing age such tissues start to fail. In other tissues damaged cells die off and are replaced by new cells that have shorter telomere chains. Cell division itself only causes about 20 telomere base pairs to be lost. The rest of the telomere shortening is believed to be due to free radical damage.

This limit on cell division is the reason why efficient cell repair can’t go on indefinitely. When we are 20 to 35 years of age our cells can renew themselves almost perfectly. One study found that at the age 20 the average length of telomere chains in white blood cells is about 7,500 base pairs. In humans, skeletal muscle telomere chain lengths remain more or less constant from the early twenties to mid seventies. By the age of 80 the average telomere length decreases to about 6,000 base pairs. Different studies have different estimates of how telomere length varies with age but the consensus is that between the age of 20 and 80 the length of the telomere chain decreases by 1000 to 1500 base pairs. Afterwards, as telomere lengths shorten even more, signs of severe aging begin to appear.

There are genetic variations in human telomerase. Long lived Ashkenazi Jews are said to have a more active form of telomerase and longer than normal telomere chains. Many other genetic differences (ex.: efficiency of DNA repair, antioxidant enzymes, and rates of free radical production) affect how quickly one ages. Statistics suggest that having shorter telomeres increases your chance of dying. People whose telomeres are 10% shorter than average, and people whose telomeres are 10% longer than average die at different rates. Those with the shorter telomeres die at a rate that is 1.4 greater than those with the longer telomeres.

Many advances in telomerase based anti-aging treatments have been documented. I only have room to mention a few of them.

– Telomerase has been used successfully to lengthen the life of certain mice by up to 24%.

– In humans, gene therapy using telomerase has been used to treat myocardial infarction and several other conditions.

– Telomerase related, mTERT, treatment has successfully rejuvenated many different cell lines.

In one particularly important example researchers using synthetic telomerase that encoded to a telomere-extending protein, have extended the telomere chain lengths of cultured human skin and muscle cells by up to 1000 base pairs. This is a 10%+ extension of telomere chain length. The treated cells then showed signs of being much younger than the untreated cells. After the treatments these cells behaved normally, losing a part of their telomere chain after each division.

The implications of successfully applying such techniques in humans are staggering. If telomere length is a primary cause of normal aging, then, using the telomere length numbers previously mentioned, it might be possible to double the healthy time period during which telomere chain lengths are constant; i.e. from the range of 23 to 74 years to an extended range of 23 to 120 or more years. Of course this is too optimistic because it is known that in vitro cultured cells are able to divide a larger number of times than cells in the human body but it is reasonable to expect some improvement (not 50 years but say 25 years).

We know that telomerase based treatments are not the final answer to anti-aging but there is no doubt that they can, by increasing the Hayflick limit, extend or even immortalize the lifespan of many cell types. It remains to be seen if this can be done safely done in humans.

Telomerase based treatments are only a partial answer to anti-aging. Please carefully research any anti-aging supplements based on this line of treatment. Through my articles and website I want to help you maintain your good health for the next 10 to 25 years. My hope is that within time period the fruits of anti-aging research will become available to everyone.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9227048

Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age

April 24, 2016 by · Comments Off on Take a Number: Five Ways to Look at Age
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One for the Ages

Satchel Paige was a great baseball pitcher, one of the greatest of all time. He was an African-American and, due to the racial discrimination of the time, most of his outstanding career was not spent in the (white) major leagues. However, after the historic breakthrough by the courageous and talented Jackie Robinson (Mr. Paige’s junior by about 14 years), Satchel Paige pitched in the major leagues for a number of years. In fact, he was still able to get major league batters out at the age of 60! (Mr. Paige’s age at his retirement from baseball is not known for certain because no one, probably including Mr. Paige himself, knew his exact year of birth; some thought he was older than 60). Mr. Paige revealed a mind as sharp as the break on his curve ball when he asked this profound question for the ages:

“How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?”

These writings are dedicated to the memory of Satchel Paige and to all the so-called “over-the-hill” guys and gals in every sport and in every area of life, from Churchill and Reagan in politics to Jessica Tandy in acting and Paul McCartney in fatherhood. They and many like them in the past and present will be joined by many more in the future who are not really “over the hill” because they are too busy taking the hill.

Five Ways to Look at Age

Chronological Age

The most common way to look at age is the Chronological. This is the one that everyone is familiar with. It is simply the time that has passed since your date of birth to today. It is the one that governments and insurance companies require of you and that your Doctor knows, even if your boy friend doesn’t. It is a unidimensional measure because it considers only time. It is uniform because everybody who is 48 years, 6 months, and 3 weeks old is exactly that, chronologically. People who view age only from the chronological perspective are somewhere between dumb and dumber.

True Age

True Age is another and better way to look at your age. True age is basically what a measurement of all the biomarkers of aging would reveal about you. Here’s four points about true age. One, if a well-trained physician did NOT know how old you are but reviewed a print-out of your biomarkers, she or he could accurately estimate your true age. Two, your true age is not uniform but varies by individual: you can be younger or older than your chronological age. Three, true age is multidimensional rather than confined to time. Four, absolutely nothing can be done about chronological age because it is fixed, but a great deal can be done about true age.

Appearance Age

Appearance Age is the age you appear to be to others. It no doubt has some relationship to both chronological age and true age. Yet it is different. This is because it is heavily influenced by a number of factors outside the scope of biomarker measurement, not the least of which is attitude. We all know people that appear to be quite a bit younger or older than their chronological age. But the only scientific way to measure a person’s appearance age would be to have a representative sample of the population observe a person for at least a few minutes. A quick glance is not sufficient because appearance age includes factors such as movement of the body and alertness, not just a frozen face. Then the estimates from all members of the representative sample would be gathered, simple statistical measures applied, and Voila! You have the person’s appearance age. Of course, unless we are part of a study, none of us will ever get this scientific about it. We will just have to rely on random comments from friends, family, and nice or mean strangers to estimate our appearance age; and usually it’s a pretty good estimate.

NEAT Age

A new way to look at age, which occurred to me awhile back, is what I call one’s N.E.A.T. age. This is simply one’s time left on the planet from right Now to the time of death. This age is unknowable by readers or anyone, except those committed to imminent suicide (and these poor folks are no more likely to take the short time remaining to do age calculations than they are to be caught dead reading an article about lively longevity). The best we can do is make a calculated estimate based on what we know about the general population and factor in any pluses or minuses that apply to us individually.

The N in NEAT of course stands for Now since the calculation is from the present, today, right now. E is for Elusive because I believe moments of time are elusive. As we humans try to hold or capture a moment of time it eludes us because the next moment is here, and then the next. Time and life are a flow.

The A in NEAT is for Allotted. Everyone who has ever lived has only so much time to live. Some have short lives, some have long lives, and some have lives neither particularly long nor short. But human life is finite and almost certainly will remain finite into the distant future if not forever. We do not need to take sides in the age-old debate about whether or not our allotted time is predestined by God in order to recognize that the amount is finite.

Of course, T is for Time. Time remaining is what it is all about. As has been oft noted: a millionaire on his death bed would gladly exchange his riches for a little more time, say one more day of healthy living.

So one’s NEAT age is one’s Now Elusive Allotted Time. It is a concept that provides a different perspective on aging and on life. For example, let’s suppose there was a 30-year old person named Terry and a 60-year old person named Sydney living in the same town in 1960. Conventional wisdom and simple arithmetic agree that Sydney was twice as old as Terry at that time. Such wisdom carries the (usually) unstated assumption that Terry is about 30 years further from the grave than Sydney. Statistically, this is difficult to argue with. But statistics are oft off for an individual and sometimes by a wide margin.

Let’s suppose that Terry had a lifetime of very bad health habits and, never having had the opportunity to read my writings, continued the very bad habits. Poor Terry expired a little shy of 40. (The same fate could have befallen Terry due to a dreaded disease or tragic accident.) Sydney, on the other hand, decided at some point to lead a health-conscious life. Sydney made good choices and stuck with them. Sydney enjoyed basically good health beyond age 100 before passing on. When Sydney was 60 and Terry was 30, Sydney had a NEAT age of 40+ and Terry had a NEAT age just under 10. So way back in 1960, who was younger: the one with less than a decade of life left, or the one with more than four decades of vibrant life left? One of the neat things about the NEAT age is that the bigger this age number the better.

Ideal Age

The fifth and final way that we will look at age is one’s Ideal Age. Your ideal age is your age of choice, your preferred age. The concept of ideal age brings us back to Satchel Paige’s question:

How old would you be if you did not know how old you are?

In a sense, perhaps most of us do NOT know how old we are anyhow. Sure we know our chronological age, and some of us have a rough gauge of our appearance age. But few of us know our true age, and none of us knows our NEAT age. So it should not be so difficult to put chronological age aside for a few moments and answer Mr. Paige’s question.

Before leaping to an answer like 21, keep in my mind that successful living usually involves a combination of physical vigor, mental acuity, and wisdom. Personally, my ideal age is 37; thus even at my next birthday I will still be one year younger than all the women over 40.

What about you? What’s your number? What’s your ideal age? The way my anti-aging program works for you is that after reflection you establish your ideal age. Then we work with all the tools and techniques of the program to bring your true age into ever closer alignment with your ideal age. There is a balance to be struck. A 90-year old reader shooting for an ideal age of 19 is setting up way too much of a challenge and thus is setting up for failure. A 50-year old reader settling for an ideal age of 45 is not challenging herself or himself enough.

Take a number.

Satchel Paige was the impetus for me to write the close to this article:

When it comes to matters of age,

It is best to take a page out of Paige,

And move forward with grace,

Paying no mind to this myth of the human race.

Gary Patrick is a certified anti-aging professional (Giovane Medical Services). He is also an author, hypnotist, personal trainer, and speaker. Free stuff is available for a limited time at his web site: [http://rapidresults.biz]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Gary_Patrick/18668

New Survey Reveals that Aging Parents and Adult Children Aren’t Always On the Same Page!

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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In honor of National Family Caregivers Month, life transition planning and daily money management firm LifeBridge Solutions, LLC surveyed nearly 400 aging parents and adult children. The national survey was conducted online November 12 – 14, 2013.

Survey results indicate that adult children are generally more concerned about their aging parent’s wellbeing than the older adult is about his or her own situation. Both generations are concerned about the older adult’s general health and safety and about driving. However, the aging parents top concerns include worry about running out of money and how they will pay for care, while the adult children worry about their parent not asking for (or accepting) the help they need and about their parent’s inability to manage medications.

LifeBridge Solutions’ President Sheri L. Samotin says, “Unfortunately, adult children often live a long distance from their aging parents and don’t see them as often as they’d like. As a result, they worry about what’s going on with Mom or Dad and feel a need to put mechanisms in place to keep their parent safe. By the same token, many aging parents are adept at hiding their need for assistance from their children as they fear that their children will try to take over.” Samotin is the author of the forthcoming book, Facing the Finish: A Road Map for Aging Parents and Adult Children (www.FacingtheFinish.com).

While only 25% of the aging parents surveyed report that they are stressed because of their adult children, nearly twice as many adult children report being stressed because of their aging parents. Consistent with these results, it is not surprising that more adult children than aging parents would change something about their relationship with the other generation. However, the top thing both groups would change is to live closer to and/or see the other more often. The next most common wish for both groups is to have better relationships with one another.

According to government statistics an estimated 25% of adult children currently provide hands-on and/or supervisory care for one or more of their parents. This number has tripled over the past fifteen years and is expected to increase dramatically as the population ages. Caring for aging parents is often referred to as the new mid-life crisis.

LifeBridge Solutions, LLC, founded in 2009 provides life transition planning, daily money management and medical billing advocacy services to clients nationwide.

For more information contact:
Sheri L. Samotin, President, LifeBridge Solutions, LLC
323.452.2680

Read more news from LifeBridge Solutions.

Animal-Senior Citizen Companionship Leads to Improved Overall Health

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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 The mental and physical benefits of animal companionship have been praised across the world, from seeing-eye dogs to therapy dogs to household pets. According to the US Pet Ownership and Demographics Sourcebook, there are approximately 70 million pet dogs and 74 million pet cats in the United States. Of this number, about 63 percent of pets are considered to be members of the family. Now, pet adoption companies are utilizing the health improvements to better the quality of life for senior citizens.

“The pairing of seniors with calm, manageable adult dogs and cats has yielded amazing vitality and unparalleled effects, the feeling of loneliness dissolves and a reason to be active arises,” affirms Will Post, CEO of Hound & Gatos Pet Food, whose mission is to provide the public with high-quality pet food options for dogs and cats. “The simple presence of animal companionship can provide amazing health benefits that truly lift a senior’s mental and physical state because they have someone to depend on and someone who depends on them.”

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports that pets can reduce stress, lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, in addition to increasing social interaction and physical activity. Add unconditional love, purpose, and that special something to care for and nurture, and you have an elixir for senior citizens.

According to Pet Partners, seniors with pets experience fewer minor health issues when visiting their doctor, and overall better health and mental well-being.  Pets are also praised for reducing loneliness and depression, two major factors that can lead to an unhealthy body and mind. Since dogs live in the present, their focus on ‘today’ tends to rub off on their owners, resulting in managing anxiety levels.

“These positive results of animal companionship for seniors is one more reason to encourage the ownership and nurturing of pets for the seniors of today. We are only beginning to document these facts determining the health benefits of pet ownership for the elderly, though animal lovers have always suspected it. Their contribution to a better quality of life being recognized can only lead to happier and healthier seniors, something we can all be excited about,” says Post.  “The importance of love proves to be a major force in life no matter what age one might be.”

Research continues to show that pets help people of all ages enjoy a much fuller and rewarding life, and the mission of Hound & Gatos Pet Food Corporation is to try to create cat and dog formulas that can ultimately improve our beloved pet’s vitality and longevity. Dubbed as the original Paleolithic pet food company, their recipes are 100 percent protein and zero percent plant protein, with the number-one ingredient being meat. To learn more about Hound & Gatos, including where to buy products, visit their site at: www.houndgatos.com.

About Hound & Gatos Pet Foods Corporation

Hound & Gatos Pet Foods Corporation is based in New York. Their mission is to provide the public with high-quality pet food options for dogs and cats. Their line of pet foods focus on quality ingredients that provide maximum nutrition, and avoid all bi-products and other ingredients that would generally be unnatural to a pet’s diet. For more information on Hound & Gatos visit the site at www.houndgatos.com.

 

# # #

Source: American Veterinary Medical Assocation. US Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook.https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Statistics/Pages/Market-research-statistics-US-Pet-Ownership-Demographics-Sourcebook.aspx

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Health Benefits of Pets.http://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/health_benefits.htm

Pet Partners. Health Benefits of Animals for Seniors. http://www.petpartners.org/page.aspx?pid=312

Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

Caregiver nominations taken online at www.twilightwish.org until October 15

The national nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving are pleased to announce the “Caring for the Caregiver” award. According to a recently released Bureau of Labor Statistics survey, over 39 million Americans provide hours of unpaid care to someone over the age of 65. Caregivers often struggle with their own physical, financial and mental needs. This program was created to recognize and reward these deserving senior caregivers who often put their own needs last by providing a respite from caregiving duties.

“Often, caregivers are seen as hidden patients themselves,” said Cass Forkin, founder of Twilight Wish. “Although caregiving is a labor of love to many, the stress and strain of providing around-the- clock care often takes a toll on the caregivers, both mentally and physically.”

According to David Spain, CEO of Parentgiving, many caregivers are often not able to get the break from their responsibilities that they need. “This program offers caregivers the chance to relax and rejuvenate, away from their daily duties,” said Spain. “We want them to know that their selfless contributions and dedication are appreciated.”

Twilight Wish and Parentgiving chose August 21 to launch “Caring for the Caregiver” because it’s National Senior Citizens Day, first proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan in 1988. “Older citizens are reinforcing their historical roles as leaders and as links with our patrimony and sense of purpose as individuals and as a Nation,” said the late president.

Anyone can nominate a deserving caregiver by filling out an application at www.twilightwish.org.  Caregivers can nominate themselves. Entries will be accepted through October 15, 2013. The winner will be notified in early November 2013. The “Caring for the Caregiver” award may be a two-night hotel stay, restaurant meal(s), spa treatment(s), or tickets to an event or any combination of these as chosen by the award winner. The winner will also receive free in-home caregiving services from a local senior homecare organization, ensuring a worry-free getaway.

Twilight Wish Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization whose mission is to honor and enrich the lives of deserving seniors through wish granting celebrations that connect generations. Since its founding in 2003, Twilight Wish has granted over 1,931 individual wishes to deserving, low-income seniors, thanks to volunteers, corporate and community involvement, and donations. Recent wishes granted include a visit from a string band for a nursing home resident’s 89th birthday, transporting a nursing home resident to Christmas Eve dinner with family, and hearing aids for an Army veteran who wished to be able to hear his grandchildren’s voices. For more, visit www.twilightwish.org.

Parentgiving.com is a leading online destination for seniors and their caregivers, offering a wealth of information on eldercare, news, Q&As with experts, and healthy aging resources as well as a store with thousands of homecare products and medical supplies, delivered right to the home. Bestsellers include walkers, bed rails, bath safety bars, incontinence supplies, and daily living aids. For more, visit www.Parentgiving.com. For more about Parentgiving’s mission, contact Julie Davis at 203-984-4424.

For more about the “Caring for the Caregiver Award,” contact Mary Farrell, Twilight Wish Director of Community Relations, 215-230-8777 ext. 103

Read more news from Parentgiving

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

World’s Leading Ophthalmologist, Dr. Edward Kondrot, Cycling 335 Miles to Raise Awareness for Macular Degeneration

July 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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World’s Leading Ophthalmologist, Dr. Edward Kondrot, Cycling 335 Miles to Raise Awareness for Macular Degeneration

DADE CITY, FLORIDA – (July 18, 2013) – On July 19, 2013, Dr. Edward Kondrot and his wife, Ly, are beginning a 335-mile bike through the beautiful Great Allegheny Passage. Their journey starts in Pittsburg, PA and ends in Washington, DC, an estimated ten-day ride. The couple are biking to raise awareness about alternative treatments for macular degeneration and asking for sponsors to pledge anything from 10 cents to $10 per mile. All the funds raised will go to Restore Vision Foundation, an Arizona non-profit Corporation.

According to the National Eye Institute, Age-Related Macular Degeneration, or AMD, is a common eye condition, usually occurring in adults 50 years and over. It is the leading cause of vision loss in older adults as the macula is destroyed, creating blurry images. Your risk of developing AMD rises with age, as well as if you are a smoker or if you have family members with macular degeneration.

“I think it’s important to highlight the statistics of AMD due to the sheer number of people that are affected,” affirms Dr. Kondrot, the world’s leading ophthalmologist and founder of Healing the Eye & Wellness Center. “Most people with AMD are recommended to get laser surgery or injections, but alternative treatments are much less invasive and have incredible results.”

“If I’m going to bike 335 miles in my sixties, I think the cause is important,” adds Dr. Kondrot, “I want people to realize that harsh surgeries and medication is not the only way to go to prevent or treat macular degeneration. The goal is to raise awareness about alternative therapies, which can be more effective and less invasive. We hope to raise a lot of money for the Restore Vision Foundation.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

To pledge, please visit: http://ow.ly/n0FFp

To follow Dr. Kondrot and his wife on their journey, visit: http://ow.ly/mZikP

To learn more about the Restore Vision Foundation: http://www.restorevisionfoundation.org/RVF/Welcome.html

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, FL. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

# # #

Source:

National Eye Institute. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/maculardegen/armd_facts.asp#1

Know How Senior Citizens Become Targets for Fraud by Diana R Beam

July 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Although you and I can’t imagine cheating anyone- especially a sweet-natured senior citizen- thousands of other people can. In fact, they make a career of lurking in the shadows, waiting to the win the trust of your aging mother, beloved grandfather or isolated, elderly neighbor.

According to the National Crime Prevention Council, 56 to 80 percent of fraudulent telemarketers intentionally dial senior citizen’s telephone numbers. This is appalling information, of course. But this statistic hopefully has your full attention. To protect the aging loved ones in your family, you must commit yourself to two goals: one, to consistently stay abreast of fraud and scams directed toward the elderly; and two, make sure to educate your aging loved one about the do’s and don’ts of telephone communication, email responses, door-to-door sales visits and how to safely dispose of important personal information or documents that are no longer necessary to keep.

Aging seniors are often easy targets for criminals because:

  • The senior may be confused easily during telephone contact, either by dementia or hearing impairment.
  • The caller is a smooth talker who wins the trust of the vulnerable lady who lives alone.
  • If the dishonest telemarketer speaks sternly, demanding perhaps, that she absolutely must provide personal information, elderly seniors may feel intimidated, stressed and confused. More often than not, fraud has again been accomplished by the time the phone call ends. The senior may be unsure of how to judge if the call is legitimate, so the more pressured she feels; the more likely she is to give the demanded information.
  • The con artist telemarketer strikes up a conversation and asks many questions which not only builds a trusting relationship for a later con but also, the senior has unknowingly provided personal information to a potentially dangerous stranger. “You sound lonely today, Mrs. Smith. Does your family live in your neighborhood? What day does your daughter stop by? And that’s the only time you see other people? Just on that day? Well no wonder you sound a bit depressed.” You get the picture. By the end of many conversations, seniors have unknowingly placed themselves in danger not only for identity theft but also for burglary or worse.

 

Identity theft is rampant in our country and every person of every age is a potential victim. Keep in mind, though, that career thieves scope out particular trash cans- especially those of aging seniors. They wait for innocent victims to carelessly toss banking information, social security numbers, etc. in the trash can. So make a list of don’t-throw-away documents and tape it to your loved one’s fridge, to help her remember what to keep. Then periodically collect documents that are no longer needed and safely shred the information.

Helping aging loved ones can be a challenge because they can unwittingly become the targets of unscrupulous con artists that neither they, nor you, see coming. Your best defense is a proactive offense- starting with awareness.

Checking on aging loved ones every day to be sure they are safe is a challenge, however, you don’t have to go it alone. You have a valuable resource in Diana Beam, founder and owner of Keeping in Touch Solutions. Diana has ways to help your aging loved ones continue to live independently and safely in their own homes as long as possible while giving family comfort and peace of mind. Learn more at http://www.KeepinginTouchSolutions.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diana_R_Beam

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Multivitamins For Senior Citizens – Why Some Types Are Better Than Others by Michael Walters

May 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The effectiveness of multivitamins is due in large part to the fact that they  are targeted towards specific demographics. There are multivitamins just for the  elderly, for women and even specifically for men. The ones targeted towards  senior citizens in particularly raise questions.

It’s fairly simple – people think about multivitamins targeted at senior  citizens because those things seem like they’re inherently stronger. This is  because senior citizens require just a little more than everyone else.

There are other alternatives that have as much of a health kick as senior  multivitamins. Premium class supplements are just as strong, if not stronger  than senior multivitamins, so it’s an option.

Seniors, naturally, find themselves lacking in nutrition more than the young.  It’s important to keep yourself healthy during the golden years. Your comfort  could be drastically improved if you make sure that you enter those years as  healthily as you can manage.

Don’t get fooled by the name – there’s more to multivitamins than you’d  think. There are special ingredients that include resveratol as well as herbal  extracts that are unique to specific multivitamins that you should consider when  picking your multivitamin.

It can get confusing, but luckily the internet is here to help you out. I’ve  researched these things myself for the better part of the decade and believe me,  there’s enough information out there to help you become educated just like  me.

Your health is reliant on what things you give your body. Give it the  nutrition it deserves and it will treat you right. Scientists and doctors can’t  be wrong about it.

So many lives are lost because people don’t take care of themselves. Make  sure to buy the best multivitamins that you can find to make sure that you don’t  become just another statistic. Be a survivor and take the vitamins that you  need.

Read more of this author’s work on electronic topics like cheap computer speakers and computer speaker cable.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_Walters

Death is Not My Next Goal – More Advice For Senior Citizens by Jerry Elrod

May 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Aging is a phenomenon which introduces all kinds of subjects and issues we  would rather leave alone. Many senior citizens (and others) are timid and  reluctant to broach the subject of death, being ready for it, making necessary  practical plans and decisions and even admitting to its very likelihood.

Death, however, will happen to each of us, whether we admit, like it, deal  with it or not. Thus, the question, why the hesitance? Discussing death does not  speed its coming, nor prevent its happening.

Recent studies have shown that in the United States male longevity for a 70  year old male today will likely extend to 83.2 years. A female, aged 70, will  likely live to 85.8. These statistics come from the Center for Disease Control  and Prevention.

Depending on where you are on that scale, the news may be either good or not  so good. There is a story making the rounds of a person who said, “I wouldn’t  want to live to be 90,” to which his listening friend allowed: “You must not be  89.”

Dear Seniors, do not make Death your next goal, but remember, Denial is not a  river in Egypt. There is room for some in-between choices here, in-between  denial and talking openly and comfortably about death. If you don’t talk about  it, or if you try to ignore its reality, you just create more problems. You make  it something like the huge elephant in the room. Something unknown that is to be  feared. It’s not an elephant… it’s just death, something that will happen to  each of us. And talking about it doesn’t make it happen sooner. Most of us  simply are not in control of when or how we die.

In order for Death to be removed from your list of life goals, it is not  necessary to pretend it isn’t going to happen to you.

In addition to the practical issues of seeing a doctor and participating in  appropriate care disciplines, there are other dynamics surrounding the “D” issue  that need our attention.

  1. Spend time with your significant other and/or family looking at the issues  surrounding death and how they will be managed as necessity and wise assessment  of conditions indicate.
  2. Lay it all out. Do not skirt issues. Be courageous in opening those matters  about which some will find discomfort and even embarrassment. Dealing with it  now is better than delaying. Delay will create considerably more discomfort and  likely more disagreement within the family.
  3. Go so far as to talk about what a memorial or funeral service would look  like. Put it down in a record. Date it. Change it if necessary.
  4. Open up issues like traditional burial or cremation and scattering of ashes.  Deal with economic issues.
  5. If more comfortable, invite a professional, a pastor or other who would not  impose judgment, but allow for wide ranging issues to be exposed and  addressed.
  6. Maybe, make a group list of the issues that really would be helpful to  discuss. Have Kleenex handy for those who will, naturally, have some emotional  moments.
  7. If/when some anecdotal stories are told, have someone write them down for  recall when the time comes for a celebration of life.
  8. While death is not our next goal, this exercise will begin to put it in its  place.

 

Remember the maximum life expectancy in Sweden in the 1860’s was 101. It is  now 108. And, by the way, 70% of the increase is attributed to death rates above  70. Given optimal genes and good medical care, no one, so far, has lived beyond  123. The good news is you and I have about a 1 in 2 billion chance to live to  120.

Death is not a goal, There is an old song which Virginia slaves used to sing  at funerals: “Come down, death, right easy.” For let that be our song, senior  citizens and all.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Elrod

 

Senior Citizen Jobs – Great Opportunities Revealed by Abhishek Agarwal

April 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

It cannot be denied that some employees prefer to employ younger people. In  spite of this, job market researches have shown that senior citizens have a wide  range of job opportunities before them.

The following statistics reveal that the number of employers who realize the  potentials of senior citizens, and the benefits of employing them, is on the  rise.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has shown that from August 1989 to August  2003, the positions of over 380,000 employees aged between 15 and 24 were  replaced by senior citizens. To explain the point further, when a large number  of Australia’s younger workers left their jobs to become full-time students,  their employers preferred to employ older people in their stead.

More than 500,000 employees in Netherlands are aged 55 and above, and the  number has been steadily rising since 1995.

Competing with the Younger Generation

In order to compete with the younger generation, a senior job seeker has to  take the following factors into consideration.

When you are preparing your resume, emphasise on your accomplishments,  without seeming to brag about them. You have one advantage over the younger  applicants and, that is, your experience, along with a list of achievements and  posts held over a long period of time.

Your work history is just as important as your personality. Employers have a  tendency to notice gaps in employment when a person has been unemployed;  however, they also emphasize on how long a person has served each of his or her  previous employers.

Refresh and enhance your skills by reading voraciously and enrolling in a  variety of programs that will improve your expertise. Keep in touch with the  latest developments and trends in your particular field of service.

Continuously research the Internet for fresh opportunities. Several agencies  place advertisements on the Internet, especially stressing their preference for  senior citizens. The availability of a number of search engines and job sites  will definitely make your job easier.

Best Jobs for Senior Citizens

Here is a list of opportunities that do not focus on the applicants age.

Specialized jobs: For example, people applying for the position of a doctor  are hired on the basis of experience and not age.

Lecturers or speakers: Senior citizens are paid to speak on a topic of their  expertise, and here, age does not really matter. What matters, however, is  qualification, knowledge, and experience.

Writers: A writer’s age is irrelevant. All that is required for novelists,  playwrights, or children’s writers is an excellent hold over language. Moreover,  they can work in peace and comfort from their own houses,  a real bonus for  those who are advanced in years.

Abhishek is an expert at conducting interviews and he has got some great  Interview Success Secrets [http://www.Career-Guru.com/4/index.htm] up his  sleeves! Download his FREE 82 Pages Ebook, “How To Ace Any Interview”  from his website [http://www.Career-Guru.com/4/index.htm]. Only limited Free  Copies available.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Abhishek_Agarwal

 

Senior Citizen Travel Insurance: What You Need To Know by Jane Conway

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Finding travel insurance can be difficult for anyone, but if you are over a  certain age, then you may discover that getting the coverage you need is even  more challenging. This article covers the basics of why finding senior citizen  travel insurance can be more difficult, and what specifics you need to look for  in your plan.

In the world of insurance, money talks. Money, and statistics. And according  to statistics, senior citizens are more likely to make insurance claims than are  younger travelers. This results in less money made and more money paid out by  the insurance companies. The result? They are reluctant to offer insurance plans  to travelers over a certain age. While some insurers cap their age limits at 65,  others may go as high as 70, 75, or even 80. Still, over a certain age, you’ll  be unable to get travel insurance with many agencies, no matter how good your  current health is. Other companies may offer coverage, but at higher costs, and  with fewer benefits.

Not only is travel insurance for seniors more difficult to find, there are  also a lot of needs and issues that you may need to think about in an insurance  plan. For example, older travelers are more likely to have preexisting  conditions that need covered. Many older travelers will also be bringing medical  equipment or medications with them. Things such as walkers, wheelchairs, or  prescription drugs, can be easily lost or stolen, and they can be difficult and  expensive to replace while you are traveling. A good senior citizen travel  insurance plan will have coverage for these things. Another thing to think about  as you are looking for your travel insurance plan is to look out for reduced  benefits. As mentioned above, it is not uncommon for insurers to offer higher  costs and less coverage to seniors. Make sure that you know the exact details of  the plan that you are purchasing,

If you are having trouble finding insurance through regular insurers, then  you may want to consider looking into specialty plans. There are a number of  companies out there that specialize in travel insurance for senior citizens. Not  only do they have no upper age limit, they also give you specific coverage that  is tailored to your needs as an older traveler. With these plans, it is much  easier and hassle-free to get coverage for your preexisting conditions or for  medical equipment. Many people also find that they have some insurance cover  through retirement organizations that they belong to. Check to find out what  coverage you already have.

The most important thing is to make sure that you have coverage when you  travel. You never know what medical problems, injuries, or disasters may happen,  and the last thing that you want is to spend your precious retirement years  burdened with financial debt.

Check out these resources if you need more information about senior citizen travel insurance, or age concern travel insurance.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jane_Conway

 

What Makes Someone a Senior Citizen? by Lynn Dorman, Ph.D.

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Good question!

Developmental Psychologists have long used either ages or stages to define  segments of the population. Many developmental textbooks are divided into  chapters based on one or the other of these definitions.

Age definitions are ones that use numbers – such as: being 65 or older means  you are a senior citizen; or all over 55 get a senior citizen discount.

Stage definitions are usually feeling and behavior related – along the lines  of: “you are only as old as you feel or act.”

Over the last few decades, as we learn more and more about the later  stages/ages of the lifespan, the thinking about aging is changing – and so are  the textbooks. But the definitions are still stuck in the past.

The field of Developmental Psychology is itself aging – as are the original  developmental psychologists – and more information is becoming known and  understood about the lifespan.

Add to this that we are living longer. In 1940, the average life expectancy  at birth in the USA was 62.9 years; in 1960 it was 69.7; by 1980 it was 74.1 and  in 2000 it was 77.2. [The statistics differ by sex and ethnicity but these are  the averages for all persons.]

Average only is a middle figure. Half die before and half after the ages  cited. And if one lives past infancy, life expectancy increases and it increases  every year one is still alive. So those who were born in 1940, and are obviously  now well past 62.9, have a far different life expectancy than when they were  born. That expectancy is now somewhere into their mid 80s.

So as to defining what makes you a senior citizen? It is often left up to the  language or stereotypes we use and some legal definitions.

Most jurisdictions rely on when you can start collecting social security  benefits to define what is their senior population. Eligibility for full Social  Security benefits will increase to age 67 for those born in 1960; yet as we can  still sign up for Medicare at age 65 – 65 seems still to be the “age” definition  of senior citizen.

Will that change? It might…but not for those who are already at or near 65.  We ARE labeled senior citizens.

And what about behavioral definitions – the stages aspect?

That is up to us. We can continue to do what we have been doing – living life  to the fullest and not becoming the stereotypes many have about senior  citizens.

We are who we are – and are the ages we have accumulated!

If we let someone else’s characterizations of “senior-ness” define us or our  behavior – then we are falling prey to their stereotypes. Create your own  definition of senior.

I am of the thought that we are only as old as we feel and act! So feel  and act young!

You may still be called a “senior” but you’ll wind up confounding a lot of  people.

I invite you to read more of my take on aging at http://growolderbetter.com – and where you can sign up for  even more tidbits.

From Lynn Dorman, Ph.D., a developmental psychologist who was around way back  then and is now a 70-year-old-senior-citizen who is still figuring out what she  will do when she grows up.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lynn_Dorman,_Ph.D.

Auto Insurance And the Senior Citizen by Hema Patel

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The issue of rising premiums on auto insurance is a real concern to many  people. This is particularly true for senior citizens who are striving to live  within their means during this stage of their life. Auto insurance rates for  senior citizens is, of course, much cheaper than it would be for a young driver.  Getting this lower premium on their auto insurance has a lot to do with their  many years of driving along with their good driving history. Some seniors have  found that it is difficult for them to rely on public transportation and this  has many seniors driving around regardless of their age.

Having auto insurance is mandatory for both senior and young drivers alike.  There may be a notion that once a person becomes a senior citizen that their  insurance premiums will go up. Senior citizens actually tend to have the  advantage on premiums as compared to the younger driver. Older drivers are  actually more careful with their vehicle and less likely to be involved in  accidents. This is a proven statistic that gives them the upper hand on lower  premiums. Senior citizens that apply for auto insurance will find that their  rates will be lower if they can show a clean driving history.

Individuals that are past the age of 50 are usually included in this category  of lower premiums. Life insurance premiums will increase as you get older  however the cost of car insurance will go down. Insurance companies use many  factors that will determine the best deal for a senior citizen as each of their  needs can be different. Taking the time to shop around for the best deal and  contacting several different companies is still the best way to get the best  bargain

In this growing internet age many computer savvy senior citizens scour the  web to get their auto insurance needs met. Many seniors opt for this type of  information gathering much more than having to drive from one company to  another. Auto Insurance providers know this fact and have designed their online  presence to provide accurate rates and more importantly to present relevant  reviews on their products posted by current customers. Having all of this type  of information available on their site is a favorable option for many senior  citizens who can get what they need without going door to door.

No matter what your age is, make sure you still ask questions of your  prospective insurance company and ensure that they give you the appropriate  answers and or explanations. However if you are a senior and you need insurance  on your car, truck or other type of vehicle, you can find affordable and  dependable coverage and at lower rates. You have driven for years and you have  the age and good driving record to prove it, so do your research and you will  find the right insurance company that is looking to reward you for it.

Find out more information for your auto insurance needs at  www.auto-insurance-blog.com [http://www.auto-insurance-blog.com].

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Hema_Patel

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!