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Part Four: Current and Future Anti-Aging Treatments

May 1, 2016 by · Comments Off on Part Four: Current and Future Anti-Aging Treatments
Filed under: General 

As previously noted, many anti-oxidants are essential nutrients. Natural anti-oxidants, like vitamin C and E, work synergistically. Anti-oxidants may be more effective if obtained from a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. Nutritionists recommend eating 6 or more daily servings of anti-oxidant rich fruits and vegetables. Everyone agrees the use of antioxidant supplements for anti-aging may be helpful, but there is no agreement on what the most effective supplement dosages should be.

Anti-aging medicine acknowledges that stress of all kinds causes aging but has not yet developed individualized treatment for this. There are countless sources of internal and external stress and individual stress levels vary greatly. One overlooked cause of internal stress is improper hydration. Water is essential in for the correct operation of many internal functions. Too little or too much water causes age producing stress. When one is old (80+) thirst perception declines and dehydration can easily set in. Other overlooked sources of stress are antioxidants themselves. High doses (or doses above certain yet unspecified amounts) of supplemental anti-oxidants are a known cause of stress.

To be helpful, antioxidant supplements must prevent other types of stress more than the stress they themselves create. Knowing the correct supplement dosages that can do this is an essential part of anti-aging treatment. A healthy young person in his twenties, who is properly nourished, will have less internal stress that an older individual in his sixties. For a young individual, lower amounts of antioxidants may be safer than higher amounts. A older person, whose many internal homeostatic mechanisms are less able to deal with internal stress, may benefit more from higher amounts of antioxidants. Theoretically an anti-oxidant based course of anti-ageing treatment will slow the rate at which cellular damage occurs. Cells will become “sick” more slowly. Over time, as fewer sick cells are replaced at a slower rate, the number of cells retaining longer telomere chains will be higher. You can then reasonably expect this to result in an increase in life expectancy. For now the recommended but imprecise approach to decrease the rate at which cellular damage occurs is to increase your per day intake of anti-oxidant rich fruits and vegetables, to slightly increase your intake of antioxidants, and to take various vitamins and small amounts of anti-aging supplements on a daily basis. One study has shown taking a good multivitamin supplement is associated with longer telomere length.

Ideally anti-aging treatment should to be fine tuned for each individual. The key here would be to measure and minimize the cumulative effects of different kinds of stress on an individual basis. Easily measurable practical bio-markers for various types of stress do not yet exist or are not being used. When they are used it will be easy to customize individual antioxidant dosages so that everyone have “optimum” levels throughout their life. “Optimum” levels would maintain a safe reserve of protective antioxidants in the body.

Next I will briefly discuss the most popular nutrients associated with anti-aging. The most popular of the anti-oxidants, vitamins, and nutrients often associated with good health and anti-aging include: beta-carotene (vitamin A), vitamin C, vitamin E, various Flavonoids,Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, Co-enzyme Q10, Lycopene, Selenium.

There are dozens of supplements that are known to effectively treat specific symptoms of old age. A few of the better known supplements include: DMAE, Acetyl-l-carnitine, L-carnosine, Alpha Lipoic Acid, DHEA, L-arginine, and melatonin

Good food contains some of the anti-oxidants previously mentioned. A few other popular foods associated with anti-aging include: Green Tea, turmeric, and red wine.

All of the above have unique biological properties and, in my opinion, are “good” for you if taken in small or moderate amounts. Some (ex. vitamin C) may also be “good” for you in larger amounts. Various studies on each of these may conflict with each other. You need to carefully research each substance on your own but researchers have already found several nutrients to be associated with longer than average telomere lengths. These include: Green Tea, Omega-3, Vitamins A, C, D, and E.

Vitamin E has been associated with telomere lengthening anti-aging properties.

Green tea contains many antioxidants, including vitamin C, E and flavenoids.Flavenoids form a large antioxidant class (including catechins and quercetin) that has many anticarcinogenic, antihypercholesterolemic, antibacterial, (helps prevent dental caries), and anti-inflammatory properties. The leaves of the tea plant are rich in polyphenols. The consumption of 3 cups or more of green tea daily has been associated with longer than average telomere length.

The Omega-3s are essential long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids that are anti-inflammatory and help prevent heart disease, stroke, memory loss, depression, arthritis, cataract, cancer. Omega-3s slow down the shortening of telomeres; i.e. they may protect against aging on a cellular level.

Vitamin C is an abundant internal water soluble antioxidant that protects cellular components against free-radical formation caused by pollution and cigarette smoke. Many studies have associated high vitamin C intakes with lower rates of cancer of the mouth, larynx and esophagus. Vitamin C has shown promise in treating premature aging and possibly aging itself.

Due to limitations on the number of links I can incorporate into this article I could not provide more reference links supporting the preceding paragraphs. If interested please email me at the email address shown at the end of this article and I will forward them to you.

The sooner you start some sort of anti-aging treatment the better but it is never too late to start. All real treatments will help you maintain a longer than average average telomere chain length.

The goal of the programmed death theory of aging is to address the root causes of aging. This goal includes attempts to slow or reverse the telomere shortening process. Two such treatments are: TA 65 and human genetic engineering.

TA 65 is a telomerase activating product produced and marketed by Sierra Sciences. The key ingredient in TA 65 is Astragalus, a plant extract known to have telomerase activation properties. The product may work but I do not recommend it for several reasons. TA 65 is too expensive for the average person. A number of expensive health spas incorporate TA 65 in their programs. Again these are financially beyond the reach of the average person. The marketing tactics of Sierra Sciences have been questioned by many and there are law suits pending against TA 65.

The big issue I have with TA 65 is one of scientific honesty. The company genetically engineered mice that allowed telomerase to be switched off and on at an early age. TA 65 was able to switch telomerase back on in these mice and allowed them to live normal lives. http://www.nature.com/news/2010/101128/full/news.2010.635.html

Using this to show how effective TA65 treatment is, is dishonest. This is not how telomerase normally works and there was no real extension of the lifespan beyond what it would have been without the genetic modification. In normal mice the effects of TA65 were temporary and little or no life extension was seen. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/04/11/anti-aging-pill-new-study-on-ta-65-sparks-controversy.html

Human genetic engineering is the real answer to fighting and defeating aging. It can directly address the root causes of aging. Advances in this area (ex. CRISPR) allow DNA base pairs to be inserted or deleted at specific place in our DNA. This means the human genome can now be precisely edited as needed. The lifespan of old mice has been modestly increased using telomerase gene therapy. In humans gene modification therapy has frequently been used for various medical problems. On September 15, 2015, Elizabeth Parrish was the first human to undergo anti-aging gene therapy. Anti-aging treatments will rapidly advance as our knowledge of the specifics of the human genome grows.

Current general social-political attitudes seem to be favoring the further development of anti-aging research. There are no international recognized political programs to stop aging or extend life but since 2012 a few pro-immortality political parties have sprung up. Their aim is to support anti-aging and life extension research, and to help provide access to advances in these areas to everyone. Among the numerous organizations supporting anti-aging research, the SENS (Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence) organization has come up with an anti-aging research plan. They want to develop anti-aging therapies to repair most forms of cellular damage. SENS, is a charitable organization. Any anti-aging advances resulting from funding it provides will become readily available public knowledge. In addition to the normal scientific research there is the $1,000,00 Palo Alto Longevity Prize that is being offered to anyone who can come up with an effective anti-aging treatment.

As of 2015, all known anti-aging treatments are only partially effective. Depending on when one starts a comprehensive anti-aging program, one can probably extend one’s life by 10 to 25 years. Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health estimated that an anti-aging lifestyle can add 24.6 more productive years to one’s lifespan. Anti-aging knowledge increases at a rate of about 10 times every 10 years. This probably means that for many of us there is more than enough time to reap the anticipated benefits in anti-aging research. One day soon, aging, like many other diseases, will be cured. While we wait for those anti-aging technological singularities to occur the name of the game is to ensure we stay healthy long enough repeat their benefits.

As a former engineer I have a strong affinity to all sciences including biology.

My interests include following advances in the fields of anti-aging, health and nutrition. Rapid advances in these areas will vanquish the disease we call aging.
Through my articles and website I want to help you maintain your good health for the next 10 to 25 years. I believe this can be done by a daily program that includes moderate exercise, a healthy diet that includes vitamins and related supplements, and taking advantage of any advances in related research. My hope is that within the next 25 years or less, the fruits of anti-aging research will become available to everyone.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9239681

The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

January 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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11723Living with diabetes? Watch your mouth!

 

(Family Features)  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with diabetes are two times more likely to develop gum disease. In fact, about one-third of people with diabetes have severe gum disease.

 

Why are those with diabetes more vulnerable to gum disease? High blood glucose levels impair the body’s ability to heal from oral infections and uncontrolled diabetes can make treating gum disease more difficult, according to the American Diabetes Association. The Association is joining with Colgate to launch a new “Watch Your Mouth!” campaign to help raise awareness surrounding the often over-looked link between oral health and diabetes. Here are some tips to help you live well with diabetes:

 

  • Watch your mouth! Begin to develop healthy oral care habits, like brushing, flossing and visiting the dentist regularly. Research shows that brushing twice a day with Colgate Total toothpaste can help improve gum health in as little as four weeks.*
  • Don’t miss out on your favorite foods. Just eat healthier versions that everyone in your family can enjoy. Making simple substitutions to most dishes can help increase nutritional value, while not sacrificing on taste.
  • Use the right tools. Stay organized with a journal large enough to keep your diet, exercise, goals and health information together. Keep a week’s worth of prescriptions in one place with a handy pill case.
  • Know your risks. The American Diabetes Association lists the common risk factors for diabetes as being 45 or older, being overweight, not exercising regularly, having high blood pressure and being a part of certain racial and ethnic groups.
  • Visit your dentist. While your doctor and certified diabetes educator play an important role in helping with your diabetes, so does your dentist. If you don’t see a private-practice dentist, you can visit dental schools that provide services at a fraction of the cost to help you keep your mouth healthy.

 

For more expert tips and information, visit www.OralHealthAndDiabetes.com.

 

*Results improve with continued twice daily use, as shown in 6 month clinical studies of the general population.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Keep it simple to move seniors successfully

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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According to experts, from 2000 until 2011, senior citizens 65 years and older grew nearly 18 percent, up to 41.4 million. Nearly 81 percent of that age group owned homes at the end of 2011.

Children and families of the Baby Boomer generation — people born between 1946 and 1960 — will soon find themselves helping elderly loved ones move.

Moving a senior family member is challenging. No one wants to upset that person, and everyone wants the move to go as smoothly as possible. This can sometimes seem like an impossible task.

The important thing to remember when moving a senior is to stay organized and calm throughout the move, say the experts at TWO MEN AND A TRUCK®. When moving a senior into a living facility, consider contacting management to find out what can be brought onto the campus, what are appropriate moving hours, and do they have any best practices for the move.

Remember:

  • Start packing several weeks in advance. Pack early to avoid being overwhelmed as moving day draws near.
  • Wrap small items in colored paper. This prevents items such as knick-knacks from becoming lost or thrown out.
  • Label boxes on top and sides. Mark the top and sides of boxes as they’re packed. Make sure to label boxes containing breakable or sentimental items with “fragile.”
  • Pack all electronic equipment in original boxes. Otherwise use low-static bubble wrap when packing these items
  • Always use packing paper. When wrapping fine china and precious items, the ink from printed newsprint may bleed onto valuables.
  • Sealing all boxes with packing tape. This makes it easier to stack and protect belongings.
  • Use boxes designed for the items you are packing. Use dish pack boxes for dishes and wardrobe boxes for clothing.

TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® is the largest franchised moving company both in the United States and internationally. Currently there are more than 240 national locations and 1,500 trucks operating in the U.S.; in total, the company operates 260 locations and 1,600 trucks. TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® has performed more than 4.5 million moves since its inception in 1985. The company has seen consistent monthly growth dating back to December 2009 and more than 20 months of double-digit growth. Each location is independently owned and operated. Visit twomenandatruck.com.

Contact: Dawn Kroeger
dawn.kroeger@twomen.com
(517) 803-2901

Study Shows that People Who Undergo Cataract Surgery to Correct Visual Impairment Live Longer

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Australian researchers find a 40 percent lower mortality risk among patients who had their vision corrected through the procedure  

SAN FRANCISCO – Sept. 4, 2013 – People with cataract-related vision loss who have had cataract surgery to improve their sight are living longer than those with visual impairment who chose not to have the procedure, according to an Australian cohort study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. After comparing the two groups, the researchers found a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk in those who had the surgery.

The research is drawn from data gathered in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, a population-based cohort study of vision and common eye diseases in an older Australian population. A total of 354 persons aged 49 years and older and diagnosed with cataract-related vision impairment –  some of whom had undergone surgery and others who had not – were assessed between 1992 and 2007. Adjustments were made for age and gender as well as a number of mortality risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, smoking, cardiovascular disease, body mass index and measures of frailty and comorbid disease. Follow-up visits took place after five and ten years since the baseline exam.

Previous research had indicated that older persons with visual impairment were likely to have greater mortality risk than their age peers with normal vision, and that cataract surgery might reduce this risk. These studies – unlike the Blue Mountains Eye Study – compared people who had undergone cataract surgery with those in the general population or with those who had not had cataract surgery, and did not link vision status to the surgical status.

“Our finding complements the previously documented associations between visual impairment and increased mortality among older persons,” said Jie Jin Wang, Ph.D., of the Westmead Millennium Institute and one of lead researchers of the study. “It suggests to ophthalmologists that correcting cataract patients’ visual impairment in their daily practice results in improved outcomes beyond that of the eye and vision, and has important impacts on general health.”

The association between correction of cataract-related visual impairment and reduced mortality risk is not clearly understood, but plausible factors may include improvements in physical and emotional well-being, optimism, greater confidence associated with independent living after vision improvement, as well as greater ability to comply with prescription medications.

Dr. Wang noted one limitation of the study is that participants with cataract-related visual impairment who did not have cataract surgery could have had other health problems that prevented them from undergoing surgery, and that these other health problems could partly explain the poorer survival among non-surgical participants. This issue is addressed by the researchers in a subsequent study.

Caused by the clouding of the lens, cataract is a leading cause of treatable visual impairment that will affect more than half of all Americans by the time they are 80 years old.[1]  Surgical removal of the opaque lens with an artificial lens implanted is a successful procedure of cataract treatment. If completing everyday tasks is difficult, cataract surgery should be discussed with an ophthalmologist − a medical doctor specializing in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions.

Seniors who are seeking eye care but are concerned about cost may qualify for EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which offers eye exams and care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors age 65 and older. Learn more at www.eyecareamerica.org. For more information on cataracts and other eye health information, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology 
The American Academy of Ophthalmology, headquartered in San Francisco, is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons — Eye M.D.s — with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who has the education and training to treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trusted and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology, the official journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, publishes original, peer-reviewed, clinically applicable research. Topics include the results of clinical trials, new diagnostic and surgical techniques, treatment methods technology assessments, translational science reviews and editorials.

End Holiday Gatherings with a Slice of Decadence

October 31, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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(Family Features) Savoring a flavorful, homemade pie is the perfect way to end any gathering during the holidays. While apple, pecan and pumpkin are go-to favorites this time of year, introducing holiday-inspired flavor twists is perfect for those who crave a little variety.

 

“You’ll love the smooth layers of rich chocolate and the crunch of pecans seasoned with cinnamon and allspice in this easy-to-make pecan pie,” said Mary Beth Harrington of the McCormick Kitchens. “I like to bring this pie as a hostess gift, too – the additional ingredients give it a unique, memorable touch.”

 

Make any pie holiday-worthy by topping each piece with an extra-special homemade whipped cream flavored with Vanilla Extract. Try other festive varieties like candy cane, cocoa cinnamon and eggnog.

 

For more holiday-inspired recipes, visit www.McCormick.com, www.Facebook.com/McCormickSpice, or www.Pinterest.com/mccormickspices.

 

Decadent Chocolate Pecan Pie

Serves: 10

 

1          refrigerated pie crust, (from 14.1-ounce package)

1          cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

3          tablespoons milk

4          eggs

3          tablespoons butter, melted

2          teaspoons McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract

1          cup dark corn syrup

1          cup sugar

1/2       teaspoon McCormick® Ground Cinnamon

1/4       teaspoon McCormick® Ground Allspice

1/4       teaspoon salt

1 1/2    cups pecan halves

1.      Preheat oven to 425°F. Line 9-inch deep dish pie plate with pie crust. Bake 7 minutes. Remove crust from oven. Reduce oven temperature to 325°F.

2.      Meanwhile, microwave chocolate chips and milk in medium microwavable bowl on HIGH 1 to 1 1/2 minutes. Stir until smooth. Pour chocolate evenly over crust.

3.      Beat eggs in large bowl. Add remaining ingredients; mix well. Slowly pour mixture over chocolate layer. Place ring of foil around edges of crust to prevent over-browning.

4.      Bake 55 to 60 minutes or until filling is puffed and center is still soft enough to move when shaken gently. Cool completely on wire rack.

Holiday-Flavored Whipped Toppings

 

For Vanilla Whipped Cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar and 1 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form.

 

For Candy Cane Whipped Cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar, 1/2 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract and 1/4 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Peppermint Extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form.

 

For Cocoa Cinnamon Whipped Cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 2 teaspoons unsweetened cocoa powder,1/2 teaspoon McCormick® Ground Cinnamon and 1/2 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form.

 

For Eggnog Whipped Cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 1/2 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract, 1/4 teaspoon McCormick® Ground Nutmeg and 1/4 teaspoon McCormick® Imitation Rum Extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form.

 

 

 

 

 

Senior Citizen Travel – Baby Boomer Adventure Made Simple by Susan Elizabeth

October 1, 2013 by · Comments Off on Senior Citizen Travel – Baby Boomer Adventure Made Simple by Susan Elizabeth
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Expert Author Susan Elizabeth

Many people think that when they get to the age of retirement that their opportunity for adventure is over. But the baby boomer generation is an entirely different breed of retiree. They are one of the groups that has made senior citizen travel such a huge and growing ever bigger segment of the travel industry.

There are in fact, probably more travel companies now who specialize in taking older travelers on travel adventures than have ever been in existence before. Part of the reason for this is that there are so many baby boomers; and so many baby boomers who think young, act young and live young.

And part of it is because so many of the baby boomer generation have a little bit of extra money to spend on taking cool trips.

One of the growing sub segments of the travel industry, specifically in the senior travel part is genealogical travel. This is where people want to go back to the country of their family origin to see what life is like back there. Although, this kind of travel focuses on foreign destinations, there are plenty of travel opportunities in the genealogical sector that will allow you to travel to the parts of the US where your family was originally from.

Maybe this is so popular because so many baby boomers were so independently minded growing up that they moved away from their family home, and maybe just because many of the parents and grandparents of the people who are boomers came from other countries. Either way, this is a big deal in travel and if it is something you are interested in, you can easily find all sorts of travel agencies who can help you out with a genealogical travel tour to investigate your own roots.

Another kind of travel that is very popular with baby boomer folks is small group travel. Often in regular travel tours, especially the tour packages, there are as many as a hundred people in the same tour group. And if you are not on a cruise, this is way too many.

The tour companies do this to cut down on the amount of overhead they have to pay the tour guides and the hotels. You will still have to pay whatever fees they charge but you will not get the same amount of personal attention that you would in a small group tour situation. Make sure you check out the tour group size before you book your tour.

Senior citizen travel is alive and well and isn’t going anywhere. As a baby boomer traveler, you can find as many travel opportunities online as you can search for. And more just keep appearing each and every day.

Susan is a full fledged baby boomer and avid internet researcher who writes about baby boomer travel and other senior topics on her site at www.second50years.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Susan_Elizabeth

Benefits of Cayenne For Senior Citizens’ Diets by Sharon Elrod

September 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Expert Author Sharon Elrod

Alternative and Complementary treatments are finally getting some long overdue recognition. Senior citizens have been among the groups of people lobbying for non-traditional medical treatment of disease. One of those non-traditional methodologies is the use of herbal medicine. Among the herbs getting appropriate accolades these days is Cayenne.

Most of us think of it as a hot pepper, added to soup and sauces for the tangy taste it offers. But Cayenne has healing power that is now being studied in a variety of medical centers. Aryuvedic medicine has known of its curative power for centuries. Folklore describes its healing effects on heart attacks, open wounds, pain, hemorrhaging and digestion. And now medical science is adding its official stamp on the benefits of the herb with studies focusing on the therapeutic benefit of this hot peppe.

The active component of Cayenne is capsaicin. Do an Internet search on that word alone, and you will be amazed at the results. Clinical studies on Cayenne/capsaicin have found many medicinal benefits including antioxidant activity, cytotoxic action, inhibit some cancer cell growth, alleviate oral mucositis pain, treating psoriasis and pruritus, and other benefits.

The great thing about Cayenne is its nutritional value as well as medicinal. This herb is used extensively in all kinds of culinary dishes. Seniors around the globe are beginning to add this herb to many dishes that do not call for it. The addition creates a delight for most palates! When used in combination with other herbs, it acts as a catalyst that increases the effectiveness of other herbs used in the same dishes.

The nutritional value of Cayenne comes from its very high source of Vitamins A and C, the complete B complexes, and its high levels of organic calcium and potassium, which is one of the reasons it is good for the heart.

Readers are encouraged to check further on the validity of information available on the Internet. Bibliographies offer a comprehensive resource on reports of studies. Readers are always encouraged to read the original source to avoid possible misrepresentation, even that offered in good faith. As always, this article is not intended to offer medical advice or to replace the need for all readers to consult their primary care physicians and specialists about their individual medical needs.

Article provided by Sharon Shaw Elrod. Senior Citizen Journal, Your Partner in Productive Aging, provides current and relevant information on topics of interest to seniors. Please visit my web site at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sharon_Elrod

A Comprehensive Look At Senior Citizens Travel by Bruce A. Hoover

August 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Expert Author Bruce A. Hoover

Travel is becoming popular among many groups of people. Children are traveling more with their parents, teens are traveling more in groups and people who thought they could not afford to travel are traveling more now because of the availability of so many deals! Senior citizens travel too and today, they are traveling more than ever!

In the past, only seniors who had a substantial retirement savings were able to travel. Today, there are so many deals and opportunities for cheap, quality travel that anyone, including seniors on a budget can see the world without going broke!

Some destinations are cheaper than others such as the Caribbean, Mexico and some countries in Europe. Of course, there are many places to see in your own backyard and The United States and Canada are no exception where deals are concerned. Just like there are cheaper destinations, there are also cheaper methods of travel. Cruising is a great way to see many different parts of the world at a low price and all-inclusive Caribbean vacations are great deals as well.

If you are a senior looking for a great travel deal, there are many things you can do to maximize your chances of finding the best deal. First, ask around. You never know what you might find out from friends and family members who have traveled recently. Do a thorough internet search and sign up for travel deal newsletters that allow you to be among the first to find out about deals. Start looking for your trip and book your trip as early as possible in order to get the best savings.

If you put the proper amount of time and effort into your search, you will have no problem the right vacation for you at the right price and next thing you know, you will be on your way to relax and have some fun in a place you have always wanted to see!

Next, now that you understand how you can get inexpensive senior citizens travel will you take advantage of it?

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bruce_A._Hoover

Senior Citizens Moving – How to Decide If It’s Time to Move by Jennifer Strong

August 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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senior-citizen-moving

At what time rearranging, it is significant to remember that who will be moving, not only when and where the move will be happening. This is very important, as some people need a little bit extra in the approach of preparation and accommodation when it comes to the huge method that is moving. Senior citizens, as, often need additional time and a bit more consideration when going through the procedure than people of a younger generation. Here are five very essential moving tips to make moving with seniors in exacting much easier and simpler.

1. Take a Time Out – The news that you will be moving is a huge shock to the system. You might be able to handle it, but seniors have a hard time adjusting to the thought that their whole world is about to be turned upside down. It can obtain time to get used to the detail that they will be moving before the procedure can move onward. Make sure that you take a time out and explain all of the ins and outs of the move and the reasoning behind it to the senior in question before you ever start down the road to a successful move.

2. Get them Involved – When you do start working on making the overall moving process a successful one, make sure that you get them involved in all of the decisions that have to be made. This is important, as the move will be for them, and they should have a say in how things are done. This will also set out a long way to building the senior in difficulty feel as if they are being useful and adding to the procedure rather than being an obstacle.

3. Research is Everything – Every move requires research in order to find the best deals and the best companies, but when you are moving with a senior, it might take a little bit extra. On occasion, it is an excellent thing to discover a company that will go the additional mile to assist the senior think as if their belongings are going to be cared for with the highest care, and a friendly company is not at all something that will be onwards.

4. Plan Ahead – Seniors are normally on an unchanging income, and so, they might desire to know how they will be paying for the move. This is important, as an out of control senior can suffer when they feel as if their own lives are not within their control. Make sure to write everything out so that it can be easily viewed at any time during the process.

5. Make a Budget – Seniors are often on a fixed income, and as such, they might want to know how they will be paying for the move. It is important that you set of contacts a moving financial plan, even if you will be serving to give for the move. This will assist them see where the funds is coming from, as well as where it is departing and when it is appropriate. It will also help you both locate areas where money might be saved along the way.

Moving is a complex event, especially when you are including seniors or other special needs people in the process. It is possible to have an enjoyable and simple move, no matter who is moving. Confirm to use these simple tips in order to assurance that your move goes effortlessly.

MovingCompanies.us is an official source of moving information. Here you can find local moving company near you. If you are moving to another state, here you can find free online estimate from a Florida moving company in your area.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jennifer_Strong

A Senior Citizen In Juvenile Hall by Eva Fry

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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It was my first time speaking at Juvenile Hall, I was terrified! I had seen enough movies to know I didn’t want to be there. As I hurried through the metal detectors, and pushed through the big metal doors, my heart was pounding and I was filled with fear. I wondered if I would get out of this place alive.

I passed the holding tanks, rooms with big windows containing kids who had just been arrested. In there were kids pacing, fighting addictions, fearfully waiting to be assigned to a unit. Some kids were right at home. They knew this place! They had been there before.

When I stepped into the inner sanctum I heard sounds that confirmed my fears. Angry kids were screaming, using profane language. I heard loud pounding on the doors, which dotted the narrow hallways. Juvenile inmates were communicating through the thick cement walls. As I scurried along, I saw empty eyes piercing out at me through the small, eye level windows of their rooms. I passed through more metal doors and hallways, until I came to the unit I was to speak in. Inside sat fifty young men, of all nationalities. I knew from their varying hair color. Their backs were toward me. They were juveniles from the age of 15 to 17.

As I slowly walked to the front of the room, I made sure there was a guard on either side, in case one of them grabbed me. I took a deep breath and turned toward them. My heart stopped! I was shocked! They were just kids! I expected them to look like criminals, but they looked like they could be one of my nine grandkids.

Although some did appear tough, and others rough, there was something about them that touched me. At that moment, my life changed! A still small voice inside me said, “you must try to help them!”

Thus began my continuing, nine-year mission, to help kids who are in trouble with the law. These are my kids. “The Forgotten Kid.” The children we think we can lock up, throw away the key, and forget. The ones who learned most of the bad things they have done, from us, the older generation. They are kids, paying the price for the sins of society. Our scapegoats

There are up to 600 kids locked up, in this facility, at any time. The Hall houses kids from the age of 10 to 18, although I saw a nine-year and ten-year-old carrying blankets and pillows. Were they going camping?
No! They were headed to their rooms, to be locked up, for armed robbery.

BE A WINNER IN LIFE IS MY PROGRAM. I help the kids believe they can still be WINNERS. I teach them they have potential to do amazing things with their life. In fact, I believe God sent them to this earth to do good with their lives. I tell them each one is a genius, in their own way, and can do something better than anyone else can do. They must find their genius. They must go to school, obey the law, obey their parents, be honest and work hard. My goal is to share with them the same truths I taught my kids: the basic truths of right and wrong.

I hope to support the parents who are good parents, but their kids got on the wrong track. I try to teach the ones with bad parents, or no parents, values they were never taught: basic principals of good and bad.

How did I start speaking at Juvenile Hall? It began a long time ago, when I was a little girl, the daughter of an alcoholic father who emotionally damaged my mother and us kids. I grew up in circumstances similar to some of these young wards.

I speak to them because I would have loved to have had someone, who cared, talk to me when I was young.

Some of these kids, like me, are the off spring of parents who didn’t care how their actions affected their kids. We were from homes full of contention caused by parents with addictions. Sick parents who were unable to control their own lives, let alone parent a child. So-called parents, who lived in their own hell and created havoc in the lives of their children. Parents who abandoned their kids.

When I talk to the kids, I relate to the ones who hope to fix their parents, and those who must care for their siblings. I relate because I remember pouring my Dad’s alcohol down the drain, thinking it would fix our problems but instead, I got myself into lots of trouble. I remember taking money from my Dad’s pocket, after he passed out, to give to my Mom. Money for food.

I remember the day I realized that whatever I did at home would change nothing. I would never have the loving family I longed for. Like many of these kids, I turned to friends for the family I needed. Like them, they were usually the wrong kids of friends, peers who were doing bad things. I remember drinking alcohol, even though I hated it, so I could fit in.

I hear my same story, over and over again, at Juvenile Hall.

To help them I share a profound truth, which I discovered in my young life. “Bad things happen for a reason!”

My bad thing: after a wasted life, at the age of 57, my Dad died an alcoholic. His drink of choice was 100% over proof rum. The good thing: My Dad’s death led to me realize I didn’t want to end up like him, or give my kids the life he gave me. I eventually made a commitment to stop drinking and change my life. Thankfully I was young and not an alcoholic, like my Father and Grandfather.

My commitment worked! I share with them how wonderfully my life has turned out, because of one small choice. I used my Dad’s mistakes to choose a better life for myself. I now have the life I dreamed about. My husband and I have been happily married for 45 years and with our children and grandchildren, are a close knit, happy, non-drinking family.

I tell them, “you can turn the bad things which have happened in your life into motivation for a better life too.” I help them believe they still have time to change.

Another reason I speak at Juvenile Hall is because I was a victim of a drunk driver. At the age of 17, the car I was riding in was hit head-on by a drunk driver. My head went through the windshield. My nose and part of my ear was torn off. Thankfully doctors put me back together, but I came to realize the terrible carnage alcohol could cause. I’ve had a mission all my life to teach the evils of alcohol use. I was a speaker for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving for several years. In fact, they were the ones who first sent me to speak at Juvenile Hall.

I teach the kids to abstain from alcohol and drugs. I have commitment cards, which I encourage them to sign and honor. I know if I can help them make a commitment not to drink alcohol, or use drugs; they will have a better chance at changing their lives and reaching their potential. They don’t need alcohol or drugs in their life. Most of the kids are locked up because of their first drink of alcohol, which lead to drug use and criminal behavior.

One of the questions people always ask me is “what is it like to talk to young criminals? Do they listen to you?”

My answer is, “at first it took a little time to know what to say and how to say it, so they would accept me. It took me time to overcome my fear of knowing how to communicate with them and have them accept me.”

One night, one of them asked, “why do you come to Juvenile Hall?” I answered, “why do you think?” His response, “for the money!” I replied, “no one pays me, in fact the first time I spoke, someone stole the hub caps from my car.” His mouth fell open and then he really listened to my program.

I’m happy to say I do very well with them! The kids are very attentive. They know I care. I don’t judge them. In most cases, I don’t know what their crime is. I don’t want to know. I tell them that what they have done is wrong and they must pay the price. On the other hand, I hope to stop them from getting deeper into crime. If I can stop them from hurting someone in the future, I feel my time is worthwhile.

I know I won’t get through to all of them, but I hope to plant seeds, which may take root someday when they have choices to make. My dream is to save as many as I can.

It is very gratifying when I feel I have gotten through to them and when they thank me. One boy said. “You told me bad things happen for a reason. Your right!” I never would have gotten an education if I hadn’t come to Juvenile Hall. I just got my GED. I applied to a college and was accepted. I will be going to school to be come an engineer when I get out.”

I am happy when I feel I have helped them look at life in a more positive way.

I try to help them turn their mistakes and bad experiences into something good. My greatest success is that I encourage the kids at Juvenile Hall to write letters to save other kids from the consequences they are experiencing. They have written incredible letters. Their letters have great impact on other kids because they come from their peers. My latest book “Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids contain the letters.

Here are inserts from some of the letters:

Addiction controlled my life. Don’t let it control you! I wish for all you guys to be safe, and I pray for you kids that don’t know what life is really about, because after that second when you make the bad decision, it goes down hill from there. Only you can change your future. I hope you all understand that there’s a number in prison with your name on it, if you don’t change. Now’s the time to change. Not later. Not when you get out, but now! If you don’t change now you never will.

Gang banging was my worst thing I ever gotten into. If I could take it back, I would. I repeated my Dad’s cycle.

Now I sit here in a one-room cell, facing 25 years to life. I want you to look around and see what kind of situation you’re in. Open you eyes and your minds and soak as much education as you can. I’m 17 years old in a couple of weeks. I will be graduating from high school (in Juvenile Hall). Education is the key to life.

I’m in the Hall, Unit 800. Why? Because I committed a sin while I was on drugs. At the age of 13, I started using drugs because my best friend was asking me to try some. At the age of 16, my charges are DUI, evading a peace officer, driving at an unsafe speed with no license, a firearm in the car and 187 murder.

All the violence that is going on in our community is not solving nothing. The only thing it’s doing is killing us off, one by one. Before you know it the human race will be extinct. Because we are the last of the dying breed. I’m only telling you this so you guys can make the right decision. Your homies probably say they are down for you, but they be faking, and that’s real. The only people that’s going to stick by you is your mama and your family. I seen too much in my life young homies and it’s not what you are thinking. I lost my little homie and that really hit me. All that was on my mind was retaliation but when I thought about it, I knew it wouldn’t bring him back so I thought of another game plan. I prayed!

Eva, I want to thank you for all the help that you have given me. All the little words you’ve spoken in your groups have helped me so much along the way. I have changed in ways that people wouldn’t believe. I have done a whole 360. Without the help of you, I see the change being 100% more difficult. I wish my family was around to see my new life.

As you can see, my experience with my kids, at Juvenile Hall, has been emotionally rewarding and very satisfying to me. These kids give my life meaning. I feel I am making a difference.

I continue to try to help kids. I have written a book called “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”, which I hope to get into the hands of every child in Juvenile Hall’s, all over the country. Also, I want to get it into the hands of parents. I hope to get to kids before they are locked up.

Yes I’m a grateful to be a senior citizen at Juvenile Hall! I’m grateful my senior years have value and that I am doing something with my time, which is worthwhile.

I now know that every senior citizen can use the wisdom they have gained throughout their life to make a difference. We can all do something. I encourage you to find a way to help a child. Our kids need you!

Eva Fry is an author, singer/songwriter and motivational speaker. She had a ten year volunteer program at Juvenile Hall called “Be a Winner in Life” She has three books “You Must Have a Dream” for seniors, “Be a Winner in Life” for kids, troubled kids and their parents, and Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids” – for all kinds, especially those who are locked up and to help kids from being locked up. She started writing and songwriting at the age of 60. Her goal is to encourage seniors to reach their potential and help kids do the same. She has many free articles on her web site to help young and old. She has six CD’s which are spiritually based and inspire young and old. She is avilable as a speaker or performer. Her work is available on her web site Eva Fry – eva@evafry.com http://www.evafry.com ( She has many free articles on her web site)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Even Senior Citizens Can Make Money From Adsense by Christopher Kyalo

May 30, 2013 by · Comments Off on Even Senior Citizens Can Make Money From Adsense by Christopher Kyalo
Filed under: Articles 

For senior citizens the really good news is that one can never be too old to make money from Adsense. And like any other online opportunity Google Adsense’s strict terms and conditions do not include an upper age limit.

In fact senior citizens willing to learn in their old age and also to shrug off things that they may have believed in too closely, in the past, AdSense is the perfect way for them to make money. This is because when a person has reached that age, there are plenty of useful experiences and skills that they have picked up over the years. It should not be too difficult finding what they experiences and skills that a senior citizen can mine to make money from Adsense.

Senior citizens usually love to reminisce over their long lives and past experiences both good and bad and this can be used to make money from Adsense. This is because this is just the sort of ingredients that can go to setting up a fascinating AdSense blog. These are usually the sort of personal experience blogs that have a huge potential of picking up traffic pretty quickly. Everybody knows that high traffic on an AdSense blog is a license to print money.

Nothing should really be a hindrance to senior citizens joining the ranks of those who make serious money from Adsense.

Find out how you can learn more about the best Adsense make money secrets from an expert who makes over $19,000 a month from Adsense. Or grab my ezine on Adsense secrets for free by sending a blank email now to clickaffiliatesecrets-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Christopher_Kyalo

Final Expense Life Insurance: Life Insurance Agent Lures Senior Citizen Inside A Decaying Casket by Donald Yerke

May 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

The sale of final expense life insurance opens up dormant prospects. Final expense life insurance representatives employ intense selling techniques  with a senior.

Looking confident but insecure, the sales agents feature dollar symbol  tattoos etched upon their chests. Typically enlarged eyes like low-cost red neon  glare as their looks show signs of being famished. In spite of this, these  indicated company agents resemble an assassin centering in on the newly  generated money target… a senior citizen.

Just about any older senior citizen has gained ample deep-rooted ability by  encounters with nonstop sellers. Stricken by a sales figure quota, the sales  agent keeps trying to hack continuously for sales closings. Stabilizing in for  improved position gets him shifting backward, bordering on dropping back just  like a gunshot hare.

The sales agent gives his best presentation. All the same, in all certainty  this is absolutely not a quick game, yet this still is an important matter of  life and death..By this time many newer career agents get raindrops of anxiety  arising swifter than the countless stars in the sky.

The retired weakened senior catches his breath and then takes an object out  of his new sweater zippered pocket. Out from an undersized vial of  prescriptions, he removes a singular one, more shrunken than an upsetting bug.  Without water to drink, the speck of the potent nitrate is centered then below  his tongue.

Wonder overwhelms the representative, now aware that this is absolutely  without doubt no chunk of sweet stuff. Making a response, the senior citizen  starts commenting in a gentle scratchy vocal tone. He replies it was a nitrate  pill as previously he had sustained a congestive heart stoppage. Flowing words & phrases bring figures of a full-length account of health circumstances.  Then a smile glows, as a gesture to the agent to dismiss the final expense life  insurance.

No doubt he had completely been outdone. How could this retiree still be  persuaded even if he rips the paperwork form from the agent’s possession?   His  plans of a high demanding canned sales recital turns to a grinding halt. The  newer agent is mum. And then finally he knows that letting a client feel being  in a burial place is absolutely cold.

On this occasion with the mild light wind, the conversation adjusts to one of  interactive mutual interest. The topic is fishing.. This improved topic  activates passion, even if at points the vastness of trophy fish landed most  certainly appeared to be expanded.

This newer agent notices how swiftly the chitchat among the two flows back & forth. Maybe securing the respect of the potential purchaser to approve of  you is much more gainful than fighting disputes? Perhaps confidence evolves into  being as potent as facts and results?

Closely after comes a move surprising the agent, similar to a creepy  cockroach unveiled to a spotlight. The older senior citizen pulls from inside  his wallet a picture of his individual grandchild. Next gently nudging the sales  agent he asks, “Will you tell me of the final expense life  insurance?”

The company agent holds to  his very greedy wants only,. Not at any time does  he inform the senior that the final expense life insurance coverage will  absolutely be turned down. Still, much like a crafty rat in an infested attic,  he scurries finding the insurance application. The good man even asks for being  insured for the greatest amount. Not even finishing the all-important paperwork  form, the trustworthy big-bellied new buyer goes into a far end passageway.  Reappearing, his fist is skintight encircling a roll of cash.

Close to drooling, the agent needs this newest purchaser to merely sign the  policy application. Arriving at the office later, the agent knows the final  expense life insurance application is not truly guaranteed issue. Quickly he  makes an unusual decision. The sales agent, very low on funds, decides to  swindle the $700.00 and destroy the application form.

Two years later to the day, the senior has his bright light turn to final  darkness. After the burial and coupled with grief, the grandchild finds he does  not receive one dime.

Case shut… but not completely. That precise identical time, a young chronic  drunk rams through the metal barrier aside a hill. Someone with identity  comparable to the former agent’s likeness is at once being engulfed in glowing  flames. After his instant cremation, no life insurance coverage is ever  located.

Final Expense Life Insurance was written by professional insurance business  writer, Donald Yerke. His writings will likely be launched right here, and  published in many locations. Find important material at Agents Insurance  Marketing, [http://www.agentsinsurancemarketing.com] right now. During the time  there steal your complimentary personal copy of “The Science of Getting Rich,”  as long as supplies last.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Donald_Yerke

Government Grants For Senior Citizens – Specific Grants Set Up For the Elderly by Matthew Salvinger

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The government has grants set up to help every group of people in the  country, including senior citizens. In some cases these grants may be approved  to the senior citizens themselves, but the grants can also be awarded to people  who assist the citizens on a regular basis. Whether it’s medical research for  the elderly or increasing the safety of old folks homes there are grants that  will provide funding to those who need it.

Government grants for senior citizens will often go to organizations that  work with the elderly and charities that support senior citizen groups. These  organizations can be businesses or volunteer groups, as long as they work with  the elderly in some capacity. The grants can be used for special classes for  people over 65, providing cheaper medical services for the elderly, keeping  volunteer groups that run errands for disabled older adults funded, and just  about anything else an organization can think of to help the elderly  community.

Various websites have provided lists of where to find these government  grants. They have information on what government organization is funding the  grant, when the deadline for the grant application is, what the grant is  intended for, and how to apply for those specific grants. Anyone can apply for  government grants for senior citizens as long as they qualify for the grant. It  tends to be easier for individuals to go through organizations if they are  seeking grant money although individuals are permitted to apply also. Certain  grants for the elderly such as education grants and housing grants are simple to  get without the assistance of an agency. More information on who can apply for  these grants is available through government websites and some local government  agencies.

The US Government and private foundations award MILLIONS IN GRANTS to people just like you who are in need of  financial help. The best part is, most grants come with absolutely NO INTEREST!  Get More  Details

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_Salvinger

Niche Marketing Strategies For Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Senior Citizens by SK Tilton

April 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

For years, we’ve heard about the graying of our population from the baby boom  years. Our current class of senior citizens inductees (the population born  during the Baby Boom after World War II from 1946 to 1964) is going to make up  close to 20% percent of the total US population by 2029 according to the US  Census Bureau. What often goes unmentioned is that this mature population also  controls one of the largest percentages of disposable income. As a group, senior  citizens are and will be for some time the most affluent Americans. They hold  about three quarters of the nation’s financial assets worth approximately $1  trillion in disposable income annually.

Again, that is $1 trillion dollars in disposable income annually.

Many product and/or service oriented businesses have taken the long view and  begun marketing various products and services geared specifically to the older  consumer. Despite this recognition on the part of a few marketers, this  financially secure, mature group of consumers remains largely untapped by  educational companies and services. Take for instance the onslaught of new  technologies that seem to pop up like daisies in the spring, out of all consumer  groups, our seniors, are usually the last to be courted. While it may be true  that certain technologies are better suited for younger tech savvy consumers (I  am reminded of my elderly grandmother who purchased an unlimited text messaging  package on a small phone without text messaging capability and did I mention she  had arthritis), it doesn’t mean that this market is entirely unsuited for those  educational businesses and services that use technology to deliver their product  or service.

For a supplemental education service tutoring provider, this mature consumer  group is wide open with far less competition and minimal requirements in the way  of overhead expenditures. Two of the much-needed services that senior citizens  in particular lack are computer training and technology acclimation. Many of the  services supplemental education companies can provide, are the ones that are  most often overlooked or taken for granted, i.e. using the internet, opening up  an email account, social networking account registration, etc. If you are  reading this article, you can definitely offer those services and more. Suppose  for a moment you feel uncomfortable with your level of competence in offering a  few of these services, let me repeat what I said in my previous article, Niche  Marketing Strategies for Tutoring Businesses Looking To Attract Parents of  Students Taking State Standardized Tests, you do not have to be an expert in the  subject matter in order to provide supplemental services in the subject matter,  you just need to hire people with thorough experience related to the field.

The reason for the lack of competition in this age group is precisely because  this mature audience is a bit more discerning with their spending habits and a  more sophisticated approach is required to gain their attention, loyalty, and  dollars. However, it is for this very reason that supplemental education service  providers should dive into this market with fervor and enthusiasm. Education is,  and has always been a cornerstone for any age group. The value that the 50 and  over age group places on education should not go unnoticed. Along with  education, communication plays an important role in everyone’s lives and its  role only expands as one gets older. In the past, many grandparents would send  letters to their grandchildren and eagerly await their response. Grandparents  yearn to be a part of their grandchildren’s lives. Why not offer the ability to  stay in touch while simultaneously helping an older population learn and acquire  new skills? Imagine grandma’s joy every time she logs on to her e-mail account  and sees a message from her grandchild or when she receives a tweet. It’s truly  a win-win proposition!

Of course that’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the type of  services supplemental education providers can offer up in addition to computer  training. Curriculum and/or activities marketed to senior citizens can range  from learning a new language to scrap booking to ballroom dancing. If you’re  looking for ideas on what senior citizens are interested in learning, you can  find a compiled starter list below. Since most of your organized activities and  programs will consist of a variety of group sizes, you will have the ability to  market age specific specials and discounted tuition fees accordingly. Remember,  you run a supplemental education service business that should be able to teach  and tutor in multiple disciplines. You do not need to have any expert knowledge  in any of these areas, just hire someone who does. It is highly unlikely that  Sam Walton knew how to repair the diesel engines of every tractor-trailer that  brought in a load of merchandise to his stores, but his business (Walmart) hired  people who did have that expertise.

The best part about marketing to this age group is that they are fairly  accessible if you know where to look. Putting up postings/flyers at local  community church bulletins, visiting the adult education departments of local  community colleges, and contacting the Facility Director or Onsite Coordinator  at various assisted living facilities to propose your computer training or other  services to their residents, is a good way to start. If interested, there are  plenty of online directories that list full contact information for assisted  living facilities narrowed by zip code or state.

How about the Bingo nights? They are usually held at lodges, halls, churches,  and schools/community colleges.

Hold the presses! Yet another great source that has been largely abandoned by  the younger generation is the newspaper. Here’s a little known fact about the  newspaper industry – 65% of its readers are over the age of 55. By advertising  in this medium you are reaching over half of the newspapers readers – Now that’s  worth another read!

When it comes to reaching senior citizens, let your creativity lead the way,  your opportunities are limitless. For the astute, forward thinking individual,  this is a unique opportunity to service an undeserved demographic and separate  your business from the competition. Remember, thinking outside the box never  gets old!

Activity Ideas for Senior Citizens: · Computer Training  · Dance   · Yoga  · Painting  · Sewing · Journal Writing · Knitting or  crocheting  · Photography · Discussion Groups  · Exercise  ·  Knitting  · Foreign Language Conversation · Needlepoint  · Pinochle   · Quilting  · Tai Chi  · Writing workshops  · Crafts  ·  Bowling  · Bridge

S.K. Tilton has served as a program director, site coordinator, area  director, and as a SES business consultant to various SES (Supplemental  Education Services) tutoring companies across the United States. S.K. Tilton has  written numerous business plans for SES start ups and filed many approved  applications on behalf of SES tutoring companies. As a consultant, S.K. Tilton  has been responsible for presenting and implementing successful marketing plans  and helping first year start ups achieve success normally enjoyed by seasoned  SES veterans. S.K. Tilton’s latest work combines practical experience of the  best and worst SES practices to bring you the only SES success guide book  available. For further information on the SES Made Easy book and the author,  please visit http://www.sestutoringbiz.com.

Stay informed on the latest information regarding supplemental education  service tutoring at http://sestutoringbiz.com/category/Blog/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=SK_Tilton

 

Senior Citizen Discounts at Luxury Hotels by Kelvin Kong

April 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As people reach the age of 60, they think that they have already experienced  a lot in life. They had been through the ups, downs and zigzags of everyday  living. There were enough smiles given away and tears cried out. Old people  choose to stay laid back and stop wanting, desiring and wishing for more in  life. But it should not always be the case.

There are things in life that are still good to experience regardless of age  or status. There are still unanswered wanting that remain within us but would  not want to submit to. One of these desires is to feel pampered and be treated  like a queen or a king. At old age, grandparents sometimes feel that their  children and grandchildren are way too busy with their individual businesses  that they tend to devote lesser time for them. To rekindle family ties and spoil  the seniors, a family bonding and relaxation trip in a luxury hotel would be a  great idea.

Spending a night in a luxurious five-star hotel like the Ritz Hotel,  Dorchester Hotel or Marriott Hotel may seem impossible because it requires a lot  of cash out to make it happen. But with great discounts, this dream is not that  far to fulfill.

Luxury hotels, ranging from five to seven-star hotels, in London offer  special discount for senior citizens. The best deals, discounts and promo rates  are always available on the official websites of the hotels. This information is  also readily accessible in the tourism websites of London.

Discounted rates do not equate with less privileges or services. The best  deals are offered to senior citizens without sacrificing quality and efficiency  of service. Some of the special treats included in these deals are: 24-hour room  service, health club facility and free internet services. Luxury hotels also  have their own restaurants, where grandparents can eat a luscious dinner with  the family; cafes, where they can just relax while reading their favorite book  and drinking tea; and bars, just in case they feel like reminiscing their teen  years.

Luxury hotels like Millennium Hotel Mayfair, Renaissance Chancery Court Hotel  and the Radisson Edwardian Hampshire Hotel understand the importance of creating  a family-like environment for the senior citizens. Staff and employees undergo  intensive training in guest relations to enable them to deal with their guests  in a manner that will make them feel that they are not far from their own  homes.

Since luxury hotels are usually located in the city center, senior citizens  can take part in varied activities like the city tour where they can visit and  take pictures of prominent British landmarks like the House of Parliament, the  Tower of London, the Buckingham Palace, the Westminster Abbey, the Big Ben and  the London Eye.

With great discounts and special treatments prepared for senior citizens, who  can say that luxurious relaxation trips are impossible? Nothing is never too  late for old age: if there’s a will, there’s definitely a way.

London Budget  Hotels provides comprehensive information on London travel and detailed  reviews of the hotels and accommodation available in London. Check out the best  offers, and also the excellent reviews of each of the available hotels at this  fantastic site.

If you are looking for affordable Paris Hotels to spend your nights in Paris  (France), do also checkout our fabulous recommendations at Paris Budget Hotels.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kelvin_Kong

 

Senior Citizens Assisted Living Options by Sean Lightfoot

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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A recent study on seniors has shown that independent senior citizens assisted  living is the #1 choice for them versus living with a loved one. Most people  feel that living with others would cause them to be a burden on them. As an  individual grows older, they begin to need the assistance of others more and  more.

Unlike a decade ago, seniors have become a part of the information age by  learning about computers and the latest gadgets. Due to this fact, there has be  a flux of new state-of-the-art senior facilities catering to computer savvy  seniors.

Many of the senior citizens that have just retired from jobs that required  them to work with computers prefer to continue to be around computers as they  have become accustomed. Senior citizens assisted living facilities that make a  point to stay up to date, helps those seniors feel right at home.

In recent years senior facilities have began to offer many different options  and services to their residents. So much so that these facilities are now  categorized into 3 major groups.

Nursing Homes – For those that are incapacitated and/or require supervised or  administered medicines. These facilities have full-time medical staff on hand in  case of emergencies.

Assisted Living – This type of facility caters to those that need assistance  with their daily routines such as cleaning, shopping, laundry and cooking.

Independent Living – Independent living is good for those that can live  totally independent and is still able to cook and clean. Some seniors start out  by moving to one of these facilities and relocate as their needs change later  on. The units are usually fully furnished apartments with full kitchens.

There are many more options available to seniors so it is highly advised that  one turns to a professional advisor to assist in seeking the facility and  services that are needed. There are professionals that offer these services free  of charge. They give you a list of facilities that can cater to your needs and  help with visiting and checking out each of them. They usually make money from  your insurance company of the facility that is chosen.

If you need help with researching Senior Citizen Assisted Living  [http://www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com/], visit www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com  [http://www.elderlyhelpandhomes.com/]. Learn about a FREE program that assists  in finding the services that you or your loved one may needs.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sean_Lightfoot

 

Senior Citizens – Burdened With Grief and Anger by Jessie Penn

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Grief and anger often becomes a heavy burden for people as they age. Throughout life, people experience grief over many things. They grieve if there home burns down, lose a job or a pet. However, an area of loss that is not usually considered with grief is the physical decline during the aging process.

Grief can be detected, in seniors, by the comments they make about losing their youth. Many times, they speak with remorse at lost youth, decreased functionality, and body strength. When a senior citizen notices they are losing muscle strength, or begin experiencing arthritis, stiffness, and joint pain, it’s not unusual to notice anger. They become upset and wish to escape the betrayals of their bodies, and become very angry in the process.

No one asks to get old or feeble. Most likely, if we had a choice, most of us would vote to discontinue and ban getting old. A person might grieve when they are bestowed the title of “Senior Citizen.” At first, a senior citizen, might not notice the changes that are taking place in the physical aspects of the body or the mind. And, perhaps, as much as they hate the thought of getting old, family members also grieve about losing the ‘young’ mom or dad they once knew.

Unfortunately, getting angry about growing old has no escape; there’s no one to blame it on. So, sometimes the result is that seniors lash out at the ones closest to them. Anger and frustration with the aging body can cause tempers to rage or flare up unexpectedly. Many times, a senior lashes out at a loved one or caregiver because they are nearby and easily accessible. The aging person knows it isn’t fair, but may have a hard time explaining their actions.

Learning how to cope with anger about aging is necessary so you don’t hurt the innocent ones around you. But, it is also unhealthy to keep your grief bottled up inside you. If seniors are not allowed to vent and get rid of their anger, the body can decline at a faster rate.

It’s been suggested that people become angry because they feel a false sense of entitlement. This crops up when expectations do not line up with reality. A feeling of undo entitlement happens when we believe we do not deserve to get old.

There is just one way to confront getting older, and that is to recognize that we are not alone, everyone will get old, and we are not entitled to be exempt from the aging process. Recognizing this fact can help to eliminate anger from the arena as we cope with the affects of aging.

Attempting to deny the advance of life’s end, is probably the sole cause of midlife crisis’s. Trying to behave as if they are not getting older and hiding emotional responses to aging can cause devastating results. Avoiding the feelings about aging has caused many to act irresponsibility or make bad decisions.

By recognizing the problems that naturally happen through aging, some of the anger can be avoided. Instead of dwelling on declining abilities, senior citizens can minimize the impacts by living with a healthier attitude toward aging.

Focusing on your diet, exercise, keeping busy, and doing everything you can to stay rested and emotionally sound. Thinking about or getting involved with other people can help to create a healthier attitude toward aging and minimize its effects.

Try to keep your spirits up, be happy through achievements and seemingly small enjoyments. Keep a young at heart attitude and get in touch with the child inside you. You’ve come too far, traveled many winding paths, and you deserve to feel content and happy. Emotions about how you feel about yourself can play a major role in the person you choose to be as a senior citizen.

Get free information to protect your loved ones when a medical emergency or security treat happens. Go to http://personalsecuritydevices.walkinsarewelcome.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jessie_Penn

Senior Citizens Can Become Great Customers by Michael McCann

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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If you think the senior citizen market isn’t dynamic, then you’re really out  of touch with marketing. Thirty-five percent of our population is over 55 years  old, and these very affluent seniors control almost 45 percent of the disposable  income of our country.

Neither Madison Avenue nor the advertising agency down the block takes this  group seriously, and as a result, the market is virtually untapped. Here are  four suggestions on how to target your business efforts to penetrate this  market.

o Gain an understanding of this large market… Throw out  everything you ever heard about the over-55 group. These people are vibrant and  full of life. They are looking for new ideas, challenges, and new and innovative  ways to enjoy life. Thanks to Social Security, wise investing and good  retirement plans, they have the money to pay for what they want. Most senior  citizens want what you want: health, happiness and security. Many want  excitement, romance and adventure. They want to maintain close ties with their  children and grandchildren.

o Target products and services… Yes, senior citizens want to  know about cruise ships, vitamins and wheelchairs, but so do thousands of people  under 55.

The difference is that seniors are looking for solutions to problems. They  want to make their life easier and more enjoyable, and they have the money to  pay for the services and products that can help them achieve these goals. If  your product solves a specific problem, you will find this market is for  you.

o How to advertise to seniors… Forget the flowery phrases, cute  word plays and fast-action ads. Senior citizens want to know the facts and what  benefits those facts will provide for them.  Your products and services are just  the carrier of benefits, not benefits in themselves.

Seniors want to know how your offering will make life easier or better or  more fun. Problem solving is high on the list of benefits wanted, and proof of  claim is requirement. Straight talk is appreciated, and as usual, a picture is  worth a thousand words.

Two-step advertising works well in the senior market. Seniors have time, so  snap decisions are seldom made. Advertisements that offer more information work  especially well. Always be positive in your advertising, and never talk down to  your audience. Most seniors are a lot smarter than you or I.

o Things to avoid… It is not a good idea to sell marginal ideas  to senior citizens such as work-at-home projects and get-rich-quick business  schemes. The senior lobby had watchdog groups looking for scam artists, and  these two topics top the list of no-nos. Get on their list and you will find  your business in trouble.

If you’re looking for the best source of information as to how to advertise  to the senior market, read what they read. Buy some of the newsstand magazines  on retirement, vacations, travel, cooking or investing targeted toward seniors,  and read both the articles and the ads. Find copies of Modern Maturity.  This and other magazines and periodicals will provide valuable insight into how  to advertise to this lucrative market.

Make more money faster by easily connecting with hard-to-reach decision  makers who can buy your products and services…NOW! Get started free by getting  Michael McCann’s new Special Report excerpted from his newest edition of his  popular business development book, Connecting with Key Decision Makers (How to  Reach Hard-to-Reach Businesspeople Who Can Say “Yes”)…just for asking at http:/www.GlobalBusinessCafe.com/  http://Twitter.com/MikeHMcCann Go now!

Michael McCann is a 25-year veteran of developing unique and professional  business development programs that create tangible results for individuals and  companies. Let him help you instantly…free!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_McCann

 

Meeting and Socializing Locations For Senior Citizens by Padmanabha Vyasamoorthy

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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As a person working for the welfare of senior citizens I am always interested  in meeting several of them in one place. Therefore I used to go to places where  they are normally seen in good numbers. I took the help of a web group called  sss-global and found out places where I can further explore looking for old  people. Here is a gist of my findings. They are given no specific order, because  categorization freezes free thinking!

o Senior Citizen Associations when they conduct regular meetings o Day  Care Centers attached to such SCAs o In the west, McDonald outfits offer  discounts to seniors in the morning hours and for early elderly lunchers:  therefore, McDonald outfits. o Alzheimer’s Day Care Centers o Retirement  Community Activity Rooms o Banks on first few days of the month to collect  pension o Parks in the evenings to while away time o Temples to bribe  Gods and to gossip and perhaps worship too! o Typical clubs and pubs to meet  friends; play cards; relax with a drink o Lectures planned for senior  citizens o Libraries to borrow / return or read books o Hospital out  patient geriatric wards for obvious reasons o Old Age Homes and retirement  facilities (senior homes) o Post Offices to deposit or collect pension or  interest income o On boulevards, parks, gardens, walking or jogging paths –  walkers o Locations where laughter club sessions are held o Near schools  waiting to collect grand children o Any bus or train bogie carrying  travelers on pilgrimage o Railway booking counters meant especially for  senior citizens o Any marriage function – not necessarily reception – is  full of oldies o Any Bhajan sessions, religious discourses

The listing will be useful to product or service providers for this age  group. Banks offering special FD schemes, Health Insurance companies, suppliers  of assistance devices etc to mention a few. If you can extend my listing I shall  be happy. If you reflect deeply upon the question: “What do senior citizens do?”  and try to answer “where” they do it in good numbers, I am getting  you!

Dr P Vyasamoorthy Retired Librarian turned Information Consultant. Specialist  in providing Information to Senior Citizens who are Indians or Indians living  abroad. Moderates a Web group for Senior Citizens in India for the past 8 years.  Web group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sss-global

He blogs at: http://vyasa-kaaranam-ketkadey.blogspot.com/ The posts in his blog are mostly his own writings dealing with retired peoples’  problems.

He has taken to writing recently for the past six months and writes in  Merinews, cplash, karmayog, Triond and other sites.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Padmanabha_Vyasamoorthy

 

Senior Citizens Health Conditions by Ian Pennington

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As we reach our later years we are at risk of a great many health concerns.  The list of senior citizens health conditions is a long and complex one. It  includes both mental and physical issues and some people will be plagued with both.

It can only be expected that, as time takes it toll on our bodies, we will  experience some deterioration in our physical and mental wellbeing. That is not  to say that once we have retired we are on the scrap heap and just waiting until  our lives are over. Far from it. There has been a huge amount of medical  research taking place over the last century, and indeed much longer, and this  has paved the way for a greater understanding of the aging process. We are now  much more educated regarding nutrition and health matters and are able to  control and sometimes eliminate many of the senior citizens health  conditions.

One of the main fears that the elderly face is that of dementia of one form  or another. The most commonly known is Alzheimer’s Disease but there are others.  This affects the patients mind and can be the cause of heartache for a caring  partner who will feel unable to help. They will find that they spend much of  their time caring for the patient whilst at the same time having to accept the  fact that they are becoming more distant as the disease progresses. This can be  aggravated if the carer is also suffering from any one of the other senior  citizens health conditions, either physically or mentally.

Other serious conditions can often include strokes. Post stroke problems can  vary hugely depending on the severity of the attack and the level of recovery of  the patient. Sometimes a stroke can result in partial paralysis. This obviously  has a far reaching affect on the elderly and may jeopardise their ability to get  out and visit family and friends. Even the most simple tasks, which were taken  for granted previously, may now cause a problem; shopping, housework etc.  Strokes are high on the list of senior citizens health conditions, but, they are  also the subject of a lot of research and our understanding of the subject is  increasing all the time. Post stroke care has improved a great deal and in some  cases patients now recover fully.

Heart disease has been an increasing problem in all age groups, but continues  to be a main factor in contributing to senior citizens health conditions. Once  again, however, research is good on the subject and our knowledge increasing all  the time. Surgical options are becoming more common and our expertise in the  field has contributed to many lives being extended.

There are a number of senior citizens health conditions which can be helped  by a careful diet being followed during our earlier years. Osteoporosis,  rheumatism and arthritis have all been the subject of studies and tests. Some  foods have been found to be a great help in reducing the chances of becoming a  sufferer.

Don’t wait until it is too late. There has been so much research undertaken  on the subject of senior citizens health conditions that you would be wise to  take action early and follow the advice that is available so that you can  increase your chances of enjoying your later years in the best possible  health.

Ian Pennington is an accomplished niche website developer and author.

To learn more about senior health  [http://seniorhealthblog.info/senior-citizens-health-conditions], please visit  Senior Health Blog [http://seniorhealthblog.info] for current articles and  discussions.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ian_Pennington

 

Email Marketing For Senior Citizen Centers by Dan Forootan

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Ads in the phone book and Yellow Pages are a better investment than a  newspaper ad, but senior citizen centers need to provide gentle reminders of  their presence to potential patrons, many of whom are living alone and uncertain  about venturing into something new and unknown. How can they encourage newcomers  to come to the center while reminding regular visitors of all the center has to  offer? The answer is email marketing!

A senior citizens’ center email marketing campaign will achieve a pair of  essential objectives for the center by cutting costs and delivering the message  straight to the target audience. The idea that senior citizens would be relying  on email for news would have sounded ludicrous 15 or even 10 years ago. But with  more senior citizens jumping aboard the information superhighway than ever  before, an email marketing plan is the best way to reach seniors!

Email marketing allows these establishments to provide the type of  interactive advertisement newspapers and even television commercials cannot  offer. In addition to listing the essentials such as address, contact  information and operating hours, an email can include a schedule of upcoming  events, photos of people at the center and even videos of some of the fun  activities that take place at the center. What better way is there to convince  people to come to a senior center than by showing them what they are  missing?

Even those senior citizens who do not use email can be reached via email  marketing efforts. Often times, it is the children and/or grandchildren who  investigate senior centers on behalf of their elders. The “next generation” can  sign up to receive emails from a senior citizen center and then let their  parents or grandparents know the types of events that are taking place there,  from lunches and dinners to movies, card game tournaments and performances by  local music or theatre groups.

In addition, senior citizens who use email but who aren’t the ones checking  out senior citizen centers online can still receive these forwarded messages  from their children, grandchildren or friends. The email marketing software  required for these campaigns makes it very easy to forward messages to other  interested people, which can only help generate further business for the  centers. Just as importantly, this software is inexpensive to purchase and easy  to install and manage. There is no need to add staff to implement and/or handle  these email marketing projects. Add it all up and aemail marketing campaign is a  win-win for those who operate the center as well as those who visit  it!

Dan Forootan is the President of EZ Publishing, Inc., the creator of the  StreamSend Email  Marketing service.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dan_Forootan

 

Useful Tips For Senior Citizen Trips by James Redder

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The best way to keep senior citizens engaged is by making them take part in  senior citizen trips. There are many organizations and clubs that organize such  trips regularly. Letting the elderly people travel and relax for a while is one  of the best gifts for them. The best thing about the trips is that they can meet  many similar people and share a lot of things between them. They can make new  friends and see many new places.

How to find such clubs? The best place to start the search is the internet.  Look for travel organizations that conduct regular trips for seniors. Gather  information about many such clubs and choose the best according to one’s  requirements. If possible they should enroll in the organizations and enjoy  various other benefits too. The trips may be of various types. They can either  be a one-day type or for many days. The people who are participating in the  travel should inquire about a lot of things to make their travel  comfortable.

If the tour has been planned to a far off place and is more than two or three  days then a lot of preparations have to be done before going for the tour. It is  better read and understand about the location planned for the trip. Try to know  about the climate also because the appropriate clothing will need to be packed.  Though the members will keep the members informed it is better to have some idea  beforehand.

Most of the senior citizens have to take different medications for various  ailments. While packing for senior citizen trips ensure that all needed  medications are also packed accordingly. Try to carry a first aid kit with all  the necessary medications for common ailments like cold, aches, diarrhea etc.  These can be useful in case of minor problems and at times when a doctor is not  available. Make a checklist of things to be carried and take all the necessary  things. Keep them in places where they are easily accessible.

The greatest advantage of participating in senior citizen trips is that a lot  of new places can be seen along with many people. Instead of traveling alone and  getting into problems it is better to go with senior citizen travel groups. Try  to find the best travel clubs and become a member. The tour will be planned  carefully in such a way that they are very comfortable and useful for older  people.

Next, now you are better informed on the benefits of senior citizen trips. Will you start planning one of your own?  Read more information concerning senior citizen travel groups on this website.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=James_Redder

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6324728

Health Insurance For Senior Citizens by Ram Mohan Susarla

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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If you are a senior citizen and do not have health insurance, the thought of  having to go to an emergency room in case of illness may be troubling you. You  should have planned for your retirement but if you did not include the details  of having Health Insurance after you retire, you are at the mercy of the ER and  without coverage you may even have to forego treatment. For many people in the  US, health care costs often result in bankruptcy even when they have insurance  because not all illnesses are covered by the policy. When it can happen to the  people who have insurance, it can be a nightmare for those who do not have  it.

In recent months, the issue of health insurance for senior citizens has  received extraordinary coverage and attention in the US because of President  Obama’s plan to have universal health care available to all citizens. This  measure from the Obama administration has drawn critics and supporters alike and  the battle lines are drawn in an increasingly bitter battle. The issue at stake  is whether there should be a public option that would enable the senior citizens  access to health care provided for by the government. The public option does not  guarantee free coverage but includes an option for the employers and the  government to provide for an eventuality.

Senior citizens need healthcare and they need it more than the other age  groups as they need access to quality medical assistance because of their  advancing age that makes them vulnerable to disease and disability. It is for  this reason that medical care in many countries is free for senior citizens and  they have access to the best medical facilities. Likewise, the US should also  have a health care system that provides for its senior citizens and ensures that  they get proper treatment for their various ailments.

In the context of the baby boomers retiring in large numbers and without the  proper tools for some of them to plan adequately for their retirement and health  care, there should be a comprehensive plan for access to medical coverage by the  insurance companies as well as the government. There are several insurance  companies that have special plans for senior citizens as they allow for the  coverage with all facilities provided for them. However, there are other  companies that do not encourage coverage for senior citizens on the grounds that  they are a high risk category and hence the premiums do not justify coverage.  There are some commentators who call for an old age premium to be placed on the  coverage plan so that senior citizens can get coverage at the rates provided by  the insurers, albeit with a premium.

The point that is being made here is that senior citizens better plan for  their retirement when they are in their forties and fifties so that they do not  become a burden on their children and that they retain coverage beyond  retirement and after they are well into their sixties.

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Camping is S’more Fun Great American Backyard Campout Sponsored by National Wildlife Federation June 22, 2013

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

RESTON, Va. (April 11, 2013) – On June 22, 2013, thousands of families across the nation will gather in their backyards, neighborhoods, communities, and parks and enjoy a night under the stars while helping fundraise for a leading conservation organization.  As part of the National Wildlife Federation’s “Be Out There” movement, the Great American Backyard Campout encourages people to get outside and connect with the natural world.  It is especially important for kids because, for the first time in our country’s history, we have an entire generation that is growing up disconnected from nature.  Spending time outdoors, like Campout, makes kids happier and healthier.

The National Wildlife Federation provides everything you need to head out into the great outdoors. The Campout website has packing lists, recipes, nocturnal wildlife guides, exploration activities, nature games, fundraising prizes, directory of Campouts by state to search for large groups to join, and more.  For more information, and to register, please go to: www.backyardcampout.org.

For more National Wildlife Federation news, visit: www.nwf.org/news.

National Wildlife Federation is America’s largest conservation organization, inspiring Americans to protect wildlife for our children’s future.

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor by Nina Kramer

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor by Nina Kramer

“‘You have cancer’ are three of the scariest words you will ever hear,”
says Nina Kramer, author of the new book, The Harrowing Medical Journey of
a Cancer Survivor. “But how you react after hearing those words can mean
the difference between thriving and deteriorating.”

Kramer’s journey through the world of cancer treatment began in 2000 when
she was diagnosed with bladder cancer. Every year over 73,000 people are
diagnosed with the disease in the United States. Men are three times more
likely than women to develop it and about 5% will die from the disease, but
the death rate has been declining over the past twenty years.

Like many, Kramer’s journey began with a routine physical. What followed was
anything but routine.  Her first detour began with a trusted doctor. She liked him and
followed his instructions faithfully but, as she was to learn, he was not giving her the best and most advanced treatments. The number one rule when facing an illness as serious as cancer, she quickly discovered, is to do your research and seek out the best doctors and institutions that treat your disease.

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor is Kramer’s courageous
story as she copes with a severe illness that lasted more than a decade. It began with a diagnosis of low-grade bladder cancer, continued with the removal and/or reconstruction of vital organs, and ended with dialysis and a kidney transplant. Although the story is specific to bladder cancer and its aftermath, it covers aspects inherent in any serious,
and sometimes life-threatening, illness.

With candor, honesty and life-affirming messages, The Harrowing Medical
Journey of a Cancer Survivor shares:

* The impact of emotions on surviving a serious illness – fear, denial, anger, anxiety and depression can have devastating results
* The search for experts – the single most important thing you can do when
battling a severe illness is to find the best hospitals and doctors specializing in your disease
* The focus on other passions – engrossing yourself in activities other than the illness to relieve your mind from the constant anxiety of worrying about it
* The importance of cancer support groups and psychotherapy – talking to other people can help you explore your feelings so they don’t interfere with or hamper your recovery
* Spending time on what you love – do everything you can to fight your illness, but spend time doing the things that bring you pleasure and satisfaction
* Having sex – the human contact and intimacy, as well as the erotic pleasure, can be a wonderful antidote to pain and misery

“I wanted to share my story with other cancer victims,” adds Kramer. “As I travelled this frightening medical journey, I learned a lot about how to survive and even thrive under sometimes terrifying circumstances. I wanted to share this experience in the hope that it would help others undergoing frightening medical journeys.

Nina Kramer, is a published novelist and author of the new nonfiction ebook,
The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor. She has held various
positions from journals manager to assistant vice president with medical,
scientific and technical publishers while pursuing her craft as a writer.
While undergoing cancer treatment, she made an arduous trip through some
remote locations in China—described in her Medical Journey book—as
research for her next novel set in the Middle Kingdom, Phoenix Rising; Tigers Flying. She divides her time between New York City and Stockbridge, MA.

Blog: http://ninaikramer.wordpress.com/cancer

The Harrowing Medical Journey of a Cancer Survivor is available in ebook format
through www.authorhouse.com. www.amazon.com, www.barnesandnoble.com,
and all online booksellers.

Review Copies Available Upon Request

Successful Summerlin Half Marathon kicks off Third Annual event this Saturday

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SUCCESFUL SUMMERLIN HALF MARATHON KICKS OFF THIRD ANNUAL EVENT THIS SATURDAY

600 runners and walkers are expected to make the 13.1 mile trek through Summerlin

WHAT:            The Summerlin Half Marathon is a 13.1-mile course that meanders through seven Summerlin villages on the community’s nationally recognized trail system. Participants will pass through the community’s most scenic parks and natural arroyos.  The event is a chip-timed run/walk.  Top male and female finishers in varying age groups are recognized; all participants receive medals and shirts.   A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Lili Claire Foundation, dedicated to easing the challenges faced by families of children with neurological disorders.

 

WHEN:            Saturday, April 13 @ 7 a.m.

 

WHERE:           J.W. Marriott Las Vegas Resort & Spa, 221 N. Rampart Boulevard

                        Las Vegas, NV

REGISTER:       To register visit http://www.desertskyadventures.com/summerlin2013. Registration is $85 per person.  Online registration ends at 11:59 p.m. Thursday, April 11.

 

About Summerlin:

Developed by The Howard Hughes Corporation, Summerlin began to take shape in 1990 and has ranked in the country’s top 10 best-selling master-planned communities for nearly two decades.  Located along the western rim of the Las Vegas valley, Summerlin encompasses 22,500 acres with approximately 6,600 acres still remaining to accommodate future growth within the master plan. The community is currently home to more than 100,000 residents who enjoy an unparalleled list of amenities.  These include more than 150 neighborhood and village parks, more than 150 completed miles of trails, 26 public and private schools, 14 houses of worship, nine golf courses, shopping centers, medical and cultural facilities, business parks and more than three dozen actively selling floor plans. Homes are available in a variety of styles – from single-family homes to townhomes, condominiums and lofts – priced from the $200,000s to more than $1 million. Custom home sites in The Ridges are priced from the high $200,000s.  Luxury apartment homes offer monthly rents starting from the $800s. Visit www.summerlin.com for more information. 

City Of Las Vegas May 2013 Senior Special Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.  Centers are closed May 27 for the Memorial Day holiday.

 

New Walk with Ease Program (ages 50+)

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30 p.m.

Cost: $5 drop in, or free with fitness pass purchase.

Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Join this new walking group that is part of the Arthritis Foundation program.


Lieburn Matinee Movies
(ages 50+)

Wednesdays, 1:30 p.m.

Free admission.

Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Popcorn and water will be provided. Call 229-1600 to learn which movies will be shown.

 

East Las Vegas Matinee Movies (ages 50+)

Fridays, 1 p.m.

Free admission.

East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Free popcorn for movie goers. Call 229-1515 to learn which movies will be shown.

 

Bunco (ages 50+)
Wednesday, May 1, 10 a.m. Registration opens April 22.
Cost: $5 with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Enjoy playing Bunco and having a light snack afterward. Advanced registration required.
Call 229-1702 to register and for more information.

 

Centennial Hills Active Adult Book Club (ages 50+)
First Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m.; May 1.

Cost: Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Come prepared to discuss this month’s book: “Defending Jacob” by William Landay.

 

May Day Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, May 2, 10 a.m. Advance registration is required by April 26.
Cost: $3.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Celebrate spring and the coming of summer!  Call 229-1515 to register.

 

Cinco de Mayo Luncheon (ages 50+)

Thursday, May 2, 11:30 a.m.  Advance registration required by April 29.

Cost: $5; $2 annual Senior Programs membership also required.

Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Enjoy a fabulous Mexican meal! Call 229-6454 for additional information and registration.

 

Cinco de Mayo Luncheon (ages 50+)

Tuesday, May 7, at 11 a.m. Advance registration is required.

Cost: $ 5 per person.

Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy enchiladas, chips, salsa, Spanish rice and refried beans. Please call 229-6125 to register by May 3. Space is limited.

 

Mother’s Day Potluck Celebration and Glamour Shots (ages 50+)

Thursday, May 9, noon.

Cost: Bring a dish large enough to share. Includes one free glamour shot; extra shots may be purchased.

Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy the afternoon with a variety of foods and activities. Make appointments early for your free pose. Please register by May 6 by calling 229-6125. Space is limited.

 

Scrapbooking and Card Making (ages 50+)
Monday, May 13, 1 p.m.
Free with current annual $2 senior programs membership.

Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Share crafting ideas with others. Registration opens April 22. Bring your family, pet or vacation pictures and make a scrapbook page! Call 229-1702 for information and registration.

National Salad Month Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, May 15, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration is required by May 10.
Cost: $5.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Celebrate National Salad Month with surprising combinations and new tastes! No rabbit food –you are sure to get your fill! Call 229-1515 to register.

AARP Safe Driving Class (ages 50+)
Thursday, May 16, 11 a.m. Advance registration required; space is limited.
Cost: $12 AARP member, $14 non-member; plus $2 annual Senior Programs membership.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Bring snacks/lunch and drinks. Expect to be in the class until approximately 3 p.m.

Registration For Senior Idol Talent Showcase Auditions Under Way

April 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Las Vegas, Press-Media Releases 

Registration For Senior Idol Talent Showcase Auditions Under Way

Auditions To Be Held May 8-9 

Registration for the 2013 Senior Idol Talent Showcase auditions is under way for the 10th annual competition that will be held Thursday, June 13, at 3 p.m., at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St.

This showcase is for talented, performers age 50 years and older, and includes a variety of categories for individuals and groups to compete in. Categories include, but not limited to, singing, dance, musical instruments and comedy. Each year the array of talent has been some of the best Las Vegas has to offer, and this year will be no different.

To get a registration packet, contact the Las Vegas Senior Center at 229-6454, or stop by at 451 E. Bonanza Road. Packets must be completed and returned to the Las Vegas Senior Center by 6 p.m., Friday, April 26. Invitations to audition will be mailed out, and auditions will be held May 8 and 9at the Las Vegas Senior Center.

City Of Las Vegas April 2013 Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle!

 

Spring Celebration and Foster Connect (all ages)
Saturday, April 6, noon to 4 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Families will enjoy a spring celebration with amusement rides, jump houses, crafts, games, farmers’ market, community vendors, music and much more. Interested families will be able to receive information on becoming a foster family.

 

Summer Themed Specialty Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Thursday, April 11, 8 a.m. registration packets are available for pick up.

Thursday, April 11, 5 p.m., registration opens for Summer 2012 alumni at Mirabelli.

Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m., open registration at both sites in person. No online registration.

Cost: $115 per week for the first child; $110 each additional child from the same family.

MirabelliCommunity Center, 6200 Hargrove Ave., (702) 229-6359.

VeteransMemorialLeisureServicesCenter, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.

Two community centers will offer themed specialty camps with additional activities, cooking, and/or field trips from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, beginning June 10. A few specialty camps have higher prices. Mirabelli special camp list is available online.

For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175.

 

Summer Camp Registration (ages 6-15)

Registration opens Saturday, April 13, 8 a.m. in person at the following sites.

Cost: $75 per week for the first child; $70 for each additional child from the same family.

Lorenzi Adaptive Summer Camp, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-6358.

CimarronRoseCommunity Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607; ages 6-11 only.

DoolittleCommunity Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

StupakCommunity Center, 251 W. Boston Ave., (702) 229-2488.

Camps will be offered from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays, beginning June 10; Lorenzi Adaptive camp will begin at 7:30 a.m. For more information on summer camps, call 229-6175. No online registration.

 

Ward 6 Free Shredding Event
Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle.

Dula Gymnasium Indoor Pickleball Tournament (ages 18+)

Friday, April 19, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Cost: $15 if registered by April 5; $20 if registered after April 5.

Dula Gym, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.

Enter the Inaugural Promotional Pickleball Tournament. Four indoor courts will host Men’s Doubles, Women’s Doubles, Mixed Doubles and 50+ groups with A and B divisions. This is a double-elimination tournament. Minimum registration of four teams per division with a guarantee of three matches. First-place winners will receive awards. Please call 229-6307 for more information and registration flyer.

 

Ward 6 Free Movie in the Park – “Odd Life of Timothy Green”
Friday, April 19, 6:30 p.m.

Free admission.
Centennial Hills Park Amphitheatre, 7101 N. Buffalo Drive, Buffalo and Deer Springs.
Enjoy the PG-rated family film, the “Odd Life of Timothy Green” in the park. Bring a blanket or folding chair to be more comfortable. For more information, call (702) 229-5463.

 

Ward 1/Ward 2 Free Shredding Event

Saturday, April 20, 10 a.m. to noon.

All AmericanSportsPark, 1551 S. Buffalo Drive

Bring your documents that need to be shredded. For more information, call (702) 229-4645.

 

Mayor’s Health Walk (all ages)

Saturday, April 27, 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Free admission and open to the public

Kellogg Zaher Sports Complex, 7901 W. Washington Ave. at Buffalo Drive.
For more information, call (702) 229-6720.

Adaptive Recreation

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m.  Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.

Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

 

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

 

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)

Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.

Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.

CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Call 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence

City Of Las Vegas April 2013 Senior Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

 

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, through April 12, by appointment only.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Low-income residents can get free assistance in preparing their personal income tax forms.  Some restrictions apply; call 229-6454 for details and appointment.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, through April 11 by appointment only.
Free with appointment only.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesday afternoons, through April 9.
Free with appointment only.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1600 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesdays, through April 9, by appointment only.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern, (702) 229-1515

Income restrictions apply.  Call 229-1515 for information and to make an appointment.

 

VITA Free Tax Form Preparation

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., through April 11, by appointment only.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program is an Internal Revenue Service program designed to help low- and moderate-income taxpayers complete their annual tax returns at no cost. All ages with income under $49,000 are welcome. Call 229-6125 for appointments.

Senior Idol Auditions (ages 50+)

Application packets available April 1-26.

Auditions May 8-9, by appointment only.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Residents interested in performing during the annual Senior Idol Talent Show are invited to complete an audition application packet. Singers, dancers, comedians, magicians, and musicians, both individuals and groups, are encouraged to apply. All performers must be at least 50 years old. Application packets will be available April 1 at the Las VegasSeniorCenter, and are due no later than April 26. Auditions will be selected from completed applications; applicants will be given an appointment May 8 or 9 at the Las VegasSeniorCenter. The show will be performed Thursday, June 13. Tickets go on sale May 1. Call 229-6454 for information and application packets!

 

Centennial Hills Active Adult Book Club (ages 50+)
First Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m.; April 3.

Cost: Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Come prepared to discuss this month’s book.

April’s book: “The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein.

May’s book: “Defending Jacob” by William Landay.

Hop into Spring Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, April 4, 10 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 29.
Cost: $3.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Start this spring off right with a sp-egg-tacular breakfast! Hop on over April 4! Registration opens March 1.

 

Scrapbooking and Card Making (ages 50+)

Monday, April 8, 1 to 4 p.m.  (second Monday of each month)
Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Bring a project you’re currently working on and share/receive crafting ideas. Registration opens March 18. Call 229-1702 for more information.

 

Root Beer Float Day (ages 50+)

Tuesday, April 9, 10 a.m. Register by April 2. Space is limited.

Cost: $1.

DoolittleSeniorCenter, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Have a tasty root beer float while enjoying good conversation.

 

International Guitar Month Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, April 17, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration is required by April 12.
Cost: $5.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy lovely guitar music while you dine during the International Guitar Month Luncheon.  Registration opens March 1.

Picnic at the Garden (ages 50+)

Wednesday, April 17, noon. Register at DoolittleSeniorCenter by April 10. Space is limited.

Cost: $3.

DoolittleCommunityGarden, 1200 block of Blankenship Ave., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy grilled burgers and hot dogs, feast on delightful side dishes and desserts, enjoy the scenery and catch up on all the fruits and vegetables grown in our community garden.

 

AARP Defensive Driving (ages 50+)

Thursday, April 18, 11 a.m.

Cost: $12 AARP member/$14 non-members AARP; plus $2 senior programs membership.

LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Bring snacks and drinks to enjoy while you take this defensive driving course to improve your skills!

 

Red Hat Rally (ages 50+)

Thursday, April 25, 11:30 a.m. Register by April 19. Registration opens March 1.

Cost: $10, plus current senior programs membership.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Calling all Red Hatters!  Join the city of Las Vegas and the Purple Passions Red Hat group from the Las VegasSeniorCenter for a luncheon and entertainment to celebrate you.  Door prizes will be awarded. Space is limited, so register early!

 

Seniors Helping Seniors (ages 50+)

Monday, April 29, 1:30 p.m. Register by April 25.

Free admission.

LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Learn about energy-saving programs coordinated by Southwest Gas.

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Senior Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Senior Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

 

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, through April 12, by appointment only.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Low-income residents can get free assistance in preparing their personal income tax forms.  Some restrictions apply; call 229-6454 for details and appointment.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, through April 11 by appointment only.
Free with appointment only.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesday afternoons, through April 9.
Free with appointment only.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1600 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesdays, through April 9, by appointment only.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern, (702) 229-1515

Income restrictions apply.  Call 229-1515 for information and to make an appointment.

 

VITA Free Tax Form Preparation

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., through April 11, by appointment only.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program is an Internal Revenue Service program designed to help low- and moderate-income taxpayers complete their annual tax returns at no cost. All ages with income under $49,000 are welcome. Call 229-6125 for appointments.

Bunco (ages 50+)
Wednesday, March 6, 10 a.m. Advance registration required.
Cost: $5 with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Enjoy playing Bunco and having a light snack afterwards.

Centennial Hills Active Adult Book Club (ages 50+)
First Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m.; March 6.

Cost: Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Come prepared to discuss this month’s book.

March book: “The Given Day” by Dennis Lehane.

April’s book: “The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein.

May’s book: “Defending Jacob” by William Landay.

8th Annual Vision Forum (all ages)

Thursday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Free admission. Those who pre-register by Feb. 27 are guaranteed a free lunch, raffle ticket and expedited Paratransit service, if requested.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Registration and vendors exhibit hall in the adjacent Dula Gym will be open 8-10 a.m. Workshops scheduled 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. include fitness, nutrition, technology tips, goal setting, ADA guidelines, blindness training, transportation, education, health advocacy, low-vision information and a family session. The day is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas, Blindconnect, Nevada Council of the Blind and the Veterans Administration Vision Program. For more information and a registration form, call 229-6454.

 

Springtime Tea Party (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 7, 10 a.m. Register by March 1. Space is limited.

Cost: $2.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Wear your fancy spring hat and bring your favorite teacup to enjoy a variety of teas, fruit, cookies, cakes, music and a raffle.

 

Waffle Day Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, March 7, 10 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 1.
Cost: $3.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy waffles, waffles, and more waffles at this brunch.  Come hungry!

Final Arrangements and Wills Lecture (ages 50+)

Monday, March 11, 1:30 p.m.  Must register by March 8.
Free admission.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Palm Mortuary representative will lecture on final arrangements and wills.

St. Patrick’s Luncheon, Under the Rainbow (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 14, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration required by March 8. Space is limited.

Cost:  $5; must have senior programs membership.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Enjoy a meal of corned beef and cabbage, a traditional St. Patrick’s Day lunch, and entertainment by the Sun City Aliante Songsters.

 

Luck of the Irish Luncheon (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 14, noon. Register by March 8.

Cost: $5.

DoolittleSeniorCenter, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy corned beef, cabbage, potatoes, cornbread, dessert, green punch and great company!

 

St. Patty’s Luncheon (ages 50+)

Friday, March 15, 11:30 a.m. Must register by March 12.

Cost: $5.

LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Enjoy corned beef and cabbage with all the fixings.

 

St. Patrick’s Day Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, March 20, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 15.
Cost: $5.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy a traditional St. Patrick’s Day meal.  Wear green, so you don’t get pinched!

Waffle Day Breakfast (ages 50+)

Monday, March 25, 8:30 to 10 a.m. Advance registration required.

Cost: $4

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

It’s National Waffle Day!  Enjoy waffles, eggs and bacon for breakfast.

SLCC Joins National Program to Train Baby Boomers for Jobs

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Salt Lake Community College was recently chosen to join the Plus 50 Encore Completion Program, a national effort to train 10,000 baby boomers for new jobs in healthcare, education and social services. The program is sponsored by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC).

The College will assist adults age 50 and over in completing degrees or certificates in high-demand occupations that give back to the community. With many adults age 50 and over out of work or seeking to transition to a new career, the program offers skill updates and career makeovers. Salt Lake Community College will prepare older adults for careers such as pharmacy or ultrasound technicians and medical terminology specialists. In addition, the College’s Transition to Teaching program is offered in partnership with the State Office of Education to prepare students as elementary and secondary educators.

“The Plus 50 Encore Completion Program represents a meaningful, national validation of the work the College’s Division of Continuing Education has undertaken. The program will support individuals who want to design a second career—either out of practical necessity or personal interest,” said Jennifer Saunders, Associate Dean of Continuing Education. “People returning for education and training at this stage of their lives are building on rich employment histories, valuable interpersonal skills, and knowledge achieved through experiential learning. These resources are then being coupled with the most current workforce education.”

The program will be implemented utilizing a variety of strategies, including accelerated classes, flexible scheduling and cohort models, which provide groups of students with similar goals an opportunity to move through a program together.

Since 2008, AACC and its network of Plus 50 Initiative colleges have worked with baby boomers to help them prepare for new careers. An independent evaluation of AACC’s Plus 50 Initiative found that 89 percent of students agreed that college work force training helped them acquire new job skills, and 72 percent attributed landing a job to such training.
“Many adults age 50 and over want to train for new jobs that help others and are hiring, but they need to update their skills. Community colleges offer a supportive environment where baby boomers can train for new jobs quickly and affordably,” said Mary Sue Vickers, director for the Plus 50 Initiative at AACC.

In addition to grant funds to augment training programs, participating colleges gain access to toolkits and extensive marketing resources tailored to reach baby boomers. They’ll also benefit from the advice and support of staff at other community colleges that have successfully implemented programs for older learners and understand the unique needs of the plus 50 student population.

The Plus 50 Encore Completion Program is funded with a $3.2 million grant to AACC provided by Deerbrook Charitable Trust—supporting AACC’s work to increase the number of students who finish degrees, certificates, and other credentials. In April 2010, AACC committed alongside other higher education organizations, to promote the development and implementation of policies, practices and institutional cultures that will produce 50 percent more students with high quality degrees and certificates by 2020.

While the AACC Encore Completion Program focuses on serving the Plus 50 population, Salt Lake Community College welcomes anyone interested in making a career transition to learn more about the broad range of training opportunities available at: www.slcccontinuinged.com.

For more information about the Plus 50 Initiative at AACC, see: http://plus50.aacc.nche.edu.

The Encore Institute at Salt Lake Community College is an innovative program designed for adult learners who want to expand their knowledge through career and personal enrichment courses. The Institute offers flexible class scheduling, non-degree and degree learning experiences and affordable training to deepen or expand the personal and professional skills of students.

The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) is a national organization representing close to 1,200 community, junior and technical colleges nationwide. Community colleges are the largest and fastest growing sector of higher education, enrolling more than 13 million credit and non-credit students annually. More information is available at: http://aacc.nche.edu.

About the College: Salt Lake Community College is an accredited, student-focused, urban college meeting the diverse needs of the Salt Lake community. Home to more than 62,000 students each year, the College is the largest supplier of workforce development programs in the State of Utah. The College is the sole provider of applied technology courses in the Salt Lake area, with 13 sites, an eCampus, and nearly 1,000 continuing education sites located throughout the Salt Lake valley. Personal attention from an excellent faculty is paramount at the College, which maintains a student-to-teacher ratio of less than 20 to 1.

Grimaldi’s Pizzeria To Host Special Dinner for Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Southern Nevada

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

“Grimaldi’s Pizzeria For the Cure” to serve three-course meal for $15 donation on Feb. 25

LAS VEGAS – Grimaldi’s Pizzeria, famous for its award-winning, hand-tossed, coal-fired brick oven pizzas, will host a special dinner for Susan G. Komen of Southern Nevada on Monday, Feb. 25 at the Rainbow restaurant (7155 S. Rainbow Rd.) A three-course meal, including salad, pizza and dessert, will be served for a cash-only donation of $15.

The event is open to the public and two seatings will be offered for guests. The first from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. and the second from 6:30 – 8 p.m. To RSVP for this event call Komen Southern Nevada at 702-822-2524.

“Komen Southern Nevada is a non-profit that is close to many of our employees’ hearts,” said Mikaela Clough, manager of S. Rainbow Grimaldi’s Pizzeria. “Raising funds for an organization that is vital to our community is our way of giving back and we hope that many people will come out and show support.”

“With so many very worthy charitable organizations in our amazing city, we are tremendously grateful to be chosen by Grimaldi’s Pizzeria to be a beneficiary of their fundraising efforts,” said Stephanie Kirby, Executive Director of Komen Southern Nevada. “Las Vegas is a large city based on population, but we are made up of people who feel so strongly about caring for our community and, more importantly, caring for others in our community. Grimaldi’s is a prime example of a business that is determined to make a positive difference.”

About Grimaldi’s Pizzeria:
In the world of pizza, Grimaldi’s is an institution that has garnered more awards than any other pizzeria in the country with more celebrity sightings than most 5-star restaurants. Using only the freshest ingredients, a “secret recipe” pizza sauce, handmade mozzarella cheese and dough, Grimaldi’s serves traditional pizza (as it began in Naples, Italy) in an upscale yet casual, family oriented pizzeria. The intense heat of the oven evenly bakes the pies to create Grimaldi’s famous crispy and smoky thin crust that Zagat has voted best pizza year after year. Grimaldi’s Pizzeria has five locations in Las Vegas and one in Sparks, Nev. Las Vegas locations include The Shoppes at The Palazzo, Rainbow and 215, Boca Park Fashion Village The Fashion Show Mall and Richmar Plaza. The Sparks restaurant is located in The Legends at Sparks Marina.

For more information on Grimaldi’s Pizzeria visit www.grimaldispizzeria.com
“Like” Grimaldi’s Pizzeria on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/GrimaldisPizzeria
Follow Grimaldi’s Pizzeria on Twitter: www.twitter.com/grimaldispizza

About Susan G. Komen of Southern Nevada:

The Southern Nevada Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure® – along with those who generously support the organization with their talent, time and resources – is working to better the lives of those facing breast cancer in our community. Through events like the Komen Southern Nevada Race for the Cure®, we have invested more than $6 million in local breast health and breast cancer projects in Southern Nevada over the past 17 years. Up to 75 percent of net proceeds generated by the Affiliate provide grants for innovative community programs that reduce breast cancer mortality through screening, treatment, education and safety-net services, while the remaining 25 percent supports groundbreaking breast cancer research grants. This year, the Affiliate funded over $837,000 in local breast health programs for the uninsured and underserved in Las Vegas and surrounding areas, while providing $150,000 to breast cancer research.

For more information on Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Southern Nevada visit www.komensouthernnevada.org

Like Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Komen-Southern-Nevada-Race-for-the-Cure/255100881352

New International Federation on Ageing Report Declares Vision Loss No Longer an Inevitable Part of Ageing

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Calls for Investments in Preventive Eye Health to Reduce Social and Economic
Burdens of Vision Loss

The International Federation on Ageing (IFA) today released a new report describing the health, social and economic burdens of vision loss on a global society that is rapidly ageing. The report calls for increased public education and awareness programs, improved public policies and greater integration of preventive eye health interventions into public health systems.

The report, titled “The High Cost of Low Vision: The Evidence on Ageing and the Loss of Sight ,” highlights that vision loss is no longer an inevitable part of the ageing process, as people can now age with strong, healthy vision, given 21st-century innovations in diagnosis, biomedicine, nutrition, technology and preventive care.

“The economic implications are equally huge as we now have it in our grasp to delink vision loss from ageing, which will have great impact on active, productive and more enjoyable ageing. This shift in the traditional perception of ageing is truly transformative,” said Jane Barratt, BSc, MSc, PhD, Secretary General of the IFA. “As 80 percent of vision loss is preventable, it is our ethical responsibility and a public health imperative that we take action now.”

“As the 21st century’s seminal challenge of population ageing leads to increasing prevalence of deteriorating vision, it brings about huge social, personal and economic consequences,” said Kathy Spahn, President and CEO of Helen Keller International. “This report is both timely and critical as a tool for raising awareness of and driving solutions for preventable vision loss, which can have a positive and profound impact on economic growth and the human condition.”

The over-60 population is expected to reach 2 billion by mid-century. As this cohort rapidly grows to become the largest population segment of many societies globally, rates of preventable vision loss are also soaring. Today, 285 million people around the world are visually impaired, including 39 million who are totally blind, and that number will explode without preventive measures. The direct costs of vision impairment worldwide are estimated to reach $2.8 trillion by 2020, and the indirect costs will add another $760 billion.

“IFA’s report highlights the critical need for action and investment in preventive eye health,” said Francisco Rodriguez, MD, Retina and Vitreous Specialist and Scientific Director, Fundación Oftalmológica Nacional in Colombia. “Across the globe, new policies to improve the diagnosis, management and care associated with preventable eye diseases – especially among ageing populations – will go a long way in alleviating the burdens triggered by age-related vision loss.”

“As millions around the world are living longer – bringing about increasing prevalence in visual impairments – global institutions, governments, the scientific and medical communities, payers, patient groups, NGOs and businesses must partner to find innovative solutions to treat and prevent vision loss – one of the greatest challenges of global population ageing,” said Dr. Kemal Malik, Head Global Development at Bayer Healthcare.

The report emphasizes that measures to prevent vision loss are cost-effective and calls for urgent attention in key areas: Download the Executive Summary
Download the Report
Media Contact:
Melissa Mitchell
+1.212.332.3942(T) +1.646.404.1149(M)
mmitchell@globalcoalitiononaging.com
About the International Federation on Ageing
The International Federation on Ageing (IFA)is an international non-governmental organization with a membership base of NGOs, the corporate sector, academia, government, and individuals. IFA aims to generate positive change for older people throughout the world by stimulating, collecting, analyzing, and disseminating information on rights, policies, and practices that improve the quality of life of people as they age.
“The High Cost of Low Vision: The Evidence on Ageing and the Loss of Sight” was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant by Bayer Healthcare to the International Federation on Ageing.

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

Named Finalist for PR News’ CSR Award among Coca-Cola, Disney and UPS

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

A leading showcase for the most powerful corporate social responsibility and green campaigns has named MGM Resorts International (NYSE: MGM) a finalist for its annual awards program in the category of Overall Leader in CSR Practices – more than 10,000 employees.

MGM Resorts is the only company in the gaming industry and the only company headquartered in Nevada to be named a finalist for PR News’ CSR Awards. Other finalists in its award category include Coca-Cola Enterprises, Disney and UPS. The winner will be named at the National Press Club in Washington, DC on February 11, 2013.

“We count it a true honor to be named a finalist for this PR News’ CSR Award and recognized among other great leaders in corporate social responsibility,” said Jim Murren, Chairman and CEO of MGM Resorts International. “We earnestly believe that the health of our company is directly linked to the welfare of the communities in which we operate and so, as Nevada’s largest private employer, we make it a business imperative to be a leader in all forms of corporate social responsibility.”

Finalists for the PR News’ CSR Awards were chosen by an expert panel that evaluated entries submitted by organizations participating in the award competition. The judging criterion included: creativity, innovation, sound planning, implementation and outcomes. Furthermore, organizations were judged according to the alignment of their strategic objectives with their end goals and proven success.

Since the company’s founding, MGM Resorts has shown a powerful commitment to the fundamental principle of social responsibility. The three major initiatives comprising MGM Resorts’ social responsibility efforts are: Diversity & Inclusion, Philanthropy & Community Engagement, and Environmental Sustainability. Program highlights include:
Diversity & Inclusion

• MGM Resorts was the first company in the gaming and hospitality industry to voluntarily adopt a formal diversity and inclusion policy.
• MGM Resorts has increased and maintained the overall representation of women (more than 40%) and minorities (more than 30%) in the diversity profile of our management team for more than half of the past decade.
• Since 2001, through its Supplier and Construction Diversity programs, MGM Resorts has spent a cumulative total of nearly $3 billion with MWDBE suppliers and contractors (i.e., minority-owned, women-owned and disadvantaged business enterprises).
Philanthropy & Community Engagement
• Since its founding in 2002 to 2012, the employee-driven MGM Resorts Foundation has donated almost $50 million to nonprofit organizations for the betterment of American communities.
• In 2011, the corporate giving program contributed to a combined total of more than 500 nonprofit agencies in Nevada, Michigan and Mississippi.
• MGM Resorts’ donation in 2012 of more than 189 tons of canned food to Three Square, the leading Las Vegas food bank, earned the distinction of the largest single company donation in the nonprofit organization’s history for the third year in a row.
• In 2012, MGM Resorts employees logged more than 113,000 volunteer hours and helped more than 850 charitable organizations meet community needs.
Environmental Responsibility
• At more than 18M sf, CityCenter is the largest LEED® Gold certified development in the world.
• MGM Resorts has reduced electricity consumption by 120 million kWh per year, enough to power 10,450 homes each year.
• The company has increased its recycling rate by more than 420% in four years, achieving nearly 40% diversion in 2011.
• MGM Resorts has reduced water usage by 500 million gallons per year, enough to fill more than 750 Olympic-size swimming pools.
• An unprecedented 15 company resorts have achieved the prestigious Green Key rating for environmental conservation from the largest sustainable operations certification body in the world, Green Key Global.

For more information about MGM Resorts International’s commitment to social responsibility, please visit: http://www.mgmresorts.com/offers/2012/07_annualcorporatesocialresponsibilityreport/index.html.

MGM Resorts International (NYSE: MGM) is one of the world’s leading global hospitality companies, operating destination resort brands including Bellagio, MGM Grand, Mandalay Bay and The Mirage. The Company also owns 51% of MGM China Holdings Limited, which owns the MGM Macau resort and casino and is in the process of developing a gaming resort in Cotai, and 50% of CityCenter in Las Vegas, which features ARIA resort and casino. For more information about MGM Resorts International, visit the Company’s website at www.mgmresorts.com.
For more information, please contact:
Rey Bouknight
Director, Corporate Communications
Phone: (702) 234-3714
Phone 2: (702) 891-1846

Nevada-Senior-Guide Southwest Medical

November 5, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

http://www.smalv.com/

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NSG_AugSeptOct2016_Web-39

About Us

YESTERDAY Southwest Medical Associates (SMA)  traces its beginnings back to 1972, when Anthony M. Marlon, MD first established  a private medical practice in Las Vegas. His goal? To provide compassionate and  innovative health care services. Because of his vision, his small practice  quickly grew. Today, we’re one of Nevada’s largest multispecialty medical  groups. And, although we’ve grown, we haven’t lost sight of our original  commitment –  to provide our patients with comprehensive, affordable  medical care.

AND TODAY We’re dedicated to providing you with the  best health care possible. Our advanced technological capabilities and  state-of-the-art equipment, combined with our passion for people, makes us the  right choice for you and your family. With decades of experience and over 13  specialties and programs, SMA is the trusted name in health care in the Las  Vegas Valley.

Our Community

SERVICE. KNOWLEDGE. COMMITMENT. We  have a long history of community service and philanthropy.     Whether it’s in collaboration with the Boy Scouts of America, the  College of Southern Nevada Foundation, the Human Rights Campaign, the March of  Dimes and the United Way, or through our employees, we’re helping individuals,  families and communities live healthier lives.

By giving our  time, talents and financial resources, we hope to advance health, education and  well-being.

Our Volunteer  Program offers the opportunity to learn about the medical field or give back to  the community while helping someone in need.

University of  Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) School of Nursing Grant will be used to fund two  graduate fellowships in the Master of Nursing (MSN) program and two graduate  fellowships in the Doctor of Nursing (Ph.D.) program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

http://www.nvaging.net/

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) in the State of Nevada, Department of Health and Human Services, represents Nevadans aged 60 years and older and those with disabilities.

Mission Statement The Aging and Disability Services Division provides leadership and advocacy in the planning, development and delivery of a high quality, comprehensive support service system across the lifespan. This allows all of Nevada’s elders, adults and children with disabilities or special health care needs to live independent, meaningful, and dignified lives in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs. Developmental Services

State of Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD)

Programs/Services

 

Advocate for Elders

Advocacy, assistance, information and referral to frail seniors, who are 60 years of age or older, primarily homebound and living in the community, and their caregivers.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)

Provides citizen-centered “one-stop” entry points into the long-term support system. Serves individuals in need of long-term support, caregivers, and those planning for future long-term support needs.

Assisted Living (AL) Waiver

Assisted living supportive services to eligible individuals in a residential facility as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Community Options Program for the Elderly (COPE)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement. Similar to the HCBW Program.

 

Disability Rx (External link) Assistance with the cost of prescription medicines to qualified individuals with disabilities.

 

Disability Services (External link)The Office of Disability Services provides resources at the community level which promote equal opportunity and life choices for people with disabilities through which they may positively contribute to Nevada.

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

For persons 60 years old and older who may experience abuse, neglect, exploitation, or isolation.

 

Grants

Information for current and/or prospective grantees.

 

Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW formerly CHIP)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Homemaker Program

General housekeeping, limited meal preparation, shopping, laundering, errands, standby assistance with bathing, and home management services.

 

IDEA Part C Office

Provides oversight of Part C (early intervention services) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Addresses issues and problems faced by residents in long term care facilities, which includes residential facilities for groups.

 

Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

The goal of the SMP program is to empower seniors to prevent Medicare/health care fraud through outreach and education.

 

Senior Rx

Nevada’s plan to provide Nevada seniors relief from the high cost of prescription medicine.

 

Senior Tax Assistance/Rent Rebate Program

This program is no longer available.

 

State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP)

Medicare Counseling Information

Counseling and assistance to Medicare Beneficiaries in Nevada, utilizing a statewide network of volunteers.

 

Taxi Assistance Program (TAP)

Discounted taxicab fares to seniors and persons with disabilities in Clark County. (Washoe County also has a program of this type.

 

 

Waiver for the Elderly in Adult Residential Care (WEARC)

Non-medical services in a group care setting to offer individuals a less expensive alternative of supervised care in a residential setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Medicine Disposal Program

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.paininthedrain.com

PAIN IN THE DRAIN

IN THE COMMUNITY!

Did You Know… …You can dispose of your expired and unused medicine at any Police Department in Clark County?
Drop Boxes are now located in the lobby of the Boulder City Police Department, the City of Henderson Police Department Substations, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department substations, the North Las Vegas Police Department substations and the Mesquite Plice Department substations.

Don’t Rush to Flush!  Dispose of your expired medicines properly!

Only public employees may access public manholes for maintenance or monitoring activities. Other, illegal discharges might result in:

  • Clogged or overflowing sewer lines
  • Disruption of wastewater treatment plant processes
  • Damage to sewer lines and laterals
  • Buildup of toxic gases in the lines
  • Harmful discharges into the environment

An example of an illegal discharge is a commercial vacuum truck dumping its contents of grease interceptors, sand/oil interceptors and septic tanks into the sewer system. Illegal dumping into public manholes is most likely to occur at night and away from major streets. If you see a potentially unauthorized discharge, please contact the Water Reclamation District at 702-668-8354.

Introducing F.O.G.G.

The Clark County Water Reclamation District and the Cities of Las Vegas, Henderson and North Las Vegas have teamed up to ask our residents to Just Can It! and help keep cooking fat, oils, grease and grit (FOGG) out of our community’s sewer systems. These agencies maintain extensive collection systems of several thousand miles of pipeline underneath the streets to deliver wastewater from homes, businesses and schools to the treatment facilities.
We call it wastewater, but it is not wasted at all. We reclaim every drop of this valuable resource by treating it to very high levels until suitable for reuse- for golf courses, soccer fields, industrial cooling and, most importantly, for return to Lake Mead and the Colorado River system for Return Flow Credits. In order to clean the water to the very high standards necessary, these agencies must keep the wastewater flowing through the pipelines to reach the plants for treatment.

F.O.G.G. FAQs

Q:  What is FOGG, and is it a problem? A:  FOGG is made up of fat, oil, grease, and grit, and it is a very BIG problem! FOGG does not mix with water because its components are insoluble and have a tendency to separate from a liquid solution. When fat, oil and grease are poured down the drain, they stick to the sewer pipe walls creating layers of buildup that restrict the wastewater flow. This problem requires pipes to be cleaned more frequently, causes pipes to be replaced sooner than expected, and causes blockages that can result in sewer overflows.

Q:  How does fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) create a sewer blockage? A:  Fat, oil, grease, and grit in a warm, liquid form may appear to be harmless since they flow easily down the drain. However, as the liquid cools, the FOGG solidifies and floats to the top of the other liquid in the sewer pipes. The layer of FOGG sticks to the sewer pipes and over time, the flow of wastewater becomes restricted and can cause a backup or overflow. The gritty particles, including coffee grinds, eggshells, aquarium gravel, grain, rice, seeds, etc. get trapped in the greasy buildup, accelerating the problem rapidly.
Over time, FOGG accumulates in the sewer system in much the same way that cholesterol accumulates in our arteries. As FOGG builds in the pipes, wastewater becomes increasingly restricted. Suddenly, sometimes without warning, a sewer pipe backs up and overflows, similar to a heart attack. The result is a home flooded with sewage, or sewage overflowing in the street, where it flows – untreated – into area waterways.

Q:  What products contain fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) A:  Fat, oil, grease and grit are natural by-products of the cooking and food preparation process. Common sources include food scraps, meat fats, cooking oils, lard, baked goods, salad dressings, sauces, marinades, dairy products, shortening, butter and margarine, coffee grinds, eggshells, grain, rice, seeds, etc. Anything put through the garbage disposal adds to the buildup.

Q:  What can I do to keep fat, oil, grease, and grit (FOGG) out of the sewer and help prevent a grease related sewer overflow from occurring in my house or on my street? A:  Everyone plays a role in preventing FOGG from damaging our sewer system. The following easy tips can help prevent a sewer overflow in your home or neighborhood.

  1. Fat, oil, grease, and grit should NEVER be poured down the sink. Sink drains and garbage disposals are not designed to handle these materials properly.
  2. Before washing, scrape and dry wipe pots, pans and dishes with paper towels and dispose of materials in the trash.
  3. Pour fat, oil, grease and grit into a disposable container, such as an empty glass jar or coffee can. Once the liquid has cooled and solidified, secure the lid and place the container in the trash.
  4. Disconnect, or at least minimize use of the garbage disposal to get rid of food scraps. The garbage disposal chops up food into small pieces, but can still cause a blockage in the pipe. Use sink strainers to catch food items, and then empty the strainer into the trash.

Q:  Why is it important to dispose of FOGG properly? A:  Sewer system maintenance in neighborhoods that experience sewer blockages and backups due to fat, oil, grease, and grit is expensive and can contribute to the amount that customers pay for sewer service. A sewer blockage or backup can also result in expensive repairs to the home.

Q:  What should I do if I experience a sewer blockage or overflow? A:  Call your sewer service provider at one of the following numbers:

  • Clark County Water Reclamation District: 702-434-6600
  • City of Las Vegas: 702-229-6594
  • City of Henderson: 702-267-2500
  • City of North Las Vegas: 702-633-1275

Pain in the Drain | Why Flushing is Bad

Why Flushing is a Bad Idea When you flush medication down your drain, it ends up at one of our treatment facilities. These ingredients can remain in the treated water when it is released into the water cycle. Handful of PillsWhen prescription or over-the-counter drugs are flushed down the sink or toilet, their chemical components may be added to the water supply. The presence of these substances in the environment is emerging as an important national and international issue. Although the concentration levels of these products in the environment is very low, research and monitoring are continuing worldwide.
Putting medications down the drain is not just a local concern. Increasingly, prescription and non-prescription medications, many of which are not effectively destroyed by sewage treatment plants, are finding their way into streams and drinking water supplies. A study conducted by the United States Geological Survey found that 80 percent of the 139 streams sampled across 30 states detected very low concentrations of chemicals commonly found in prescription drugs. While the concentration levels of these products are very low, they may be enough to cause adverse effects in the environment and to human health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide McKnight Senior Village – Las Vegas

http://www.pinnacleams.com/McKnightII/

McKnight Senior Village

Single Story 1 Bedroom Cottages From $508 Per Month!651 McKnight Street(702) 380-0666Directions:
From US 95, exit Eastern north to Bonanza. Go east on Bonanza to McKnight Street, turn left. We will be on your left.571 North 30th Street(702) 383-8114Directions: From US 95, exit Eastern north to Bonanza. Go east on Bonanza to North 30 Street, turn right on 30th. Sunrise will be on your right.Features:
  • Fully gated community
  • Gas grills/gazebo
  • Laundry facilities
  • Refrigerator/dishwasher
  • Ceiling fans/large pantry
  • Spacious walk -in closet
  • Washer/Dryer hook-ups
  • Berber carpet
  • Planned activities
  • Transportation to casino and grocer

McKnight Senior is an affordable luxurious apartment community designed specifically for independent adults! Located in Las Vegas, Nevada, McKnight Senior goes the extra mile offering a wide range of services and programs to help you stay involved and active. Our Resident Activity Coordinator reassures that you will be welcomed into the community and connected to the services you need. McKnight offers everything from exercise and water aerobics programs to continuing education, social activities and free scheduled transportation. Residents can also enjoy large patios, bingo and poker night, European cabinetry and walk-in closets. Our ideal location in Las Vegas puts you minutes from fine dining and multiple shopping centers. You’ll also have easy access to the strip and the Las Vegas Expressway.

Lease today at McKnight Senior apartments!

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!