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terminal illness | Nevada Senior Guide

Circle of Life Community Hospice – Reno Nevada

August 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Reno 

www.colhospice.com

COL-Logo-New_CS6-2

Circle of Life Hospice helps people in the advanced stages of a chronic or terminal illness who have made the decision to live their remaining days with dignity and surrounded by compassionate caregivers. Our hospice team consists of nurses, aides, social workers, spiritual care advisers, physicians, volunteers, dietitians, therapists and bereavement counsel with that will facilitate helping you “live with” versus “dying from” an illness.

If we can help you see death through new eyes , it will help you to transform your grieving process and change how you view your world, forever.

We have learned from our patients that the Art of Living at the end of life is a time of life that can involve tremendous personal and spiritual growth.

Circle of Life Hospice

1575 Delucchi Lane,

Suite 214

Reno, NV 89502

775-827-2298

TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

 

Terry Murphy, a longtime local businesswoman and community leader who is president of Strategic Solutions and serves as president of Downtown Las Vegas Alliance, is the SHARE Humanitarian for the month of May for her volunteering efforts with Veterans Village, The Rape Crisis Center and the Variety Early Leaning Center Lorenzi Campus.TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

Murphy also serves as Honorary Consul for the Republic of Ireland and as a board member of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts.

 

Each month, SHARE honors those in the community who give without hesitation to help others in need. Murphy was selected for this honor from the more than 1,500 SHARE volunteers in Southern Nevada.

SHARE is involved with raising funds for various social causes including housing assistance and neighborhood support service programs.

 

About SHARE:

SHARE is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1994 by business executives dedicated to providing affordable housing for individuals in need. During its nearly 20 year history, the organization has served hundreds of families, seniors, veterans and those with physical challenges or terminal illnesses. sharelasvegas.org

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About The Rape Crisis Center:

The Rape Crisis Center (RCC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1974 by Florence McClure and Sandra Petta as the Community Action Against Rape (CAAR) with the goal of helping those in Clark County heal from the trauma of sexual violence. Today, The Rape Crisis Center operates a 24/7 crisis hot line for sexual assault victims and provides counseling, advocacy and support to help victims begin the healing process and navigate the legal system. The RCC is also committed to the prevention of sexual assault through educational programs and community outreach. To assist victims to become survivors, the organization depends on a core base of dedicated volunteers and staff. These individuals are empathetic and enthusiastic people who give their time, energy, and personal sacrifice to continue to serve Clark County’s victims of sexual violence. This service is provided through face-to-face and over-the- phone intervention with newly victimized individuals.The Rape Crisis Center hotline number is 888-366-1640.  For more information, visit www.therapecrisiscenter.org.

 

What to Do When – Etiquette Suggestions For Senior Citizens by Jerry Elrod

May 8, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens know that one of the contributors to Emily Post’s  success came when more and more people wanted to know how to behave in social  situations. Letters of inquiry launched a career, still a part of Americana. Her  answers became legend and law and revisions have been made as necessary  throughout the decades.

There are new questions today, necessitated by a changed and an ever changing  social environment. These questions arise as legitimately as they did when  persons wanted to know which fork to use.

But today’s questions have more to do with sensitivity to social crises than  to table manners. They are questions that come from every generation. No age  group is immune. Seniors, whose experience may be sharpened through years of  experience, are nonetheless often caught in situations new to them and are  frequently in need of advice.

Here are some of the surprises and dynamics that may confront us all:

Q: A friend sends an invitation to a wedding of one of their children. The  bride is pregnant and marrying someone of another ethnic background; how do you  handle it?

A: You handle it as you would any invitation. If you are available and wish  to attend, you reply accordingly. You purchase a gift which you have sent or  take to the occasion. You exercise 100% genuine courtesy, thoughtfulness and  participate as a friend who cares and is delighted to have been invited.

Q: Someone special in your circle, friend or family, is going through an  experience of terminal illness with someone in their family; how can you be  present to them during their uncertainty and pain?

A: Exercising compassion and presence is an absolute top of the list must.  Authentic presence, in body or not, is the best extension of caring there is.  Caring Bridge is a web site where many persons going through this experience are  available to receive messages of caring. Direct contact, without overdoing it,  is always welcomed. Telephone calls, timed appropriately, are very intimate and  personal. Greeting cards, offers for assistance, dropping by with a platter of  cookies are expressions of affection. Listening is the most precious gift of  all. Offering a shoulder follows that.

Q. Someone in your acquaintance has lost a significant portion of their  retirement nest egg. They aren’t sure what lies ahead, how can you be  helpful?

A. While you may not be in a position to rescue them from their financial  catastrophe, you can be in a position to assist strategizing with them a means  for coping and moving forward. It will be painful. It may offer some dead ends,  but their having someone to assist them to hold up the ceiling, when it feels as  if it is crashing in upon them, will be a gift beyond measure. It is the age old  story for senior citizens. Etiquette is another way of showing respect, offering  generosity and grace, especially when it takes into account the deepest respect  for and needs of others.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Elrod

 

How Much Have You Changed? A Dilemma For Senior Citizens by Jerry Elrod

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Now that you are 50 or 60 or 70 or so, how much have you changed? As a senior  citizen in retirement, do you still see yourself as you were 10 or more years  ago? What experiences, dramatic or subtle, have changed the mold you always saw  yourself fitting?

Here is an illustration giving proof that some people really don’t change  their patterns. A man in his early 70s is still acting out and living as if it  were 50 or more years ago. No change, no recognition of the need for it. Old  prejudices, bitter cynicism are the hallmarks of his life. Just as his outward  expressions reveal his inward retardation, he is being eaten alive by a terminal  illness. Is there anyway to get through to people who don’t even understand  themselves? How can exercise compassion and care and thoughtfulness for others,  if they don’t even see the need for those emotions within themselves?

This is an alert. It is time for aging senior citizens who have decided to  live in the boxed-in, never gonna change kind of existence, to either decide to  isolate themselves completely or change. Isolation is not desirable, at whatever  age. Punishing others by absenting yourself from the world going on around you  is only a punishment to yourself. It isn’t the rest of the world that has a  problem. It is you!

Resisting change is no indication of brilliance. It is instead, a sign of  insecurity, inability to cope, unwillingness to evolve. Do you really want to be  the way you have always been? Sounds comfortable, but at last it is an indicator  of disconnect. There are a lot of memories and joys from your past to which you  may cling. But, finally, one must admit they can’t remain forever a part of your  life and being. Right now, resolve to begin working hard on eliminating some of  the “things” which still hold you. There is a time for letting go.

It may be relatively easy, and certainly inevitable, to have to let go of  those “things.” It is more of a struggle to deal with the chains, as in Dickens’  Marley, which enslave us. Aging senior citizens may find a good read this Christmas in  “A Christmas Carol.” As you read it, reflect on how much like Marley or Ebenezer  you have become.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_Elrod

 

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!