Warning: trim() expects parameter 1 to be string, array given in /home/nvsenior/public_html/wp-content/plugins/custom-post-order-category/wp-customcategorypostorder.php on line 492
television | Nevada Senior Guide

American Red Cross Advancing Health Options in Southern Nevada

January 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

dr-john-lunettaDr. John Lunetta, D.O. arrived in Las Vegas more than a year ago to help with the American Red Cross Blood Services regional expansion. For decades, the Red Cross blood supply in Southern Nevada came from other areas of the country, mostly from Idaho, Montana and Utah. But over the course of the last year and a half, the team has grown the program of blood collection to that of supplying nine of the area’s 14 hospitals.

 

But Dr. Lunetta’s presence here makes this program so much more than a simple blood collection service. Licensed to practice in seven western states, and eight of our local hospitals, Dr. Lunetta assists local doctors when they have questions about using Red Cross blood products. Transfusion recommendations to find the most compatible blood or questions about reactions to transfusions are all topics on which Dr. Lunetta can speak.

 

Dr. Lunetta also brings with him the latest in patient blood management education. His contemporary approach allows local doctors to, when appropriate; use less product resulting in less risk to patients.

 

But there are additional American Red Cross Blood Services here in Las Vegas not available in some other regions known as clinical services. With the medical equipment and the skilled nurses that work with Dr. Lunetta, Clinical Services can offer one-on-one patient contact delivering care through an apheresis machine, which uses centrifugal force to separate blood into its constituent components. This is a method used in the treatment of leukemia patients, sickle cell patients, and a large number of neurologic and oncology patients. Dr. Lunetta also oversees treatments involving some new technology using extracorporeal photopheresis, or ECP. In layman’s terms, it’s like a tanning bed for your blood.  Due to Dr. Lunetta’s expertise, some area patients will soon be able to receive treatment here that they could only get in California previously.  It’s used to treat patients who suffer from Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in which the skin is attacked by the patient’s own T-cells. The treatment calms those cells down and the skin begins to heal. An average patient needs to receive 150 – 300 procedures once every two weeks.  Another more common use of this treatment is for patients who have graft vs. host disease; usually as a result of a bone marrow transplant, or other organ transplant such as lung or heart.

 

Many more procedures and innovations are in the pipeline that Dr. Lunetta and his staff may be able to offer in the future and the Red Cross is pushing the development of new ways in which Blood Services can help in our community. From his involvement with donors at blood drives to his work with patients who get the blood transfused, Dr. Lunetta is involved every step of the way.

 

Dr. Lunetta is available for interviews for print, online, radio and television. Well-spoken and with a talent to break complex medical ideas down into language that we can all understand, Dr. Lunetta is a delightful guest and talented subject matter expert.

 

To book Dr. Lunetta, or to interview him on his range of expertise, please contact the office of Lloyd Ziel at the contact below.

 

Lloyd Ziel

Public Information Officer | Communications and Public Affairs

 

American Red Cross

Southern Nevada Chapter

1771 E. Flamingo Rd. Suite 206-B

Las Vegas, NV 89119

702-232-6604 cl

702-369-3351 of

702-791-3372 fx

Lloyd.Ziel@redcross.org

www.redcross.org/southernnevada

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

5 Tips for Healthy Aging of the Eyes

September is Healthy Aging Month, making it an ideal time to shed some light on an important issue that impacts millions as we age – our eyesight. With around 1.75 million people in the country having age-related macular degeneration, according to the National Institutes of Health, and another 2.2 million suffering from glaucoma, vision is a crucial issue as we age. The good news is that there are things you can do in order to help your eyes age healthily.

“Healthy eyesight is one of those things that people don’t pay much attention to until there is a problem,” explains Dr. Edward Kondrot, founder of the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center. “Ideally, it’s best to take measures to avoid those problems. Many of the problems people have with their vision as they age can be avoided, and even reversed.”

Regardless of one’s age, it is never too early or too late to do things to maintain healthy eyes. Here are 5 tips for doing just that:

  1. Be proactive. Those who do nothing to protect their vision may find they have problems as they age. Just like being proactive to have a healthy heart or mind, it is important to make healthy vision a priority. This means purposely including healthy vision measures in your lifestyle.
  2. Eat healthy foods. Diet plays an important role in maintaining one’s vision. It is important to eat plenty of antioxidant-loaded fruits and vegetables. They are nutritional powerhouses that will help to protect the eyes. Also, it is crucial to opt for organic foods, so that your body does not take in all the harmful chemicals. Those chemicals provide a toxic overload, which impacts the eyes, as well as the rest of the body.
  3. Stay hydrated. Many people who have eye problems are also dehydrated. Staying hydrated is essential to maintaining good eye health. Start each morning with a full glass of room-temperature water. Drinking things like tea and coffee do not count. Add a little lemon if you prefer, which will also help to flush toxins.
  4. Watch the shades. Millions of people have taken to wearing sunglasses, but may not be choosing ones that actually protect their eyes. Worse yet, they may choose some that actually weaken them. Dark sunglasses are not necessarily a good choice, as many may believe. When selecting sunglasses be sure to opt for those that block ultraviolet A and B light to really offer your eye protection.
  5. Reduce eye stress. People stress their eyes in ways that they are not even aware of, such as sleeping in a room that has a night light, or light coming from an alarm clock or another room. Another way people stress their eyes is to watch television in a dark room. Both of these things can provide unnecessary stress that can cause damage over time.

“Healthy aging of the eyes can be done and is being done by millions,” adds Dr. Kondrot. “It comes down to being aware of what will help and harm the eyes and then taking measures to do what will benefit them in the long run.”

Dr. Kondrot is the author of three best-selling books, including “10 Essentials to Save Your Sight” (Advantage Media Group, July 2012), and president of the Arizona Homeopathic and Integrative Medical Association. He has founded the Healing The Eye & Wellness Center, located just north of Tampa, Fla., which offers alternative and homeopathic routes to vision therapies known as the “Kondrot Program.” The program focuses on such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye, cataracts, and others. His advanced programs have helped people from around the world restore their vision. The center sits on 50 acres of land and features a 14,000-square-foot state-of-the art complex, an organic ranch, jogging trails, swimming pool, hot tub, and more. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

About Health The Eye & Wellness Center

The Healing The Eye & Wellness Center is located 30 miles north of Tampa, in Dade City, Fla. Founded by Dr. Edward Kondrot, the Center offers world-class alternative therapies for vision conditions, including color and vision therapy, the treatment of glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eye, and more. The center also offers a variety of seminars, webinars, and training sessions for others in the medical community. Dr. Kondrot is the world’s only board-certified ophthalmologist and board-certified homeopathic physician. He is also author of three best-selling books in the field. For more information, visit the site at www.healingtheeye.com.

“Aging in Place” is the focus of a multi-platform report by the PBS NEWSHOUR

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

“Aging in Place” is the focus of a multi-platform report by the PBS NEWSHOUR

Report is the latest in TAKING CARE: a 6-part series the challenges of long-term care

 NewsHour Online offers tips for seniors, profiles a pilot program in Baltimore, and shares personal stories

As Americans live longer, more-productive lives, many seniors are seeking ways to “Age in Place” – to grow old in their own homes rather than move in with family or to traditional retirement facilities.  As part of its ongoing reporting on the challenges of aging and long-term care, Ray Suarez reports from Boston on a non-profit membership organization that helps seniors grow old in their own homes.  The broadcast report airs Thursday, August 08, 2013 on the PBS NEWSHOUR (check local listings.)

The group, Beacon Hill Village, was founded by Susan McWhinney-Morse and 10 of her friends and neighbors who wanted to find a way to grow old in their homes without having to depend on their children for help.  For an annual membership fee, the group offers transportation, social events, and other low-cost services for seniors. The organization has become a model for the nation – there are now over 100 villages across the country and over 200 in development.

Produced with support from The SCAN Foundation, the report is the second in TAKING CARE: a 6-part series on long-term care that will continue throughout the year with reports that show the magnitude of the problem, the challenges faced by individuals and governments, and some of the models for change being tested.

PBS NEWSHOUR’s reporting on “Aging in Place” continues online:

  • 7 simple repairs to help seniors safely age in place  and an opportunity to share your own tips;
  • a “quilt” of photos and anecdotes of living alone, submitted by seniors and their relatives;
  •  an extended interview with one of the founders of Beacon Hill Village;
  • And on Friday –a video showing the work of CAPABLE, a Johns Hopkins-run, Baltimore-located organization that fixes up homes to increase mobility and function.

The SCAN Foundation is an independent, non-profit public charity devoted to advancing a world where all of us can age with dignity, independence, and choice.

PBS NEWSHOUR is seen by over 5 million weekly viewers and is also available online, via public radio in select markets and via podcast. The program is produced with WETA Washington, D.C., and in association with WNET.org in New York. Major corporate funding for the PBS NEWSHOUR is provided by BAE Systems and BNSF Railway with additional support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and public television viewers. www.pbs.org/newshour

Finding Cheap Senior Travel For Senior Citizens On The Go by Bruce A. Hoover

April 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

More and more senior citizens are rediscovering their youth by planning  vacations. Many choose to revisit locations that bring back old memories, such  as revisiting their hometowns, yet many others are stepping it up and taking  their trips to places that are more exotic. Having worked their whole lives and  getting a bit bored with the television and armchair routine, many seniors are  ready to get out-of-town and escape being home bound. Taking these vacations has  been found to be a major asset to their lives. They get to get out and enjoy  life without the hassles that working people face. Therefore, with no deadlines,  and no jobs to return to, seniors are able to have the time of their lives  without the stress that comes with being a full-time employee.

Many seniors are on a tight budget, so the ones who are computer savvy are  turning to the internet to discover cheap senior travel. This is not only great  for them, but the travel agencies, hotels, resorts, and other popular vacation  spots as well. Many discover it is easier and cheaper to book mode of  transportation, hotels and activities in advance. With senior discounts  available worldwide, more are able to visit places they may not have been able  to afford without them. In today’s society, there are many modes of travel, one  can choose flying, cruising, riding a train or road trips in RVs. With so many  choices available, seniors can have a lot of fun deciding and planning their  vacation. Being able to access a wealth of information on the internet helps  them to discover their destinations and plan activities they may not have been  aware of otherwise.

Many find it therapeutic to be able to make decisions and plan activities.  Whether they plan their vacation, or a travel agency does, they are left with  the excitement of their upcoming trip. While many seniors can plan activities  that are physically demanding, others are not so fortunate and have to resort to  planning their trips in places that cater to disabilities. There are more and  more vacation hot spots that are gearing up for seniors and others with  disabilities so finding a great place to visit is not as difficult now for those  with special needs. Some vacation resorts even have fun activities to entertain  those who are unable to get out and participate in activities that are  physically demanding.

It is unfortunate but retirement can make a senior citizen feel as if their  sense of independence is withering away. So, with all of the options available  to those planning vacations, senior citizens are more able to do things they  normally wouldn’t do; and are finding that their sense of independence can  return while they plan and enjoy their travels. Many are even planning vacations  with their families, which makes their travels more memorable for them as well  as their families. In some cases, these vacations are the only time they get to  spend a lot of time together. Some only see family on holidays so being able to  have family together in an exciting place is enticing more and more seniors to  planning travels all around the world. In today’s fast-paced society, even those  that are retired get caught up in the rat race so these vacations are a great  escape for seniors more so now than ever.

Next, by reading this you have come across a number of ways to find cheap senior travel. Click here for more senior citizens travel ideas!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bruce_A._Hoover

 

Email Marketing For Senior Citizen Centers by Dan Forootan

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Ads in the phone book and Yellow Pages are a better investment than a  newspaper ad, but senior citizen centers need to provide gentle reminders of  their presence to potential patrons, many of whom are living alone and uncertain  about venturing into something new and unknown. How can they encourage newcomers  to come to the center while reminding regular visitors of all the center has to  offer? The answer is email marketing!

A senior citizens’ center email marketing campaign will achieve a pair of  essential objectives for the center by cutting costs and delivering the message  straight to the target audience. The idea that senior citizens would be relying  on email for news would have sounded ludicrous 15 or even 10 years ago. But with  more senior citizens jumping aboard the information superhighway than ever  before, an email marketing plan is the best way to reach seniors!

Email marketing allows these establishments to provide the type of  interactive advertisement newspapers and even television commercials cannot  offer. In addition to listing the essentials such as address, contact  information and operating hours, an email can include a schedule of upcoming  events, photos of people at the center and even videos of some of the fun  activities that take place at the center. What better way is there to convince  people to come to a senior center than by showing them what they are  missing?

Even those senior citizens who do not use email can be reached via email  marketing efforts. Often times, it is the children and/or grandchildren who  investigate senior centers on behalf of their elders. The “next generation” can  sign up to receive emails from a senior citizen center and then let their  parents or grandparents know the types of events that are taking place there,  from lunches and dinners to movies, card game tournaments and performances by  local music or theatre groups.

In addition, senior citizens who use email but who aren’t the ones checking  out senior citizen centers online can still receive these forwarded messages  from their children, grandchildren or friends. The email marketing software  required for these campaigns makes it very easy to forward messages to other  interested people, which can only help generate further business for the  centers. Just as importantly, this software is inexpensive to purchase and easy  to install and manage. There is no need to add staff to implement and/or handle  these email marketing projects. Add it all up and aemail marketing campaign is a  win-win for those who operate the center as well as those who visit  it!

Dan Forootan is the President of EZ Publishing, Inc., the creator of the  StreamSend Email  Marketing service.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dan_Forootan

 

Not your ordinary joe – National Wellness Authority, Joe Piscatella, offers SIX-week Wellness and Heart Health Program

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

http://image.exct.net/lib/fec5167072610075/m/1/press_releases_header.jpg

Not your ordinary joe – National Wellness Authority, Joe Piscatella, offers SIX-week Wellness and Heart Health Program

 

RENO, Nev. (Feb. 15, 2013) –One of the country’s foremost authorities on lifestyle habits and heart health, Joe Piscatella, will offer 6 Weeks to a Healthier Heart – a six-week wellness program designed to improve heart health. The program will focus on lifestyle changes that can have a lasting impact on overall and heart health.

Piscatella underwent coronary bypass surgery at age 32 – and according to his doctors, his prognosis wasn’t good. He found a way to stay faithful to a healthy lifestyle, turned his life around and now is one of the longest-living survivors of bypass surgery – 35 years and counting.

This program is designed specifically for people who could benefit from practical tips that can be applied to daily life to achieve lasting results. Piscatella’s seminars – which TIME magazine calls a “force for positive change” – have inspired millions to achieve a healthier, better-balanced life.

Cost for the six-week program is only $50, which includes all six sessions, as well as pre- and post-fitness profiles to track results. The fitness profiles include a blood draw to calculate total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol), LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol), triglycerides and glucose, as well as weight and Body Mass Index (BMI) measurements.

Program participants across the country have reported proven results upon completion of the program. “On average, participants have lost 10.5 pounds, reduced their LDL cholesterol by 6.2 percent and increased their weekly exercise and activity by 28 minutes,” Piscatella said. “What’s even more impressive is that participants continued to report positive results even five months after the program ends. It is truly inspiring to see people adopt healthy lifestyle habits and improve their health.”

Each weekly 90-minute seminar focuses on a specific topic. All seminars will be held 6-7:30 p.m. at Hyatt Place , 1790 E Plumb Lane in Reno .

  • Monday, April 22: Make Your Health Last As Long As Your Life
  • Wednesday, May 1: Eating Healthy In A Doubleburger.com World
  • Wednesday, May 8: Move It Or Lose It
  • Wednesday, May 15: Take A Load Off Your Heart
  • Wednesday, May 22: Raising Fit Kids In A Fast World
  • Wednesday, May 29: Healthy Cooking At Home

More information about the program, including online registration is available at www.renown.org/HeartEvents. For general inquiries, call 775-982-4892.

Special media opportunity: Does a program like this sound appealing to you or a loved one? Media interested in participating in the program and sharing their story are able to do so at no cost. Interested media should contact Ayse (I-Shay) Caglar at 775-982-4609.

Media Interview / Photo Opportunity: Joe Piscatella is available for in-person media interviews Monday, April 22. He is available for other media interviews before that time via phone. Please contact Ayse (I-Shay) Caglar at 775-982-4609 

 Joe Piscatella - casual

About Joe Piscatella

Joe Piscatella, President of the Institute for Fitness and Health, lectures extensively to a variety of associations, including Fortune 100 companies, professional and medical organizations. He has authored 13 best-selling books including “Don’t Eat Your Heart Out,” “The Road to a Healthy Heart Runs Through the Kitchen,” and “Positive Mind, Healthy Heart!”. Piscatella is a frequent guest on television and radio programs that include CNN, the “Today” show, “Fox News” and “Good Morning America,” and is a guest expert on WebMD. He serves on the Legislative Task Force on Youth Health which focuses on improving nutrition and fitness in elementary schools in Washington state. He is also the only non-medical member of the National Institutes of Health Expert Panel on Cardiac Rehabilitation.

About Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health

Renown Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has more than 30 years of recognition as the region’s leader in heart and vascular care. The Institute for Heart & Vascular Health has championed innovative heart care with a history of firsts including the region’s first open heart surgery, first angioplasty and first stent replacement. Today, the Institute for Heart & Vascular Health continues to lead the way in state-of-the-art technology like the da Vinci Si HD Robotic Surgical System, 64-slice CT scanner, nuclear medicine, cardiac catheterization and the region’s only D-SPECT cameras that rule out heart attacks faster so patients can be diagnosed and treated quickly. With 17 board-certified heart physicians – more than any other hospital in the region – the heart physicians at the Institute for Heart & Vascular Health offer a variety of specialties and more than 345 years of combined cardiology experience. And with several care centers in Reno , Carson City , rural Nevada and Northern California , patients have convenient access to quality heart care throughout the region. For more information, visit renown.org/heart.

 

 

Connect with Us!

Ayse E. Caglar, MBA | Marketing Business Partner II 1155 Mill St. H8  Reno , NV   89502 | P 775-982-4609 | F 775-982-4666

Light Bulbs For Senior Citizens By Atte Aaltonen

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seeing the Light: Why Lighting Is Important for Senior  Citizens

As people age, they consider home improvements that will make their living  spaces both safer and more enjoyable. Some senior citizens choose to downgrade  to a smaller and easy-to-manage home, while others improve the safety of their  current household by making sure railings are tightly installed, rugs are put on  slippery floors and stairs are covered in soft carpet. One factor that is often  overlooked is the lighting throughout the home. While it may seem simple,  lighting is one of the most important features of the home, especially as people  get older.

According to SeniorJournal.com, senior citizens need three times the amount  of light than younger people do in order to see clearly. This is because the  lenses on the eye thicken and the pupils shrink, causing the eyes to react  slower to lighting conditions. Senior citizens with dementia also suffer from  additional eye impairment because they have a difficulty in distinguishing  objects from their backgrounds.

Not only is lighting necessary for senior citizens because of the effects of  aging, but they also need adequate lighting for safety. Senior citizens are at  an increased risk for slips and falls, so it’s important that they can see  clearly throughout the home.

Where Should Seniors Have Lighting?

It’s essential that every room has adequate lighting for both safety and  comfort, but there are certain areas that require careful attention. Make sure  that stairways and walkways have enough lighting, as these are some of the most  common places for slips and falls. Ideally, seniors should have a light switch  at both the top and bottom of the stairs so that they can switch the lights on  and off without being stuck in the dark. The lights should point toward the  stairs so that each step is well lit.

The kitchen is another room that needs adequate lighting, as this is where  seniors prepare all of their meals and handle appliances. Seniors must be able  to read the labels on food items, buttons on appliances and also be able to  handle cutting and chopping confidently. To increase lighting, consider  installing lights underneath cabinets. Other good choices include low-hanging  lights to go over a breakfast bar or recessed lighting in all corners of the  kitchen.

Another room that deserves attention is the family room or den, where  reading, watching television and relaxing is done. There is no need for seniors  to strain their eyes when engaging in their hobbies, so choose lighting that  will complement activities. For example, floor lamps that have 3-way bulbs are  ideal, since each bulb can be positioned differently, providing light from a  variety of angles.

Nightlights are also important to have throughout the home, especially  because seniors find themselves getting up during the night to use the washroom.  Consider the areas that are dark and often traveled through during the late  hours, such as hallways, stairs and bedrooms. Nightlights are easy to place in  both high and low outlets to provide sufficient lighting, at least until a  senior can reach the light switch.

What Types of Light Bulbs are Best for Seniors?

The standard and most basic type of light bulb is an incandescent bulb. What  makes an incandescent bulb a great option for seniors is that it is easy to  change, easy to keep clean and fits in standard lamps and fixtures. Because  incandescent bulbs contain no mercury or lead, they can be disposed of or  recycled with the regular trash.

Fluorescent light bulbs are another great option for seniors because they are  efficient, produce little heat and last up to 20,000 hours. A longer life means  seniors won’t have to change the bulbs as much. Fluorescent light bulbs do  contain mercury however, so it’s important to dispose of them properly.

Turning Light Bulbs On and Off with Ease

Light bulbs and fixtures aren’t the only important factors to consider;  seniors must also think about how their light bulbs will be turned on and off.  If possible, make sure that all light bulbs can be turned on using a light  switch so that the room is well lit upon entering or exiting. As an added  benefit, choose to install dimmers onto light switches so that the intensity of  the light can be altered using the switch.

Other great options are rocker switches, which are larger than standard  switches and can be turned on and off using an arm, elbow or even a cane. If  there are rooms where the lights are not hooked up to a light switch, clap-on  lights should be considered. These friendly alternatives make it easy for  seniors to gently clap their hands in order to activate light bulbs.

How to Safely Change a Light Bulb

Providing a senior citizen’s home with enough light is not only essential for  safety, but it also allows seniors more independence and confidence. Best of  all, once proper lighting is installed, seniors can maintain their light bulbs  and fixtures themselves. To change a light bulb is simple and requires no tools,  as long as the bulb is in a lamp or fixture that does not contain a glass  reflector. If a glass reflector is present, a small screwdriver can be used to  loosen the screws and remove the bulb.

1. Turn off the electricity and let the bulb cool for 5 minutes.  2. Hold  the base of the bulb firmly with one hand, while turning it counterclockwise  until it is released from the socket. 3. Insert the new light bulb into the  socket, making sure it fits snug. 4. Turn the light bulb in a clockwise  direction until is locked in. 5. Switch the electricity to “on” and make  sure that the bulb is working properly.

What to Look for When Choosing Light Fixtures

There may not be much that seniors can do about existing lighting, but if  updating fixtures or purchasing a new home, there are certain light fixtures to  consider. Look for ceiling fixtures that do not contain globes around them.  These need to be removed and cleaned often in order to maintain their look and  proper lighting. Not to mention, in order to reach these fixtures, seniors will  need a ladder or step stool, which only increases the risk of slips and  falls.

Floor lamps make great lighting options since they are easy to maintain.  Light bulbs can simply be swapped out and a cloth or paper towel can be used to  wipe down the bulbs and fixtures. Best of all, floors lamps are inexpensive, can  be matched to any décor and can be moved throughout the home.

Wall sconces are other great alternatives to ceiling lighting, especially in  stairwells and bathrooms. Wall sconces make it easy to change out light bulbs  and most models have openings on both the top and bottom. Sconces are easy to  clean, have decorative appeal and provide ample lighting, especially is awkward  places and corners.

Proper lighting is vital for the safety and independence of senior citizens.  Fortunately, senior centers and retirement homes have improved their standards  in regards to lighting, but it’s important that the homes of seniors are not  ignored. Take the time to consider new and updated light bulbs and fixtures, as  well as increasing the wattage where applicable. Ultimately, seniors will find  their homes more enjoyable and comfortable with these minor home  improvements.

Visit this site for information about fluorescent light bulbs.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Atte_Aaltonen

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4293228

AARP: George Davis Appointed AARP State President

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

George Davis Appointed AARP State President

African-American Business Executive is Top Advocate for AARP’s 3.1 million members California

PASADENA, Calif., April 3, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — George Davis of Los Angeles, CA, has been appointed AARP California State President. Prior
to his appointment, Davis was acting state president and served for two
years on the state’s Executive Council, a five-member council that provides
direction and leadership in carrying out AARP’s strategic priorities in
California.

Davis came to AARP as a distinguished executive in the broadcasting and
entertainment industry.  He is currently Principal of Davis Broadband Group, a Culver City based consulting firm that advises media and entertainment
companies on digital content distribution.  Earlier in his career, Davis was
managing television technical operations in the US and Asia at Technicolor
and Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Throughout his career, Davis has been actively involved in
community and public service.  In 1999, he was appointed by Governor Pete
Wilson to the board of the California African American Museum.  A few years
later Davis was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to represent the
public as a member of the Board of Governors of the California State Bar.  He
is also a board member of New Directions, a nonprofit organization that helps
homeless veterans.

As volunteer state president, Davis will lead the California Executive Council and work in partnership with State Director Katie Hirning and in collaboration with other volunteers and staff to achieve AARP’s strategic priorities in the state.

“We are thrilled to have George as our new state president,” said State Director Katie Hirning. “He’s a long-time advocate for small businesses and a strong supporter of
technology and outreach to diverse populations.  His knowledge and experience
in these areas will greatly benefit AARP’s more than 3 million California
members.”

Davis is an avid hiker and enjoys collecting rare books when traveling abroad.  He resides in Los Angeles and has two adult daughters and a son attending college.

AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people turn their goals and dreams into real possibilities, strengthens communities and fights for the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare,
employment security and retirement planning. We advocate for consumers in the
marketplace by selecting products and services of high quality and value to carry the AARP name as well as help our members obtain discounts on a wide range of products, travel, and services.  A trusted source for lifestyle tips, news and educational information, AARP produces AARP The Magazine, the world’s largestcirculation magazine; AARP Bulletin; www.aarp.org

AARP TV & Radio; AARP Books; and AARP en Espanol, a bilingual news source.  AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to political campaigns or candidates.  The AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older persons in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. AARP has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of
Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Learn more at www.aarp.org

.

AARP Launches New YouTube Series, The Cheap Life with Jeff Yeager

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

AARP Savings Expert’s Weekly Series Helps People Get the Most for their Money
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Today, AARP launched the latest in its original video series on YouTube, “The Cheap Life with Jeff Yeager,” featuring AARP savings expert Jeff Yeager. During each weekly episode, Yeager, who is also known as the “Ultimate Cheapskate,” will discuss tips and tricks on how consumers of all ages can pay less for just about everything, save for retirement, get the most for their money and up-cycle or reuse everyday items through creative repurposing.
(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20070209/NYF043LOGO)
“We know our members want programming that features fun and everyday ways to save,” said Larry Gannon, AARP Vice President of TV and Radio Programming. “‘The Cheap Life’ is one way AARP is meeting the wants and needs of our members and others—by helping them and their families save real money and live the life they want, but at a fraction of the cost.”
For the past four years, Jeff Yeager has been a popular contributor to AARP via online articles and “savings challenges,” print articles in AARP’s Bulletin and “AARP The Magazine,” AARP television series and web-only videos and a weekly blog. Past videos featuring Jeff are among the most viewed and many of his articles are among the top read articles in the money section of www.aarp.org.
“Our research shows that AARP members are using YouTube to view videos online,” Gannon said. “And through this popular interface, ‘The Cheap Life’ delivers fun and engaging ideas on how to enjoy life more by spending less. Subscribers to The Cheap Life YouTube Channel will be able to interact directly with Jeff and have their tips and savings ideas shared with a worldwide audience.”
Each three to five minute episode of “The Cheap Life” will link back to relevant articles, blog posts and other helpful tools found on www.aarp.org. Episodes may include:
The Repurposing Challenge—Encouraging viewers to find multiple uses for everyday household items;
Don’t Throw That Away!—Jeff shares one of his many favorite repurposing ideas;
Cheapskate Shout-out—Jeff acknowledges people who have embraced the “cheap life;” and,
Cheapskate Hall of Fame/Shame—Jeff identifies people who have excelled or failed at being frugal.
“The Cheap Life” is part of a customized AARP YouTube destination that streamlines the user experience and better organizes the more than 2,000 videos available for site visitors. In 2013, AARP will continue to expand its online content offerings by developing premium original programming for the AARP YouTube channel in the form of weekly series focusing on the areas of money, health and beauty, technology and travel.
Consumers can subscribe to “The Cheap Life” for free by visiting www.YouTube.com/CheapLifeChannel and becoming a registered YouTube user. The first episode, “Travel Tips for the Frugal,” can be found by visiting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zob8NFodEtw.
AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people 50+ have independence, choice and control in ways that are beneficial to them and society as a whole. AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to either political campaigns or candidates. We produce AARP The Magazine, the definitive voice for Americans 50+ and the world’s largest-circulation magazine; AARP Bulletin, the go-to news source for the 50+ audience; www.aarp.org ; AARP VIVA, a bilingual lifestyle multimedia platform addressing the interests and needs of Hispanic Americans; and national television and radio programming including My Generation and Inside E Street. The AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older persons in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. AARP has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Learn more at www.aarp .org .

CONTACT: David L. Allen, +1-202-434-2560, media@aarp.org

Tips for caring for elderly parents – new book release

August 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Statistics show that nearly 10 million adults over the age of 50 are caring for aging parents, according to a study by the MetLife Mature Market Institute.

In her new book Mixed Nuts, professional counselor and therapist Dr. Mary Speed highlights actual patient experiences and offers advice on a variety of topic areas, including caring for an aging parent. Her tips include:

• When communicating, turn off any background distractions, such as the television or radio.
• Schedule appointments for the mornings. Before you go, work together to write down questions to ask.
• For arrivals and departures, plan for an extra 30 minutes each way.
• Try to connect new information and concepts to something familiar.
• Inform ahead of time about anticipated changes.

If you would like a copy or set up an interview with Dr. Speed, please contact Stephanie Lowe- slowe@bohlsengroup.com

nevada-senior-guide Pacifica Henderson


Henderson Senior Living – Pacifica Green Valley

Pacifica  Senior Living understands that at any age, maintaining a sense of  freedom and independence is very important. At our Henderson senior living community you  will enjoy a lifestyle of choice. Our Heartland Assisted Living staff  is trained to provide the services you may need in a supportive  environment. Our goals are to promote an active and self-reliant  lifestyle; to recognize when assistance is necessary; to provide caring  attention; and to continue to educate our community.

Living Options

Pacifica Senior Living Green Valley provides the most innovative healthcare solutions for senior living in Henderson, NV to our residents and their families. By embracing the latest research available, we have developed the best care solutions available for assisted living and memory care for seniors in Henderson.

Services and Amenities

Grandmother and grandaughter hugging enjoying our Pacifica Senior Living Services in Henderson.

Pacifica  Senior Living Green Valley is a gracious single story full-service  retirement community nestled among beautifully manicured grounds,  gardens, and walking paths.

We  encourage our residents to allow us (the staff) to assist them in any  way we can. We believe it is our residents’ turn to relax and enjoy  retirement living at its fullest. Our mission is to help them feel at  home each and every day.

In addition to the apartment home maintenance, we offer generous amenities and services.

Pacifica Senior Living Amenities Include:

  • A charming, gated community with a single story, cottage-style design – no long corridors, stairs or elevators.
  • 24-hour on-site professional staffing
  • Family-style dining – three times a day
  • Weekly housekeeping, linens and personal laundry
  • All utilities (phone at an additional fee)
  • Cable television
  • Scheduled transportation
  • Social, educational, spiritual, and recreational programs
  • Full service beauty salon (additional fee)
  • Access to comfortable indoor and outdoor leisure areas
  • Manicured and maintained landscaped grounds with water fountain
  • Expansive rose garden and walking paths
  • Library
  • Vibrant activities program-rose hall community center
  • On-site apartment home maintenance
  • Pets welcome! (additional fee)

Our separate, secured memory care community offers:

  • Personalized memory care in a secure, comfortable setting
  • 24 hour safety supervision and assistance
  • Daily programs to enhance resident engagement
  • Secure exterior courtyards specifically designed for resident outdoor experiences

Cottages of Green Valley

(702) 992-0000 

2620 Robindale Road 

Henderson

West of Pecos

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!