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volunteer | Nevada Senior Guide

Giving to the Next Generation

September 12, 2017 by · Comments Off on Giving to the Next Generation
Filed under: Articles 

(Family Features) From self-expression to self-direction, there are countless ways to age out loud. Some of the most rewarding ways for older adults involve passing on experiences, wisdom and skills to others.

Everyone has something to share, and these ideas from the Administration of Community Living can help you get started.

Mentor. Use professional or personal experiences to guide a child, young adult or peer. Example: Visit Senior Corps at nationalservice.gov to learn about becoming a foster grandparent.

Volunteer. Put skills to use while giving back to your community. Example: Sign up to collect food or clothing donations, serve meals at a local soup kitchen or help older adults with daily tasks at home, such as paying bills.

Teach. Impart expertise via formal or informal education and tutoring opportunities. Example: Check with local schools that may need reading, math or science tutors.

Speak. Sign up for speaking engagements, paid or unpaid, as well as storytelling events. Example: Open-mic events, often at theaters and libraries, welcome speakers of all ages.

Engage. Visit a senior center or organize a gathering focused on connecting with others. Example: Book clubs attract participants of all ages and encourage the exchange of ideas.

Write. Pen an article, op-ed or even a book to communicate wisdom and lessons learned. Example: Start with something you know the most about, such as a career, hobby or historical event, and submit a column to your local newspaper.

Create. Pick a medium and use art to express yourself and share your perspective. Example: Paint, draw, sculpt, play music, dance, make crafts – whatever suits you.

These ideas and many others can help amplify the voices of older Americans and raise awareness of vital aging issues in communities across the nation. Find more ideas at oam.ACL.gov.

 

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias

June 12, 2016 by · Comments Off on Mature Age Job Seekers – Beating the Bias
Filed under: General 

Australian business is starting to see the light when it comes to their hiring policies for mature aged employees, and the positive impact they can have on the workplace. A brief visit to main street shopping centre and you will begin to see a few more weathered faces at work than you would have seen a few years ago.

However, if you scratch below the surface, you begin to see this trend still has a long way to play out. A few older workers get hired into the senior ranks where experience and maturity are greatly valued, more older workers are now being hired at the lower end of the corporate scale into unskilled roles, however the numbers being hired into the mid tier ranks remains low.

This barbell approach to hiring mature workers at the top and bottom of an organisation reflects an ongoing bias that remains difficult to overcome. A company is a microcosm of society, and in a perfect world employers should (within reason) seek diversity in the workplace and value skill, experience and aptitude, regardless of age, race or gender.

Unfortunately, we live in a far from perfect world. When it comes to mature aged workers they tend to be penalised on two fronts. Often the first to be made redundant in uncertain economic times, this setback is then compounded when they are regularly overlooked for someone younger as they begin searching for a new job.

As a result of these two biases towards mature aged job seekers, once out of work, the journey back can often be long and arduous. This is reflected in RBA statistics which indicate long-term unemployment at approximately 40% for those aged 45-64, compared to about 25% for those aged between 25 and 44.

So what are the reasons employers provide for not hiring mature aged workers? Typically, reasons include being overqualified or over-experienced. Taken at face value being overqualified or experienced might not seem so bad, but when you hear the same reason trotted out time and again, it becomes less palatable.

Openly negative feedback from employers tend to include perceptions that mature aged workers are not as IT savvy, do not possess the latest skills, or are not as flexible as their younger counterparts. While these reasons may hold true in many instances, many of the older job seekers I speak to, believe these are often used as convenient excuses to exclude them.

Employer feedback that you are not likely to hear include concerns about health (and subsequent cost) or worse insecurity. There are many poor managers in the workplace that may be intimidated by the experience a mature applicant brings to the role. Rather than leveraging the knowledge and experience an older worker can bring to the workplace, the insecure hirer is concerned about the potential competition, and the presence of someone who may know more than they do.

Dealing with many of these preconceived concerns and fears remains an ongoing challenge for the mature aged job seeker. Perhaps the following facts should be mandatory reading for hiring managers. These facts debunk many of the concerns and myths that persist in the workplace relating to mature aged workers;

    • Mature aged workers can deliver cost savings to employers through increased retention rates. For example, workers over 55 are five times less likely to change jobs compared to workers aged 20-24, reducing both recruitment and training costs. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Labour Mobility Survey,
    • Mature workers can deliver an average net benefit of $1956 per year to their employer compared to other workers due to high retention rates, lower rates of absenteeism, decreased recruitment costs and greater return on investment.Business, Work and Ageing (2000) Profiting from Maturity: The Social and Economic Costs of Mature Age Unemployment
    • Australians are living longer and are healthier.2005 ABS survey found the proportion of Australians aged 55-64 reporting their health as ‘good’, ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ was 75.5% – an increase of four per cent since 1995. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) National Health Survey: Summary of Results, 2004-05
    • Mature workers were the least likely group to take days off due to their own illness or as a carer. In the two week period prior to the survey nearly half the number of mature workers had days off compared to workers aged 25-34. ibid
    • ABS data shows that Australians aged 55-64 are the fastest growing users of information technology. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2005) Year Book Australia,
  • Australian Health Management which examined the daily work habits of 4000 employees found that workers aged 55 years and over performed at their best for approximately seven hours out of an eight-hour day-an achievement that other workers in the study were unable to match. Australian Health Management (2006), Baby boomers give employers a bang for their buck

While government has been doing its part to address mature aged unemployment through initiatives like DEEWR Experience+, the introduction of the Age Discrimination Act (2004) and appointment of an Age Discrimination Commissioner, it remains imperative that older job seekers directly address some of these age bias issues themselves if they are to enhance their prospects for employment.

Following are some helpful hints that mature aged workers can utilise to make themselves more appealing to employers and thus improve their chances of a speedy return to the workforce;

Government or Community Assistance– Take advantage of government or community based initiatives and assistance. There is a considerable amount of free information and assistance available, and I would strongly recommend looking into these resources. For example, the DEEWR “Experience+” initiative provides free career planning and advice for over 45’s until June 2016, along with an Assistance Program delivering refresher and basic training in IT and social media applications.

Value Proposition– Whether writing your resume or cover letter, or sitting in an interview, ensure the focus of discussion clearly remains on the value that you can bring to an organisation. Discuss how you can help, what you have done in the past and what you can deliver going forward. Outline how your experience might bring special insights and perspectives that other candidates may not possess.

Training– Undertake relevant training or up-skilling. Keeping ‘up to date’ is critical if you expect serious consideration for any position, especially if there is a technical element. The benefit will be that an employer will see that you have not fallen behind and therefore will not require retraining, along with any associated cost.

Resume– You will need a properly structured and well written resume to be considered for most roles. Use an appropriate resume style that is tailored to your strengths, skills and experience. Also ensure primary focus of your resume is on the last 5-10 years (include older information where pertinent). Think about getting assistance from a professional resume writer, whocan add significant value if you are looking to ‘get it right the first time’.

Age Bias – To counter potential impact of age bias, you will need to carefully address the following with any potential employer;

Health– Don’t hesitate to communicate your good health and fitness to potential employers at opportune moments. Inform them if you play sport, run, walk or go to the gym regularly. This should allay any potential concerns about health.

IT Savvy –Take every opportunity to indicate your IT capability. Whether it’s your ability to use specialised systems, the MS Office suite or even your use of Facebook or Twitter, this will highlight your ability to embrace new technology.

Adaptability – Highlight your adaptability in the workplace, providing actual examples where appropriate. If you don’t know something, indicate you are keen to learn (and not that you wouldn’t know where to start). Highlighting your adaptability will help to dispel concerns of rigidness and inflexibility.

Team Player –Communicating that you work well as part of a team is critical. It shows a willingness to take direction and work for the common good, and can present you as less threatening, especially if the hirer feels concerned by a mature more experienced candidate.

Be Positive –Though you need to be fully prepared to discuss negative issues, make every attempt to keep the discussion on a positive footing. Unless specifically requested, there is no need to volunteer information of a negative nature.

While industry is beginning to see the light when it comes to acceptance of mature aged workers, the pace of change remains slow. While providence is on the right side due to the ageing Australian population and the inevitable necessity to hire older workers, the fact remains that age discrimination is still entrenched in much current thinking.

As a result, dealing with age bias will continue to be a challenge for the foreseeable future. However with the combination of positive government policy, changing attitudes and a proactive attitude to making oneself more appealing to employers (as outlined above), the situation is not without promise.

Honing your individual approach and message will take time and effort. To strike the right balance the mature job seeker will need to walk a fine line between sounding experienced, but not old, adaptable, but not inflexible and appear keen, not desperate. There is no magic formula for success except practice, perseverance and occasionally seeking help where necessary.

A.J. Bond, is the proprietor of Absolute Resume Writing Services ( http://absoluteresume.com.au ), an Australian based consultancy specializing in the provision of Resume and Cover Letter writing services.

Absolute Resume assists a broad range of job seekers to find their preferred roles, including mature aged job seekers, individuals out of work for a period of time and those made redundant.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7334746

The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

Free Senior Safety Fair – Seniors And Law Enforcement Together – (S.A.L.T.) Council and the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

March 18, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Seniors And Law Enforcement Together – (S.A.L.T.) Council and the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) are asking for support at an important annually sponsored event.

 

The SALT Council and SMP will be holding it’s free “Senior Safety Fair” on Wednesday, May 14th 2014 at Clark County’s Paradise Community Center located at 4775 South McLeod Drive 89121.

The SALT Council is comprised of core members to include but not limited to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police, North Las Vegas Police Department, State of Nevada Elder Protective Services, Southern Nevada Senior Law Program, Nevada Senior Services, Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP), Nevada State Attorney General’s Office, City of Las Vegas, Clark County, City of Henderson, Clark County District Attorney, ITN Las Vegas Valley, S. Nevada Transit Coalition, Nevada 2-1-1, Social Service Providers, Professional Senior Service Providers, and Volunteer Senior Citizens and Clark County Coroner and Medical Examiner’s Office just to name a few.

 

S.A.L.T. is a full non-profit 501c3.

 

The group is looking assistance in getting the word out to all southern Nevada senior citizens about this free safety event to help increase all safety and prevention methods for our seniors residents.

 

If you have any questions please contact Kim Harney-Moore (SMP) or Carol Ferranti (LVMPD) (contact info are listed below):

 

Kim Harney-Moore; SMP Director
Nevada Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)
Empowering Seniors to Prevent Healthcare Fraud
702-486-4323
kkharneymoore@adsd.nv.gov

 

OR

 

Carol Ferranti; Crime Prevention Specialist
Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department – South Central Area Command (SCAC)
4860 Las Vegas Blvd. South
Las Vegas, NV 89119
Office: 702-828-8163
C7859F@lvmpd.com

Red Cross Blood Products Prolong Life of Two-Year-Old Las Vegan

December 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Two-year-old Sawyer Balonek of Las Vegas has been diagnosed with Bruton Agammaglobulinemia, an inherited immunodeficiency disease.  He has to have an infusion of immunoglobulin every four weeks from plasma extracted from blood given by volunteer donors.

 

The blood products needed by Sawyer are provided by the American Red Cross.  The Red Cross is the predominant blood supplier in Las Vegas and has held several blood drives in Sawyer’s honor to help make sure he gets the blood products he needs.  Sawyer’s parents agree that Sawyer is alive today because of the excellent medical care he has received and the blood products provided by the Red Cross.

 

In 2010 a group of local hospitals invited the Red Cross to bid for the contract to supply blood in southern Nevada.  The Red Cross won the contract, supplanting United Blood Services (UBS) as the provider of blood products for nine of the 14 hospitals in Las Vegas.  In order to meet the demand, the Red Cross strives to collect almost 900 units per week.

 

According to Julia Wulf, chief executive  officer of the American Red Cross Blood Service Region, “It is very challenging for us to collect enough blood in Las Vegas to meet the needs of the southern Nevada hospitals we serve.  We need more donors and we need businesses, churches and other organizations to sponsor blood drives here.”

 

To make an appointment to donate blood, call 1-800-RED CROSS or visit redcrossblood.org.

 

For more information about scheduling a blood drive call (702) 522-3998.

 

#   #   #

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

105-Year-Old Woman Surprised With New Car from Anonymous Fan

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

105-Year-Old Woman Surprised With New Car from Anonymous Fan

Gift enables California’s oldest driver to continue volunteering regularly at Direct Relief

California’s oldest driver, 105-year-old Edythe Kirchmaier, received a big surprise when she was gifted a brand new car from an anonymous fan.

Kirchmaier has a perfect 86-year driving record with no accidents, parking, or moving violations. She renewed her driver’s license this January after passing her test with flying colors.

The longtime Santa Barbara resident garnered international attention earlier this year with appearances on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and Access Hollywood Live in which she inspired the world to make a difference by raising awareness for her beloved charity, Direct Relief.

As the oldest registered Facebook user, Kirchmaier’s 105th birthday wish was to get 105,000 people to like Direct Relief’s Facebook page by lighting a candle on the world’s largest virtual birthday cake that the humanitarian organization created for her.

Kirchmaier was given a brand new 2013 Honda Civic after the anonymous fan heard her 1997 minivan was having lots of break downs and needing many repairs, jeopardizing her ability to continue volunteering at Direct Relief, as she has for the past 40 years.

Driving since she was 19, Kirchmaier learned to drive on a Ford Model T.  

About Direct Relief
Direct Relief is a leading medical relief organization, active in all 50 states and in 70 countries. It works with more than 1,000 health clinics across the U.S. to assist in emergencies and an ongoing basis, providing them with free medications for people in need. The organization has been among the world’s largest medical suppliers in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, has top charity ratings, including four-star and “top-notch” rating from Charity Navigator, and a 99% fundraising efficiency rating from Forbes magazine. For more information visit www.DirectRelief.org.

CONTACT:
Kerri Murray, (805) 452-7599
kmurray@directrelief.org

Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

Caregiver nominations taken online at www.twilightwish.org until October 15

The national nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving are pleased to announce the “Caring for the Caregiver” award. According to a recently released Bureau of Labor Statistics survey, over 39 million Americans provide hours of unpaid care to someone over the age of 65. Caregivers often struggle with their own physical, financial and mental needs. This program was created to recognize and reward these deserving senior caregivers who often put their own needs last by providing a respite from caregiving duties.

“Often, caregivers are seen as hidden patients themselves,” said Cass Forkin, founder of Twilight Wish. “Although caregiving is a labor of love to many, the stress and strain of providing around-the- clock care often takes a toll on the caregivers, both mentally and physically.”

According to David Spain, CEO of Parentgiving, many caregivers are often not able to get the break from their responsibilities that they need. “This program offers caregivers the chance to relax and rejuvenate, away from their daily duties,” said Spain. “We want them to know that their selfless contributions and dedication are appreciated.”

Twilight Wish and Parentgiving chose August 21 to launch “Caring for the Caregiver” because it’s National Senior Citizens Day, first proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan in 1988. “Older citizens are reinforcing their historical roles as leaders and as links with our patrimony and sense of purpose as individuals and as a Nation,” said the late president.

Anyone can nominate a deserving caregiver by filling out an application at www.twilightwish.org.  Caregivers can nominate themselves. Entries will be accepted through October 15, 2013. The winner will be notified in early November 2013. The “Caring for the Caregiver” award may be a two-night hotel stay, restaurant meal(s), spa treatment(s), or tickets to an event or any combination of these as chosen by the award winner. The winner will also receive free in-home caregiving services from a local senior homecare organization, ensuring a worry-free getaway.

Twilight Wish Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization whose mission is to honor and enrich the lives of deserving seniors through wish granting celebrations that connect generations. Since its founding in 2003, Twilight Wish has granted over 1,931 individual wishes to deserving, low-income seniors, thanks to volunteers, corporate and community involvement, and donations. Recent wishes granted include a visit from a string band for a nursing home resident’s 89th birthday, transporting a nursing home resident to Christmas Eve dinner with family, and hearing aids for an Army veteran who wished to be able to hear his grandchildren’s voices. For more, visit www.twilightwish.org.

Parentgiving.com is a leading online destination for seniors and their caregivers, offering a wealth of information on eldercare, news, Q&As with experts, and healthy aging resources as well as a store with thousands of homecare products and medical supplies, delivered right to the home. Bestsellers include walkers, bed rails, bath safety bars, incontinence supplies, and daily living aids. For more, visit www.Parentgiving.com. For more about Parentgiving’s mission, contact Julie Davis at 203-984-4424.

For more about the “Caring for the Caregiver Award,” contact Mary Farrell, Twilight Wish Director of Community Relations, 215-230-8777 ext. 103

Read more news from Parentgiving

Circle of Life Community Hospice – Reno Nevada

August 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Reno 

www.colhospice.com

COL-Logo-New_CS6-2

Circle of Life Hospice helps people in the advanced stages of a chronic or terminal illness who have made the decision to live their remaining days with dignity and surrounded by compassionate caregivers. Our hospice team consists of nurses, aides, social workers, spiritual care advisers, physicians, volunteers, dietitians, therapists and bereavement counsel with that will facilitate helping you “live with” versus “dying from” an illness.

If we can help you see death through new eyes , it will help you to transform your grieving process and change how you view your world, forever.

We have learned from our patients that the Art of Living at the end of life is a time of life that can involve tremendous personal and spiritual growth.

Circle of Life Hospice

1575 Delucchi Lane,

Suite 214

Reno, NV 89502

775-827-2298

Ways You Can Get a Senior Citizen Up and Active Again by Kristie Brown

August 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Expert Author Kristie Brown

Ask almost any senior citizen if they prefer to just sit around and take things easy, and they’re going to tell you “no way”. Mistakenly many of us equate an advanced age with lack of vitality and interest in the world around them, but as people are living longer, they’re retaining these characteristics well into their golden years. It’s possible you may know a senior who is somewhat limited in mobility or crippled up with arthritis, but you’ll find that if you suggest an activity, they’ll be more than willing to go with you. Here are some ideas for getting them up and active again:

1. If the person is lonely and enjoys company, you might be able to interest them in going to a local senior center or joining some type of club. Here they can find the companionship they seek, meet new friends, and enjoy activities with peers. In the beginning it may be difficult to get the person to go, because something new can be a challenge to anyone. Talk to the director of the center or club and find out when a good time to visit might be. Maybe there’s a time when the center isn’t very busy so that your senior wouldn’t be intimidated by a whole room full of strangers. You could invite them to go to dinner with you at a center potluck, or entice them with some of the activities you know they’d particularly enjoy. Once you get them involved, it’s a sure bet they’ll want to go back again and again.

2. Volunteering offers unique experiences for willing seniors. The different types of jobs abound, and your loved one will be sure to find something out there that he or she enjoys doing. Not only do these activities involve working as productive members of the community, but they can also come with perks, such as free dinners, small gifts, and service recognition awards. A senior who has been busy their entire lifetime doesn’t like to feel that they aren’t able to be an active part of the work community any longer. They can begin feeling depressed and worthless. Volunteering will demonstrate to them that they still have plenty to give and that their efforts are appreciated.

3. With the help of your senior, plan a get-together for others in the age group who live nearby in order to establish friendships. This is especially important when the person reaches an age where they are losing friends and need to find other people to share their world. Make sure to allow the senior to help with everything from planning to clean up. You may have to modify tasks to their abilities, but you also might find them working rings around you, because older folks have strong work ethics. Plan a simple menu and a few “get to know you” games to break the ice. They will have a lot to talk about, because they have shared similar experiences, such as the Great Depression, health problems, parenting,and other events from their lifetimes.

Need additional information on home care Maple Grove? Get high quality, customized home care that fits your needs here: home care.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kristie_Brown

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

A Senior Citizen In Juvenile Hall by Eva Fry

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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It was my first time speaking at Juvenile Hall, I was terrified! I had seen enough movies to know I didn’t want to be there. As I hurried through the metal detectors, and pushed through the big metal doors, my heart was pounding and I was filled with fear. I wondered if I would get out of this place alive.

I passed the holding tanks, rooms with big windows containing kids who had just been arrested. In there were kids pacing, fighting addictions, fearfully waiting to be assigned to a unit. Some kids were right at home. They knew this place! They had been there before.

When I stepped into the inner sanctum I heard sounds that confirmed my fears. Angry kids were screaming, using profane language. I heard loud pounding on the doors, which dotted the narrow hallways. Juvenile inmates were communicating through the thick cement walls. As I scurried along, I saw empty eyes piercing out at me through the small, eye level windows of their rooms. I passed through more metal doors and hallways, until I came to the unit I was to speak in. Inside sat fifty young men, of all nationalities. I knew from their varying hair color. Their backs were toward me. They were juveniles from the age of 15 to 17.

As I slowly walked to the front of the room, I made sure there was a guard on either side, in case one of them grabbed me. I took a deep breath and turned toward them. My heart stopped! I was shocked! They were just kids! I expected them to look like criminals, but they looked like they could be one of my nine grandkids.

Although some did appear tough, and others rough, there was something about them that touched me. At that moment, my life changed! A still small voice inside me said, “you must try to help them!”

Thus began my continuing, nine-year mission, to help kids who are in trouble with the law. These are my kids. “The Forgotten Kid.” The children we think we can lock up, throw away the key, and forget. The ones who learned most of the bad things they have done, from us, the older generation. They are kids, paying the price for the sins of society. Our scapegoats

There are up to 600 kids locked up, in this facility, at any time. The Hall houses kids from the age of 10 to 18, although I saw a nine-year and ten-year-old carrying blankets and pillows. Were they going camping?
No! They were headed to their rooms, to be locked up, for armed robbery.

BE A WINNER IN LIFE IS MY PROGRAM. I help the kids believe they can still be WINNERS. I teach them they have potential to do amazing things with their life. In fact, I believe God sent them to this earth to do good with their lives. I tell them each one is a genius, in their own way, and can do something better than anyone else can do. They must find their genius. They must go to school, obey the law, obey their parents, be honest and work hard. My goal is to share with them the same truths I taught my kids: the basic truths of right and wrong.

I hope to support the parents who are good parents, but their kids got on the wrong track. I try to teach the ones with bad parents, or no parents, values they were never taught: basic principals of good and bad.

How did I start speaking at Juvenile Hall? It began a long time ago, when I was a little girl, the daughter of an alcoholic father who emotionally damaged my mother and us kids. I grew up in circumstances similar to some of these young wards.

I speak to them because I would have loved to have had someone, who cared, talk to me when I was young.

Some of these kids, like me, are the off spring of parents who didn’t care how their actions affected their kids. We were from homes full of contention caused by parents with addictions. Sick parents who were unable to control their own lives, let alone parent a child. So-called parents, who lived in their own hell and created havoc in the lives of their children. Parents who abandoned their kids.

When I talk to the kids, I relate to the ones who hope to fix their parents, and those who must care for their siblings. I relate because I remember pouring my Dad’s alcohol down the drain, thinking it would fix our problems but instead, I got myself into lots of trouble. I remember taking money from my Dad’s pocket, after he passed out, to give to my Mom. Money for food.

I remember the day I realized that whatever I did at home would change nothing. I would never have the loving family I longed for. Like many of these kids, I turned to friends for the family I needed. Like them, they were usually the wrong kids of friends, peers who were doing bad things. I remember drinking alcohol, even though I hated it, so I could fit in.

I hear my same story, over and over again, at Juvenile Hall.

To help them I share a profound truth, which I discovered in my young life. “Bad things happen for a reason!”

My bad thing: after a wasted life, at the age of 57, my Dad died an alcoholic. His drink of choice was 100% over proof rum. The good thing: My Dad’s death led to me realize I didn’t want to end up like him, or give my kids the life he gave me. I eventually made a commitment to stop drinking and change my life. Thankfully I was young and not an alcoholic, like my Father and Grandfather.

My commitment worked! I share with them how wonderfully my life has turned out, because of one small choice. I used my Dad’s mistakes to choose a better life for myself. I now have the life I dreamed about. My husband and I have been happily married for 45 years and with our children and grandchildren, are a close knit, happy, non-drinking family.

I tell them, “you can turn the bad things which have happened in your life into motivation for a better life too.” I help them believe they still have time to change.

Another reason I speak at Juvenile Hall is because I was a victim of a drunk driver. At the age of 17, the car I was riding in was hit head-on by a drunk driver. My head went through the windshield. My nose and part of my ear was torn off. Thankfully doctors put me back together, but I came to realize the terrible carnage alcohol could cause. I’ve had a mission all my life to teach the evils of alcohol use. I was a speaker for Mother’s Against Drunk Driving for several years. In fact, they were the ones who first sent me to speak at Juvenile Hall.

I teach the kids to abstain from alcohol and drugs. I have commitment cards, which I encourage them to sign and honor. I know if I can help them make a commitment not to drink alcohol, or use drugs; they will have a better chance at changing their lives and reaching their potential. They don’t need alcohol or drugs in their life. Most of the kids are locked up because of their first drink of alcohol, which lead to drug use and criminal behavior.

One of the questions people always ask me is “what is it like to talk to young criminals? Do they listen to you?”

My answer is, “at first it took a little time to know what to say and how to say it, so they would accept me. It took me time to overcome my fear of knowing how to communicate with them and have them accept me.”

One night, one of them asked, “why do you come to Juvenile Hall?” I answered, “why do you think?” His response, “for the money!” I replied, “no one pays me, in fact the first time I spoke, someone stole the hub caps from my car.” His mouth fell open and then he really listened to my program.

I’m happy to say I do very well with them! The kids are very attentive. They know I care. I don’t judge them. In most cases, I don’t know what their crime is. I don’t want to know. I tell them that what they have done is wrong and they must pay the price. On the other hand, I hope to stop them from getting deeper into crime. If I can stop them from hurting someone in the future, I feel my time is worthwhile.

I know I won’t get through to all of them, but I hope to plant seeds, which may take root someday when they have choices to make. My dream is to save as many as I can.

It is very gratifying when I feel I have gotten through to them and when they thank me. One boy said. “You told me bad things happen for a reason. Your right!” I never would have gotten an education if I hadn’t come to Juvenile Hall. I just got my GED. I applied to a college and was accepted. I will be going to school to be come an engineer when I get out.”

I am happy when I feel I have helped them look at life in a more positive way.

I try to help them turn their mistakes and bad experiences into something good. My greatest success is that I encourage the kids at Juvenile Hall to write letters to save other kids from the consequences they are experiencing. They have written incredible letters. Their letters have great impact on other kids because they come from their peers. My latest book “Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids contain the letters.

Here are inserts from some of the letters:

Addiction controlled my life. Don’t let it control you! I wish for all you guys to be safe, and I pray for you kids that don’t know what life is really about, because after that second when you make the bad decision, it goes down hill from there. Only you can change your future. I hope you all understand that there’s a number in prison with your name on it, if you don’t change. Now’s the time to change. Not later. Not when you get out, but now! If you don’t change now you never will.

Gang banging was my worst thing I ever gotten into. If I could take it back, I would. I repeated my Dad’s cycle.

Now I sit here in a one-room cell, facing 25 years to life. I want you to look around and see what kind of situation you’re in. Open you eyes and your minds and soak as much education as you can. I’m 17 years old in a couple of weeks. I will be graduating from high school (in Juvenile Hall). Education is the key to life.

I’m in the Hall, Unit 800. Why? Because I committed a sin while I was on drugs. At the age of 13, I started using drugs because my best friend was asking me to try some. At the age of 16, my charges are DUI, evading a peace officer, driving at an unsafe speed with no license, a firearm in the car and 187 murder.

All the violence that is going on in our community is not solving nothing. The only thing it’s doing is killing us off, one by one. Before you know it the human race will be extinct. Because we are the last of the dying breed. I’m only telling you this so you guys can make the right decision. Your homies probably say they are down for you, but they be faking, and that’s real. The only people that’s going to stick by you is your mama and your family. I seen too much in my life young homies and it’s not what you are thinking. I lost my little homie and that really hit me. All that was on my mind was retaliation but when I thought about it, I knew it wouldn’t bring him back so I thought of another game plan. I prayed!

Eva, I want to thank you for all the help that you have given me. All the little words you’ve spoken in your groups have helped me so much along the way. I have changed in ways that people wouldn’t believe. I have done a whole 360. Without the help of you, I see the change being 100% more difficult. I wish my family was around to see my new life.

As you can see, my experience with my kids, at Juvenile Hall, has been emotionally rewarding and very satisfying to me. These kids give my life meaning. I feel I am making a difference.

I continue to try to help kids. I have written a book called “BE A WINNER IN LIFE”, which I hope to get into the hands of every child in Juvenile Hall’s, all over the country. Also, I want to get it into the hands of parents. I hope to get to kids before they are locked up.

Yes I’m a grateful to be a senior citizen at Juvenile Hall! I’m grateful my senior years have value and that I am doing something with my time, which is worthwhile.

I now know that every senior citizen can use the wisdom they have gained throughout their life to make a difference. We can all do something. I encourage you to find a way to help a child. Our kids need you!

Eva Fry is an author, singer/songwriter and motivational speaker. She had a ten year volunteer program at Juvenile Hall called “Be a Winner in Life” She has three books “You Must Have a Dream” for seniors, “Be a Winner in Life” for kids, troubled kids and their parents, and Letters from Juvenile Hall, Kids Helping Kids” – for all kinds, especially those who are locked up and to help kids from being locked up. She started writing and songwriting at the age of 60. Her goal is to encourage seniors to reach their potential and help kids do the same. She has many free articles on her web site to help young and old. She has six CD’s which are spiritually based and inspire young and old. She is avilable as a speaker or performer. Her work is available on her web site Eva Fry – eva@evafry.com http://www.evafry.com ( She has many free articles on her web site)

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eva_Fry

TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

 

Terry Murphy, a longtime local businesswoman and community leader who is president of Strategic Solutions and serves as president of Downtown Las Vegas Alliance, is the SHARE Humanitarian for the month of May for her volunteering efforts with Veterans Village, The Rape Crisis Center and the Variety Early Leaning Center Lorenzi Campus.TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

Murphy also serves as Honorary Consul for the Republic of Ireland and as a board member of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts.

 

Each month, SHARE honors those in the community who give without hesitation to help others in need. Murphy was selected for this honor from the more than 1,500 SHARE volunteers in Southern Nevada.

SHARE is involved with raising funds for various social causes including housing assistance and neighborhood support service programs.

 

About SHARE:

SHARE is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1994 by business executives dedicated to providing affordable housing for individuals in need. During its nearly 20 year history, the organization has served hundreds of families, seniors, veterans and those with physical challenges or terminal illnesses. sharelasvegas.org

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About The Rape Crisis Center:

The Rape Crisis Center (RCC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1974 by Florence McClure and Sandra Petta as the Community Action Against Rape (CAAR) with the goal of helping those in Clark County heal from the trauma of sexual violence. Today, The Rape Crisis Center operates a 24/7 crisis hot line for sexual assault victims and provides counseling, advocacy and support to help victims begin the healing process and navigate the legal system. The RCC is also committed to the prevention of sexual assault through educational programs and community outreach. To assist victims to become survivors, the organization depends on a core base of dedicated volunteers and staff. These individuals are empathetic and enthusiastic people who give their time, energy, and personal sacrifice to continue to serve Clark County’s victims of sexual violence. This service is provided through face-to-face and over-the- phone intervention with newly victimized individuals.The Rape Crisis Center hotline number is 888-366-1640.  For more information, visit www.therapecrisiscenter.org.

 

Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Top 100 Blogs On Senior Rights, Elder Law, And Anti-Ageism

At a time when thousands of Baby Boomers are reaching the age of 65 every day, the issues of senior rights, elder laws, and anti-ageism have never been more important, more volatile, or more questioned. After all, this is the generation that was ready to take down the establishment fifty years ago, and they haven’t lost any of their desire to change the world for the better. And, they have the numbers to do it. Here are our 100 top blogs for seniors dealing with senior rights, law & policy, and anti-ageism.

Boomers Against The Law

  1. Elder Law Plus: lawyer Evan H. Farr blogs about topics concerning elder law, including probate strategies and parental care.
  2. Michigan Elder Law Blog: the attorneys at Barsch & Joswick provide seniors and their loved ones with sage advice on a variety of Elder law issues.
  3. Everything Elder Law: Evan Farr is back at it again, this time focusing on Elder Law news, concepts, and innovations from around the country.
  4. Massachusetts Estate and Elder Law Blog: lawyer and blogger Stephanie Konarski gives tips on estate planning and other elder law topics.
  5. New York Elder Law Attorney Blog: your source for elder law news and comment in New York, this blog analyzes nursing home legislation and elder care costs.
  6. Elder Law Prof. Blog: Elder Law professor Kim Dayton authors a really nice blog that covers a wide range of Elder law issues, from Supreme Court cases to seminars.
  7. The Pop Tort: can a consumer advocates blog dealing with civil justice be cute? This blog proves it can, complete with an adorable “Pop Tort” logo, even while exploring such issues as Medicare and Medicaid lawsuits, nursing home scams, and medical malpractice against the elderly, among other legal issues.
  8. Supportive Senior Solutions: this blog from a geriatric care management practice in New York covers issues related to geriatric care, caregiving, and healthcare laws for the elderly and infirm.
  9. Aging Beats the Alternative: elder care specialist Lorie Ebers uses her blog to talk about overcoming the challenges of aging, caring for aging parents, and the less talked about side of elder law: Boomer divorce.
  10. Elder Law Blog: lawyer Ronald C. Morton’s elder law blog is full of sage advice for seniors looking how to tap into Veteran’s benefits, how to plan for their golden years, and more.
  11. The Best Elder Law Blog: published by the attorneys at Lamson & Cutner, this blog discusses elder law cases, the Affordable Care Act, and same-sex marriage.
  12. Elder Law Tips and News: the lawyers at Cooper, Adel & Associates bring you posts on living trusts, aging issues, and general estate planning.
  13. The Connecticut Elder Law Blog: lawyer Michael Keenan provides his readers with estate planning tips, elder fraud, and Medicare rules.
  14. The Teddy Bear Lawyers: attorney Rick Law gives readers a great resource for Elder Law in the Chicagoland area. Find articles on protecting vulnerable seniors and financial planning.
  15. Oregon Elder Law: attorney Orrin Onken blogs on elder law, estate planning, and probate proceedings in plain, easy to understand language.
  16. Florida Elder Law and Estate Blog: this informative blog includes great articles on VA benefits, estate planning, and trusts.
  17. Golden Law Center: written by attorney Sasha Golden, the Golden Law Center blog discusses elder law, special needs planning, guardianship, wills and trusts, and estate administration.
  18. Kraft Elder Law: attorney Robert Kraft blogs about Medicaid, Medicare, wills, trusts, probate, veterans benefits, and other elder law topics.
  19. Pennsylvania Law Blog: this elder law blog by the attorneys at the law offices of Shober & Rock discusses Medicaid, taxes, Veterans, banks, and annuities.
  20. Long Beach Elder Law Blog: this blog focuses on elder abuse, estate protection, the Cal MediConnect program, and reform of health law.
  21. Houston Elder Law Blog: the folks at Wright Abshire Attorneys blog about care planning, estate planning, Medicaid Planning, Probate & Estate Administration, and and Veteran’s Benefits.
  22. Hauptman Law Blog: readers of this blog can learn more about elder, estate, and special needs law. Includes articles on the Medicare Settlement and VA Aid.
  23. Fulkerson Elder Law Blog: the function of this elder law blog is for the firm to respond to common questions clients have about elder law and review developments in the law impacting elder law and estate planning.
  24. CMLP Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog: readers can look forward to reviewing articles on simplifying their estate plan and elder law news items of note.
  25. Massachusetts Estate Planning and Probate Blog: attorney Matthew Karr keeps readers up to date on estate planning and probate news and information.
  26. Marshall Elder and Estate Planning Blog: the author of this elder law blog has over 30 years experience in estate planning, special needs planning, and estates.
  27. Hartford, CT Elder Law Blog: the attorney’s at Ruggiero Ziogas & Allaire discuss estate planning, care planning, Medicaid, Veteran’s Benefits, and Probate.
  28. El Paso Elder Law Blog: the law firm of Stephanie Townsend Allala and Associates blogs on estate planning, guardianships, Medicaid Planning, Nursing Home Abuse, and Trust & Probate.
  29. Miami Probate Law Blog: the folks at the Byrant law firm keep readers up-to-date on estate administration, probate court, estate litigation, and the nuisances of will and trust disputes.
  30. Elder Law News: attorney Brian A. Raphan is based in New York City and specializes in Wills, Estates, Trusts, and Elder Care issues. His blog is full of great resources.
  31. Aging & Law in West Virginia: this blog contains news in law and aging in West Virginia, written by the West Virginia Senior Legal Aid organization.
  32. Florida Elder Law and Estate Planning: this Florida Certified Elder Law attorney provides in depth insights and news to help Floridians protect themselves and preserve their assets.
  33. Family Law Blog Maryland: while this blog looks at all matters pertaining to Family Law, elder law sneaks in as a prevalent theme in many of the cases discussed. They look at legal matters like when divorce and retirement coincide, or when grandparents wish to take custody of their grandchildren.
  34. Phoenix AZ Family Law Blog: looking at issues older couples face in Arizona, this family law blog explores the specific challenges elders face in divorces and custody battles, complete with the latest policy changes and laws.
  35. Otherspoon: hospice volunteer and blogger Ann Neumann talks about care-giving and the realities, politics, and senior rights involved in death and dying.

Seniors Talk Policy And Politics

  1. Aging in Place: this blog is concerned with seniors who are dealing with shrinking benefits and increasing costs—seniors find answers on how to protect themselves.
  2. Estate in Denial: providing news, analysis, and commentary on abusive practices occurring in probate courts. Features original perspective and direct communication.
  3. Florida Estate Planning Lawyer Blog: this blog covers estate planning legal issues, cases of interest, and news with a focus on Florida elder law.
  4. McGuire Woods: the people at McGuire Woods author this great blog on long term care legal issues, including timely news, articles, and white papers.
  5. Illinois Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: published by the law office of Wilson & Wilson, this blog covers asset protection, banking, estate planning, and trusts.
  6. Illinois Nursing Home Abuse Blog: covers Illinois nursing home law, including Supreme Court cases and other information relating to residents and family members.
  7. Law Office of Donald D. Vanarelli Blog: provides readers in New Jersey with information on elder law, estate and special needs planning, and mediation services.
  8. Maryland Nursing Home Lawyer Blog: this blog offers insight on nursing home abuse reports, legislation, and legal opinions of elder law in Maryland.
  9. Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law: elder law attorney Brian Barreira writes on legal issues involving death, taxes, special needs, and long-term elder care.
  10. New Jersey Estate Planning & Elder Law Blog: blog posts explore life and death in New Jersey from a perspective of estate planning, elder law, taxation, probate, and estate administration.
  11. Medina Law Group: postings provide readers with advice on estate planning and management, estate taxes, elder law, and VA benefits.
  12. North Carolina Wills and Trusts: this blog provides readers with estate planning and elder law news with a North Carolina focus.
  13. California Nursing Home Abuse Law Blog: covers nursing home abuse, elder law abuse, and features many quality articles relating to California elder law.
  14. Nursing Home Law Blog: this well written blog discusses elder issues, legislation, legal news, protections of elder rights, and helpful health tips.
  15. PA Elder Estate and Fiduciary Law Blog: focuses on elder law, long-term care, end-of-life and health care surrogate decision-making, and estate planning.
  16. Patti’s Blog: find information about this lawyer’s practice, which concentrates on advocacy for seniors. She shares personal interests and her passions.
  17. Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer Blog: this blog discusses nursing home abuse laws, cases, and news items from Pennsylvania.
  18. Barbara Cashman Blog: Barbara blogs about elder law and policy issues, and often hosts guest bloggers to share their insights on elder law and news.
  19. NJ Elder Law: lawyer Kenneth Vercammen blogs about topics related to estate planning and elder law. He was once awarded the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Practitioner of the Year.
  20. The Senior Sentinel: a blog compiling news and information for Baby Boomers, the Senior Sentinel concentrates on the intersection of ageism and public policy both nationally and world-wide.
  21. Elder Consult: this geriatric medicine blog not only covers Alzheimers, dementia, financial decision making, and medications, it also discusses related legal issues such as elder financial abuse.
  22. Grey Pride: a UK blog by the Anchor Digital Marketing team is dedicated to keeping older people at the top of the political agenda and petitioning the government to create a Minister for Older People to ensure their needs are met.
  23. Over 65 Blog: project organizers from Harvard, Yale, and The Hastings Center host this blog for “seniors seeking solutions for health care and security, mainly looking at health care system reforms, elder law policies and practices, and how seniors can achieve a stronger role in the future of health care.
  24. Reaping Hope Blog: a blog from an NGO in Nepal promoting dignified aging and elder rights, Reaping Hope explores elder abuse and elder oppression while actively helping elderly people claim their rights and challenge discrimination.

Age Against The Machine: Anti-Ageism

  1. Ageist Beauty: the musings, product reviews, and random thoughts of a woman who is fighting against her age.
  2. Everyday Ageism Project: this blog aims to capture people’s everyday experiences dealing with ageism. The author has discovered that ageism is the most commonly experienced form of prejudice.
  3. The Lonely Gerontologist: professor Kelly Yokum blogs about all things aging—including aging stereotypes and other aging topics that come to mind.
  4. My Elder Advocate: this blog provides comprehensive coverage of ageism, the dangers of nursing homes, elder abuse, and elder care.
  5. The Roaming Boomers: David and Carol are great examples of a couple who doesn’t let age get in the way of living life to the fullest.
  6. The Gypsy Nester: Veronica and David show readers how to rock the empty nest and get the most out of life as you age.
  7. Changing Aging: this multi-blog platform challenges conventional views on aging. The authors believe aging is a strength, rich in developmental potential and growth.
  8. The Elders: founded by Nelson Mandela in 2007, the Elders is a group of seniors committed to addressing global challenges, including child marriage and climate change.
  9. Beauty and Wisdom: the blog of photographer Robbie Kaye, who traveled to salons throughout the US to photograph and interview women in their 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s and discovered that beauty is ageless.
  10. Advanced Style: don’t tell these women they are too old to model hip and alluring fashions. This blog teaches women how to dress to impress and that age is only a number.
  11. RL TV: the only cable network and online destination for folks 50+, features a nice blog that provides tips on elder issues and promotes active living.
  12. The 70-Something Blog: blogger Judy informs readers how to live a full and engaging life as she chronicles her journey of aging.
  13. Retirement is Work: newly retired librarian and blogger resolves to post one good thing about retirement every day for a year, but along the way struggles with senior rights and anti-ageism.
  14. Yo Is This Ageist?: a humorous blog by Ashton Applewhite dedicated to determining whether age-related remarks are offensive, “challenging the stereotypes that segregate us by age.”
  15. This Chair Rocks: a smart and sassy blog by Ashton Applewhite that challenges the ideas of ageism with humor and snark. All stereotypes and insensitive remarks are grounds for brilliant blog posts.
  16. Senior Planet: “aging with attitude” is the tagline of this blog community of older adults using technology to connect with each other and take on the issues of ageism and senior rights.
  17. Changing Aging: a blog founded by Dr. Bill Thomas to promote “a radical reinterpretation of longevity” which focuses on anti-ageism and senior rights, as well as getting the most out of a long life.
  18. Time Goes By: Ronni Bennett takes on aging, ageism and related issues with humor, exploring the truth of “what it’s really like to get old.” She starts by rejecting the “cutesy” terms for old people – they’re called “elders” around here!
  19. The Magic of Middle-Aged Women: author Daniel Even Weiss – a man – blogs on the theme of his latest book, The Magic of Middle-Aged Women, where he challenges the prevailing ageist idea that women don’t get better as they age. They do.
  20. Advanced Style: Ari Seth Cohen, a young-ish photographer, roams the New York City streets photographing stylish and creative elders. Here, art challenges the paradigm that age and beauty can’t co-exist.
  21. The New Old Age: the New York Times blog on aging takes advantage of the newspaper’s top writers to explore the unprecedented intergenerational challenge of the Baby Boomers.
  22. The Little Old Lady Stays Put (or doesn’t): explores the “lives, lifestyles and issues of interesting older people,” touching on the issues surrounding ageism, elder rights, living with dementia, and overcoming the struggles of aging with strength and good humor.
  23. Naked at Our Age: advocate of ageless sexuality, Joan Price, talks about sex and aging, taking on Senior Rights subjects like safer sex for seniors while providing helpful tips.
  24. Aging & Work at Boston College: scholars, academics, and researchers share their findings on ageism in the workplace and the challenges aging workers face in this PhD-heavy blog by The Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College.
  25. Ethnic Elders: this newsy blog by New America Media examines the Senior Rights issues and Elder Law of minority groups such as age discrimination, lawsuits related to Social Security, and elder healthcare reform.
  26. The Everyday Ageism Project: blending blogging and research, this site’s goal is to capture the experience of age discrimination. The forum is full of people sharing their experiences in a supportive environment.
  27. Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens Blog: the Huffington Post’s Senior Citizens sub-blog offers wide ranging posts on issues including senior rights and ageism – with its signature left-wing perspective.
  28. Clinical Geriatrics: created as more of a peer-reviewed clinical journal by the American Geriatrics Society, some of the top scholars in geriatrics converge on this blog to discuss geriatric health and wellness issues, which often cross over into legal and anti-ageism issues.
  29. Age Action Alliance: this organization brings together a network of 300 organizations and individuals committed to helping older people. Its blog is dedicated to improving older people’s lives through advocating against ageism, particularly in Britain.
  30. Manitoba Senior Centres: this Canadian blog covers the rampant ageism in Canada and promotes world elder abuse awareness. It also has a list of resources for older adults.
  31. Fierce with Age: defying ageism goes mainstream at this blog, created by veteran journalist Dr. Carol Orsborn. Having written about the Boomer generation for major newspapers and blogged for the Huffington Post and NPR’s Next Avenue, Orsborn is well equipped to take on the spiritual and policy hurdles of aging.
  32. Live Better Boomer!: a Philadelphia-based blog, by social worker Tiffany Matthews, devoted to helping educate and empower Boomers advocate for their own improved healthcare.
  33. Third Age: billed as “health for Boomers and beyond,” Third Age offers relatively fluffy fare, like “Change your Mood with Color,” to the legal issues surrounding Boomer divorce and care-giving.
  34. The Old Gunhand: one facet of senior citizen rights you don’t see every day is elder gun advocates. This website not only tells you the best types of guns for elderly wielders, it also goes into gun policy and senior self-defense.
  35. Age Discrimination Info: a simple name for a one-stop source of statistics and information on age discrimination, including legislation, cases, news, publications, events and training. The perfect resource for the activist.
  36. Age UK: the largest organization in the United Kingdom for working with and for older people, this website has an entire section dedicated to age discrimination and ageism.
  37. National Youth Rights Association: not just for youngsters, the National Youth Rights Association combats ageism in all its forms. In fact, they probably wouldn’t appreciate being called “youngsters.”
  38. Disability and Representation: a blog by writer, photographer and activist Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg that discusses (and tries to change the discourse about) disability rights and ageism, along with autism.
  39. Over 50: Career coaching and workshops for the over-50 crowd, this blog doesn’t stop at finding a job. This site explores Baby Boomer activism in and out of the workplace.
  40. Activist Post: while this blog deals with many topics requiring advocacy, they often include issues that regard Senior Rights, Elder Law and anti-ageism.
  41. California Booming: an informational blog dedicated to California Baby Boomers, this blog covers everything from sex, to diet, to politics of the Boomer generation, including issues concerning senior rights and ageism in the workplace.

Government Grants For Senior Citizens – Specific Grants Set Up For the Elderly by Matthew Salvinger

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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The government has grants set up to help every group of people in the  country, including senior citizens. In some cases these grants may be approved  to the senior citizens themselves, but the grants can also be awarded to people  who assist the citizens on a regular basis. Whether it’s medical research for  the elderly or increasing the safety of old folks homes there are grants that  will provide funding to those who need it.

Government grants for senior citizens will often go to organizations that  work with the elderly and charities that support senior citizen groups. These  organizations can be businesses or volunteer groups, as long as they work with  the elderly in some capacity. The grants can be used for special classes for  people over 65, providing cheaper medical services for the elderly, keeping  volunteer groups that run errands for disabled older adults funded, and just  about anything else an organization can think of to help the elderly  community.

Various websites have provided lists of where to find these government  grants. They have information on what government organization is funding the  grant, when the deadline for the grant application is, what the grant is  intended for, and how to apply for those specific grants. Anyone can apply for  government grants for senior citizens as long as they qualify for the grant. It  tends to be easier for individuals to go through organizations if they are  seeking grant money although individuals are permitted to apply also. Certain  grants for the elderly such as education grants and housing grants are simple to  get without the assistance of an agency. More information on who can apply for  these grants is available through government websites and some local government  agencies.

The US Government and private foundations award MILLIONS IN GRANTS to people just like you who are in need of  financial help. The best part is, most grants come with absolutely NO INTEREST!  Get More  Details

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_Salvinger

Marketing to Senior Citizens – Assume Nothing! by Marte Cliff

May 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Once upon a time, senior citizens were old people. They were assumed to be  suffering from ill health and in need of care. They sold their homes so they  could move in with children or move to a care facility. Not any more.

Now senior citizens exhibit the same variety of health and fitness as  people much younger. In fact, those who have actively taken care of  themselves are probably more fit than those in their teens and 20’s who shun  exercise and live on junk food.

So, assume nothing, because senior citizens come in many varieties,  with many different goals.

Many choose to remain in their homes, while others want a change of scenery.  But even those want to sell have different reasons.

Some want to get away from excessive maintenance chores. They’ll  choose a smaller home with a smaller yard – or perhaps a condo. They may be in  failing health, but don’t assume so. They may just want to pursue hobbies or  take up volunteer work or be free to travel. Many have something they want to do  that they couldn’t do before, and they don’t want to be tied down by a high  maintenance home.

Others want to find a new home with a large yard, or even acreage, so  they can take up gardening or buy a horse or raise dogs.

Some just want to get away! They’ll sell the old homestead and move  into a motor home so they can see the places they’ve been dreaming about for all  those years when they were tied to work.

Some want to move to a more temperate climate – they’re tired of the  cold and snow and want to get outdoors and play all year. Some have always  dreamed of living on a lake or in the mountains or on the desert. Some wanted to  get away to a small town with a slower pace – or to move to a city with opera  houses and art galleries and the theater. But until now, they were stuck because  they were afraid to move away from their work. Now they can go where they  want.

Of course, there still are those seniors who are selling because they do need  to move in with the kids or to an assisted living facility.

Your job as an agent is to not assume anything. If you want  to sort your lists, set up a capture on your website with information about  downsizing to a smaller home, and a separate capture with information about  transitioning to assisted living. You could even have different pages on your  site – just like you might have different pages and different information for  first time buyers and move-up buyers.

When you get a call to list a home for a senior citizen, go with no pre-set  ideas. Wait and talk to the homeowner before you try to anticipate just what  kind of assistance they need. Otherwise, you’ll risk alienating a new client  before you get a chance to show your stuff!

Marte Cliff is a Freelance Copywriter who specializes in writing for real  estate and related industries.

She’ll help you with one letter, or an entire marketing plan. For Real Estate  agents and brokers who are ready to get full value from their websites, she’ll  be happy to put together an entire package – from the web copy to the lead  generation packages that make an agent’s phone ring.

For busy agents on a budget, Marte offers pre-written letter sets for use in  postal mail or in e-mail continuity campaigns. The current selection includes  letters for FSBO’s, Expired Listings, Short Sale sellers, First Time Buyers, and  a set for new agents to send to buyers. Read what’s included in these sets by  visiting http://www.copybymarte.com/pro/prospecting.html

Marte’s weekly ezine for real estate professionals offers tips and hints for  building a successful business. To subscribe, and to see other resources  available for real estate sales professionals, visit her at http://www.copybymarte.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marte_Cliff

 

Ways Senior Citizens Can Keep Young by Charice Louise

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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No one wants to grow old before his or her time. There are some things senior  citizens can do that will keep them looking and feeling younger. Consider these  seven ways seniors can stay young.

Geriatric Massage is one of the best things senior citizens can do for  themselves. The massage of the muscles improves blood circulation by moving  blood cells that may have become trapped in the capillaries. The massage  provides relief for stiff and sore muscles resulting in the person feeling  better. As muscles are released, the individual has more freedom of movement  resulting in an improved posture. Many seniors report fewer problems with  insomnia or other sleep problems after a massage.

Senior citizens soon learn that eating healthy is in their best interest. A  healthy diet provides the needed fiber to keep the individual regular and fight  the discomfort of constipation. Eating healthy food provides the body with  antioxidants to fight disease and can prevent health problems. The senior who  selects healthy foods is more likely to maintain a healthy weight, one of the  keys to living a more active life with fewer health problems.

There is a tendency of some seniors to withdraw into their own homes and  avoid socializing with others. However, you need to socialize in order to stay  young. If you have hobbies that you love, now is the best time in life to  partake in them. Make an effort to remain in touch with friends and family. The  banter of conversations with those outside your own home is necessary to keep  your mental functions sharp.

Exercise has many positive benefits for the senior citizen. In addition to  making the person look younger and fit, exercise can improve flexibility and  increase mobility. A workout releases endorphins, chemicals that help to improve  the overall mood. The person who is in shape is less likely to experience falls,  which can lead to broken bones.

Retirement can be a joyous time; however, it is easy to begin to feel that  your existence on earth is no longer making a difference. Seniors that get  involved stay younger by knowing that their presence matters. Many volunteer  organizations need help. Become a grandma or grandpa volunteer at local schools.  Volunteer at a hospital. Use your time to benefit your church, synagogue or  other house of worship.

Use your brain to keep young. Get a library card and read on a regular basis.  Enroll in a community college course to learn something new. Keep your brain  challenged using crosswords, puzzles and games.

Use meditation to reduce stress on a daily basis. Use relaxing exercises such  as tai chi or yoga (often available at your local Y) to reduce your stress  load.

Massage Envy Spa Valencia, CA is Valencia’s most affordable spa. Visit them  online today at http://www.massageenvy.com/clinics/CA/Valencia.aspx, or visit  their blog at http://expertmassagetherapy.com/valencia/.

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The Benefits of Becoming a Senior Citizen by Rahmat Suki

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Most people hate or dislike the fact that in the years to come, they will be  living the second half of their lives as an old man or as an old woman. Being  old has been stereotyped to becoming ugly, slow, weak and isolated. But this is  not the reality at all times; some people grow old without the comfort of their  loved ones or even the care of other concerned citizens, but most of us have the  privilege to stay with our families and loved ones as we grow older each day.  Aging has its own disadvantages and unpleasant consequences, but there are a lot  of privileges being given to a senior citizen. The benefits that you can derive  from growing old are truly valuable and can help you deal better with aging.

To be considered as a senior citizen, one must reach the age of sixty-five in  the United States or depending on the age stated on the laws of a country. The  age of becoming a senior citizen is also considered as the retirement age for  professionals who have dedicated themselves to their work. Every month, there  are over one million people who turn sixty-five and imagine the fraction of the  population that belongs to this age group. By the time you have reached this  age, you are qualified for numerous benefits exclusive.

In the official context, a senior citizen is a term used for legal and  policy-related causes in verifying individuals who are eligible for specific  benefits to the age group. Some of the benefits of aging include caregivers  resources, consumer protection for seniors, education, jobs, and volunteerism  for seniors, end-of-life issues, federal and state agencies for seniors, health  for seniors, housing for seniors, laws and regulations concerning seniors, money  and taxes for seniors, retirement and travel and recreation for seniors. Even  for those seniors who are raising their own grandchildren have corresponding  benefits for doing so. Becoming old is not entirely full of detriments.

Senior citizen is a responsibility of every community. Every country has  responded to the needs of their graying population and being a senior citizen  means that you have fulfilled your role in your own community.

Do visit [http://www.agingpeople.net] to find out more FREE tips and secrets  of Anti-aging solutions.

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Fill Your Life With Satisfaction – Eight Bonuses For Senior Citizens Activities By Jerry Elrod

April 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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2009 offers opportunities and activities for creating a life satisfying  series of days and moments. A year doesn’t happen all at once, even for senior  citizens who decry how rapidly time flies. The Senior Citizen age is an  everyday, minute at a time process. We surprise ourselves when we discover what  we can do with time. The first goal of a senior citizen is to make every day  productive.

So, here are some early New Year clues for filling life’s days with  satisfaction.

1. Convince yourself that being of Senior Citizen age is a plus. Plan daily  activities that under gird a positive attitude. Read books that enable your  being a positive person, engage in exercise that assists your health and  mobility. Look for one task to do that gives you a sense of accomplishment.

2. Identify one thing that you are exceptionally competent in doing. Do not  limit yourself to the ordinary, but stretch yourself to find something you might  have never considered undertaking: for men, how about knitting or cross  stitching; for women, being able to work on your car.

3. Set a goal of the number of books you will read within a month’s time.  Choose books you always told yourself you wanted to read.

4. Choose one volunteer activity per month that will give you a sense of  community and interactive pride. Find something that allows you to be with  persons whom you don’t normally identify as friends.

5. Work on your spirituality. Note, the word is spirituality, not religion.  Identify with some group, spiritual discipline, devotional exercise which will  enlarge sense of self worth.

6. Study your diet. Work with your spouse or significant other or a dietitian  to be sure you are eating well and assisting your health with healthy meal  planning.

7. If you need more to do, consider an unusual hobby. There are no limits on  solid and available opportunities.

8. Get a good night’s sleep! Recommended sleep is 8 hours per night.  Determine what schedule works best for you. Try not to vary it.

Finally, review your progress in meeting your goals to create a life  satisfying pattern for yourself. Keep a Journal so that you may evaluate your  progress or lack of it. In a few months, you will have created new, healthy  habits and activities which will contribute to your life’s satisfaction as a Senior  Citizen.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

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Benefits Of Joining A Senior Citizens Travel Club by James Redder

April 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Traveling is an interesting way of enjoying and spending time especially for  the senior citizens who are confined to their homes and do not have much of  physical activities. Older members of the family can have a lot of benefits by  taking small and big trips to various places. There are numerous advantages of  senior citizens travel. The best thing to do is to join one of the travel clubs  for seniors in the locality. This will allow you to spend time in useful travel  pursuits.

First, find out about the local clubs in the particular area. Search the  internet or find out from friends and acquaintances about such clubs. Beware of  scams and choose reputable ones. Be very careful and join a senior travel club  that has been there for quite a long time and that has a reputation. The  greatest benefit of joining such travel clubs is discounts on travel. Travel to  various places for a cheaper rate than traveling alone. This is very beneficial  for people who are living on a fixed monthly income and would like to  travel.

Another benefit is that the club can help to plan the trip in a better way.  Many people do not have the time or resources to plan the trip. For such people  this is a very helpful. Most of these clubs have regular meetings for discussing  various things including the travel plans. Be active in the meetings and suggest  various things that are interesting for the group. A good idea can be better  executed when it is shared and planned by a group of people belonging to the  travel club.

Another thing is that many senior citizens are lonely at home. When they  travel with the other members of the club, they can have a wonderful time  socializing with each other and making new friends. They can get rid of their  loneliness and enjoy life in a whole new way. Such clubs also have many  volunteers who take care of the seniors and their needs. So people who are on  their own can be benefited greatly.

Since the senior citizens club volunteers are well-trained, they know about  all the requirements of these people and take them to places that are really  meant for relaxing and enhancing the mood of the seniors. In order to enjoy all  these benefits find the best club from the locality and enroll in it. After  becoming a member it is easy to enjoy the various benefits offered by the senior  citizens travel club.

Next, now you are better informed on Senior Citizens Travel are you ready to get traveling? Read  more information concerning Senior Citizen Travel here.

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Top Senior Citizen Web Sites For Whatever You Need by Maria Norton

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Senior citizen web sites number in the millions and cover nearly every topic  imaginable. Whether you want to find information on benefits, retirement  planning, travel, healthcare, transitioning to another state like Florida, or  even senior citizen sex, there are senior citizen web sites dedicated to the  topic.

One of the most popular sites on the internet for seniors is the  long-recognized American Association of Retired Persons. If you are looking for  any kind of information that is specific to seniors, then their site is an  excellent place to start. The site includes main categories of information like  health, money, leisure, family, and volunteering. You can find information on  discounts available to seniors on travel, dining, and other services. There is  also an online community on the website where you can interact with other  seniors. You can create your own online profile that tells a little about your  and then you can decide what groups you’d like to join based on common interests  and activities.

Or, you can find an incredible amount of information for seniors on the  federal government’s website for senior citizens’ resources at  usa.gov/Topics/Seniors.shtml. The site provides in-depth information and links  to some of the most popular senior citizen web sites on issues like money,  volunteering, health, housing, retirement, end-of-life issues and caregiving.  But the site also includes important information specific to the government such  as:

· Laws and regulations concerning seniors – things like the Age  Discrimination in Employment Act, and the laws relating to Social Security  Administration and Medicare.

· Consumer protection for seniors – information on elder rights, nursing home  advocates, and types of consumer fraud.

· Federal and State agencies for seniors – such as the Veterans’ Health  Administration, the Administration on Aging and the Employee Benefits Security  Administration.

· Information on benefits – the site provides information on disability and  other government benefit programs, as well as a tool to determine if you are  eligible for any benefits.

· Resources specifically for grandparents that are raising their  grandchildren – links to benefits and government assistance information, DHS  programs for Children and Families, and organizations like the National Center  on Grandparents Raising Children

Of course, travel sites are among some of the most popular sites on the web  for seniors. Some of these senior citizen web sites are some of the best for  travel options, both because of their reputation and because of the types of  travel options that they offer:

· Elderhostel is the all-round champ of educational tours for seniors. This  company concentrates on delving into the history and culture of locations in  both the US and abroad.

· ElderTreks – if you want a bit more of an adventure aspect to your travel,  then this company can help. They offer treks that include what they call ‘soft  adventure’ – nothing too extreme.

· Grand Circle Travel – this is a tour operating company that offers trips to  all age groups, but that definitely caters to seniors.

· Seniors at Sea – as you can probably tell from the title, this travel  company offers cruises designed with the senior in mind.

· Grand Travel – this unique travel company offers packages for grandparents  and grandchildren to enjoy together.

There is simply no end to senior citizen web sites and the range of topics  they cover. No matter what kind of information you’re seeking, you can find it  with a bit of patience and an internet connection.

Maria Norton is the creator of florida-retirement.net, a website designed for  those who are considering retiring to Florida or buying second homes there. She  is a licensed real estate broker and a 20 year veteran of the Relocation  Industry. She provides comprehensive, personalized & free, Florida  Relocation Services. She has also published 4 eBooks: A Guide to Establishing  Florida Residency, How to Create the Perfect Retirement, The Florida Beach Book & How to Buy a Second/Vacation Home in Florida, which are available on the  website. To get your copy of How To Create the Perfect Retirement visit her  website at http://www.florida-retirement.net.

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Crafts For the Elderly Can Be Fun Gift Ideas For Senior Citizens By Diane Carbo

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Combing crafts for the elderly, as a family project, can create fun  gift ideas for senior citizens. Developing an ongoing family  project will allow the aging senior to experience a new activity and relieve  boredom and stress.

Spending time with your aging senior is probably the most precious gift you  can give them. Here are a few ideas that would make great gifts and also have  the benefit of getting to know each other on a more intimate level.

Consider asking your senior citizen to get out all the old photos and  important mementos that they have saved over the years. It may be old letters,  special cards, things that have some significance or meaning to them. The senior  citizen may want to ask extended family members to do the same.

Ask  them to take the pictures and start a journal. Write down what they  remember about the individuals in the pictures, maybe it will spark a memory of  a time long forgotten. If you have a senior that has difficulty writing, get  them a recorder to tape the information. You may ask if they would be interested  in taking a creative writing class there they can learn how to write about their  life or their memories. You can then take their writing and create a special  bound book for them.

If you have a senior that has started with mental decline, you may be  surprised how much they will be able to share about the past, even if they  cannot remember what they had for breakfast.

Everyone wants to feel as of they have made a small difference in the lives  of their loved ones. Showing interest in their past will spark fond memories and  create a wealth of knowledge for your future generations.

More Crafts for the Elderly are Some Fun Gift Ideas for Senior  Citizens…

There are several opportunities you can use the photos, the journal and the  sparked memories. Depending on your interest and commitment level and the  abilities of the senior citizen there are many avenues you can take with all  this new found information.

For example, The National Public Radio has established a nonprofit  organization, called StoryCorps®. This project is one of the largest oral  history projects of its kind. This was a system developed just for those who  wish to record and save stories from their lives. Each conversation is recorded  on a free CD to share with others and your story is preserved at the Library of  Congress. The best part is, it is free! The senior citizens in your life will be  excited and honored to preserve some of their history for future  generations.

Consider creating a photo family tree for the senior citizen. Is the aging  senior interested in genealogy? Do they have an old family bible or written  history of past generations? If not, consider starting a genealogy project and  use some of the pictures to create a photo family tree. Of course some of this  research can be done online. The USGenWeb Project is run by volunteers to assure  that there is free genealogy websites for genealogical research in every county  and every state of the United  States. This Project is non-commercial and fully  committed to free genealogy access for everyone. It is a great way to spend time  with the senior in your life and learn about the past family history.

Another project you may use with all the pictures is to purchase a portable  DVD player, one that can play DVD+R/RW. Then take the photos and scan them to  make them digital photographs. Turn the pictures into a slide show, with  captions, titles or even audio of the pictures. Burn the pictures into a  DVD.

It is important that you provide step by step instructions, in large print,  on how to use the DVD player for the technologically challenged senior  citizen.

Scrapbooking is another alternative for utilizing and preserving the pictures  and other mementos. This a is   project that will give the senior citizen in  your life the opportunity to create their story about their life with their  personal touch. You can provide the supplies and classes so that they can learn  this new found activity.

No matter what avenue you take in providing crafts for the elderly make them fun. You can get creative with gift ideas for senior citizens,  but don’t forget to make it special and meaningful. When the project is done,  don’t forget, no mater how old one gets to be, there is still joy and excitement  in opening a present. Celebrate the finished project with a party or  “unveiling.” And don’t forget to wrap the finished project!

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. That decision  may be made when you are 20, 30, 40 or in fact at any age, with sooner rather  than later being ideal. Diane has developed a web site to make people aware of  issues and options. You will find extensive helpful information that will be  continually updated. Please visit Diane’s web site and learn more about good gift-ideas-for-senior-citizens Sign up for “The Caring  Advocate” her free newlsetter and take advantage of a complimentary e-course Advocating  For Yourself and Others

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Healthy Eating, Exercise and Lifestyle Guide For Senior Citizens By David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

While it is important for people of all ages to stay healthy, it is especially important for senior citizens to maintain healthy eating habits as well as to stay active which is important in the prevention of chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. By practicing healthier living practices, senior citizens can maintain a healthy weight, avoid depression, and stay mentally sharp. Those participating in caring for the elderly should be aware of these healthy living practices and work to both encourage and facilitate them.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a healthy diet includes many different types of food that are rich in nutrients. They have outlined specifically what this eating plan entails at the website.. Because this eating plan is designed specifically for senior citizens, it focuses on the types of foods that are important for preventing common ailments of older Americans like obesity and serious chronic illnesses.

Healthy Eating 101:

By following some of the tips listed, senior citizens can start a healthier lifestyle today:

  • Don’t skip meals. It is important to eat regularly in order to maintain normal metabolism and not become tempted to eat higher fat foods when food is consumed.
  • Eat a diet that is high in fiber. By eating foods like whole-grain breads, beans, vegetables, and fruits, you can lower your susceptibility to diabetes and heart disease.
  • Senior citizens especially should begin to adjust their diet to one that includes less calories and fat because the body will need less as it ages.
  • Calcium and Vitamin D are very important for nutrition and keeping bones strong. You can get this by either getting in at least three servings of dairy every day, or substituting these with soy-based beverages and proteins.
  • Senior citizens will have a harder time absorbing adequate amounts of the B12 vitamin. For this reason, it is important to eat cereals fortified with this nutrient or taking vitamin B12 supplements with meals.
  • Snack the smart way. Senior citizens will want to limit the amount of unhealthy snacking they do which involves foods high in calories and sugars. Instead, keep small portions of dried fruit, peanut butter, or crackers at hand to keep the appetite under control while remaining healthy.
  • Drink plenty of water. Although senior citizens often feel less thirsty then they used to, it is important to stay hydrated by either drinking water or water-based beverages like tea, coffee, soup, and skim milk.

Planning and Preparing Meals

 

Sometimes people find it hard to eat healthily because eating is often a social event which involves many people with different eating preferences and goals. While it is important to be able to enjoy a meal with family and friends, it is also important to maintain your own eating integrity by making sure everyone is on board with your personal healthy eating goals. Friends and family, as well as those providing elder care should facilitate healthy eating, not detour from it. The following tips address ways that senior citizens can maintain the healthy eating habits without sacrificing the social aspect of sharing a meal with others or learning to adjust to a lifestyle that involves eating with less people on a day-to-day basis.

  • Grocery shopping with others. This can be a fun and smart way to control the cost and quantity of food that you consume. If you don’t live with many people, this is a good way to split large-quantity items like potatoes and eggs which you may not be ableto use before expiration.
  • A time saving a smart way to eat healthy is cooking large quantities of food ahead of time and portioning for heating on later dates.
  • A quick way to prepare meals for yourself or for guests involves keeping frozen or canned fruits and vegetables on hand. Draining and/or rinsing canned foods is a good way to lower sodium or calories in foods that are kept in high sugar or high salt fluids.
  • Eating or preparing a meal shouldn’t always be a chore. Trying new recipes or eating outside can be a fun new twist on a meal with someone special.
  • Try to eat with people you enjoy to be around.
  • Some senior citizens have difficulty preparing meals, which is why it is important to become informed about home health care agencies or eldercare facilities that can aid in providing meals. The Eldercare Locator number is 1-800-677-1116.

Loss of Appetite or Desire to Eat

 

There are various reasons for why some senior citizens may not eat as well as they should or lose the desire to eat completely.

If you find that it is difficult to eat well, then it is best to speak with a healthcare provider or someone involved in your elder care about what can be done to help you eat better.

Some senior citizens are unable to eat well due to issues involving the condition of their teeth or issues with dentures. Checking with a dentist about physical pain that occurs when eating or other issues can help with these issues that lead to poorer eating habits.

When senior citizens lose family and friends or become depressed about events in their life, they may lose the desire to eat. In these instances, it is of the utmost importance that these individuals seek help from people they trust like their family, friends, church community, or those assisting with their elder care that will happily help them in finding ways to continue a healthy lifestyle and eating plan.

Some senior citizens complain that the flavor of foods change when they begin to take certain medications. While it is best to consult with a physician about issues surrounding medication, people can also take vitamin supplements with food that will help them stay healthy.

If you have someone who assists with your in home care, ask them to be vigilant about helping you eat healthy. Have them remind you to eat, and ask them to lend you a hand in preparing meals that are good for you.

Healthy Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for being able to function in day-to-day life as well as stay mentally sharp. Senior citizens often lose or gain weigh as they age. If you are unsure about what weight you should maintain, consult your physician.

Health Risks Associated with Being Underweight

  • poor memory
  • compromised immunity
  • osteoporosis (weak bones)
  • decreases strength
  • hypothermia (lowered body temperature)
  • constipation

Health Risks Associated with Being Overweight

  • type 2 diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • heart disease
  • stroke (lack of oxygen transported to the brain)
  • some cancers
  • gallbladder disease

 

Because healthy weights will differ for everyone, it is important to verify with a physician whether it is healthy for you personally to lose or gain weight.

Staying Active

Participating in regular healthy amounts of physical activity can not only make you feel better, but it can make you less prone to diabetes, heart disease, and colon cancer. Staying active can be difficult for senior citizens, still it is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.

The following are some tips for maintaining a lifestyle that incorporates physical activity:

  • Know what amount of physical activity is appropriate for you. Everyone has different levels of activity that is safe for them, and while remaining active is important, always consult a health care provider about what is right for your lifestyle.
  • Take time to warm up, cool down, or take breaks when participating in a session of increased physical activity.
  • Take it slow. Always start slowly and build up to more intense levels of physical activities.
  • If you experience any pain, dizziness, or shortness of breath during exercise, stop the activity immediately.
  • Drink water.
  • Dress appropriately if you decide to exercise outdoors. Wear warmer clothes during the winter and wear lighter clothes during the summer while applying sunscreen or wearing sunglasses.
  • Wear the correct shoes for the activities that you participate in.

Types of Activity

 

Aerobic activities include activities that increase the heart rate and work the larger muscle groups. You may be able to speak a few words, but would not be able to carry on an entire conversation due to breathing patterns. Some examples of aerobics include:

  • brisk walking
  • water aerobics
  • tennis
  • house work
  • active play with children or pets
  • dancing

 

Begin incorporating small periods of this activity into your schedule during the week while slowly increasing the duration and frequency as time progresses. It is also important to incorporate different types of exercise that focus on balance and flexibility. Becoming used to a lifestyle with regular patterns of aerobic activity can reduce the effects of aging, control weight, lower risk of heart disease, improve flexibility, increase mood and energy, and expand social networks by meeting new people while doing various activities.

Strengthening activities involve the use of muscle groups against resistant forces like when lifting weights or doing yard work that involves lifting, digging, or pushing a lawn mower. This type of activity can keep muscles strong, reduce the need for a cane, reduce risk of bone injury, and help maintain a healthy weight.

Balance activities focus on muscles in specific areas of the body that encourage control as you move through space, reducing the likelihood of falls. This kind of activity could include walking heel to toe, standing on one foot, getting out of a sitting position without the use of the hands, and standing on the tip of your toes. Balance activities can help you stay steady on your feet and reduce the risk of fall and subsequent injury.

Flexibility activities increase the length of the muscles and can include stretching, yoga, and popular exercise programs like pilates. These activities can maintain the felxibility of joints, prevent stiffness, prevent injuries, and lower stress levels in general.

Weight-bearing activities require the muscles to work against gravity where the arms or legs bear the weight of the body. Activities like walking, tennis, and climbing stairs can build and maintain bone mass or reduce the risk of bone fractures.

Some activities incorporate multiple types of strengthening addressed above. What is important is that senior citizens find an enjoyable and do-able activity that will help them incorporate as many benefits as possible which will have far-reaching benefits to their health.

It’s Easy to Stay Healthy

A common misconception is that it takes an excessive amount of time and extra energy to maintain a healthy lifestyle. However, by just taking short walks for ten minutes a time or cleaning the house regularly can be practical ways to incorporate different physical activities into your daily schedule. And remember, staying healthy as a senior citizen will have increasing benefits as you continue to age.

Staying Motivated to Take Care of Yourself

Just because we age doesn’t mean that we are any less stressed by occurrences in life that may make us feel bad about ourselves or decrease our motivation to be good to ourselves. If anything, many of the challenges senior citizens face add stress.  Losing loved ones and friends or having trouble being independent with the added stressed of disease and functioning due to aging can cause depression or lifestyle changes that contribute to bad health. Here are some important tips for being good to yourself when you may not feel motivated due to circumstances out of your control:

  • Get plenty of sleep
  • Stay connected with family and friends
  • Join clubs or other social groups that you enjoy
  • Spend time with people that you enjoy
  • Volunteer at organizations in your community
  • Work a part-time job that isn’t too stressful or demanding
  • Watch a funny movie or find a way to laugh
  • Take up a hobby that you enjoy

 

Most importantly, senior citizens should remember that it is relatively easy and worth-while to maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. Be sure to keep family, friends, and those involved in your elder care informed of your goals as they can help assist you. And remembering to eat healthy meals regularly, getting in physical activity, getting enough sleep, and being good to yourself are critical for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Benefit Rocks Out for Homeless Canines

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Benefit Rocks Out for Homeless Canines

Strap on your guitar, put on your best dancing shoes and get ready to rock and roll for a good cause: helping the plight of homeless animals.

The local nonprofit organization called A Home 4 Sport will be holding a “Rockin’ Out for Canines” fund-raiser on Saturday, April 27 from 7 – 10 p.m. at Tommy Rocker’s. Tommy Rocker’s is located at 4275 Dean Martin Dr.

Entertainment will be supplied by Las Vegas’ own School of Rock. A raffle for prizes and a silent auction will also be part of the fun.

The event is open to those at least 21 years of age. Tickets will cost $15 online at ahome4spot.com or $20 at the door. Food and drink is included in the admission price.

All proceeds will benefit a local organization called A Home 4 Spot. The volunteer organization provides foster care and medicine while seeking permanent homes for abandoned dogs.

A Home 4 Spot began operations in March 2009. Since that time, the 501(c )(3) nonprofit organization has saved over 500 local dogs from being euthanized. Since the beginning of 2012, the organization has raised more than $53,000 for the medical treatment of animals that would otherwise be killed.  For more information, please contact ahome4spot@gmail.com or call 702.239.7986.

AARP: George Davis Appointed AARP State President

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

George Davis Appointed AARP State President

African-American Business Executive is Top Advocate for AARP’s 3.1 million members California

PASADENA, Calif., April 3, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — George Davis of Los Angeles, CA, has been appointed AARP California State President. Prior
to his appointment, Davis was acting state president and served for two
years on the state’s Executive Council, a five-member council that provides
direction and leadership in carrying out AARP’s strategic priorities in
California.

Davis came to AARP as a distinguished executive in the broadcasting and
entertainment industry.  He is currently Principal of Davis Broadband Group, a Culver City based consulting firm that advises media and entertainment
companies on digital content distribution.  Earlier in his career, Davis was
managing television technical operations in the US and Asia at Technicolor
and Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Throughout his career, Davis has been actively involved in
community and public service.  In 1999, he was appointed by Governor Pete
Wilson to the board of the California African American Museum.  A few years
later Davis was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to represent the
public as a member of the Board of Governors of the California State Bar.  He
is also a board member of New Directions, a nonprofit organization that helps
homeless veterans.

As volunteer state president, Davis will lead the California Executive Council and work in partnership with State Director Katie Hirning and in collaboration with other volunteers and staff to achieve AARP’s strategic priorities in the state.

“We are thrilled to have George as our new state president,” said State Director Katie Hirning. “He’s a long-time advocate for small businesses and a strong supporter of
technology and outreach to diverse populations.  His knowledge and experience
in these areas will greatly benefit AARP’s more than 3 million California
members.”

Davis is an avid hiker and enjoys collecting rare books when traveling abroad.  He resides in Los Angeles and has two adult daughters and a son attending college.

AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people turn their goals and dreams into real possibilities, strengthens communities and fights for the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare,
employment security and retirement planning. We advocate for consumers in the
marketplace by selecting products and services of high quality and value to carry the AARP name as well as help our members obtain discounts on a wide range of products, travel, and services.  A trusted source for lifestyle tips, news and educational information, AARP produces AARP The Magazine, the world’s largestcirculation magazine; AARP Bulletin; www.aarp.org

AARP TV & Radio; AARP Books; and AARP en Espanol, a bilingual news source.  AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to political campaigns or candidates.  The AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older persons in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. AARP has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of
Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Learn more at www.aarp.org

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Nevada Honors Impact of AmeriCorps during AmeriCorps Week

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

[RENO/LAS VEGAS] — Nevada is taking part in AmeriCorps Week, March 9-17, a national celebration to recognize the vital work done by AmeriCorps members in communities across the nation and in Nevada since the national service program began 19 years ago.

 

“We are proud of and grateful to the AmeriCorps members who are getting things done in Nevada communities,” said Shawn Lecker-Pomaville, CEO of Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service which distributes approximately 2 million dollars in federal funding and is the state authority on volunteering. Believing that AmeriCorps is a powerful pathway to career opportunities, Nevada Volunteers wanted to record testimonies directly from AmeriCorps members.  The video, “Everyone Can Serve,” highlights the benefits of AmeriCorps and how to get involved. To view the video, click here.

 

“It’s pretty humbling when you’re doing work that is bigger than yourself.  You’re having a greater impact and you realize just how small we are but how big of an impact we can have in our natural world,” said Nic Brancato, Nevada Conservation AmeriCorps member through the Great Basin Institute.

 

Governor Brian Sandoval joined Nevada Volunteers in recognizing AmeriCorps Week by proclaiming March 9-17 AmeriCorps Week in Nevada. To view the Governor’s proclamation, click here.

 

AmeriCorps members typically remain actively engaged in their communities long after their service is complete. An AmeriCorps longitudinal study found that AmeriCorps alums are more attached to their communities, aware of community challenges, and significantly more likely to go into public service careers.

 

To find out more about AmeriCorps in Nevada visit www.nevadavolunteers.org.

Veterans Village Las Vegas Receives $97,000 in Mattresses

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The Home Depot continues to support Veterans Village Las Vegas

 

The Home Depot Foundation (THDF) recently donated a truckload of mattresses valued at more than $97,000 to Veterans Village Las Vegas.  The Home Depot Foundation, which has been actively engaged in supporting VeteransVillage since its inception last year, continues to increase its support to help complete a comprehensive renovation of VeteransVillage’s physical facility, a former Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms.   Just last month, The Home Depot Foundation awarded VeteransVillage with a $600,000 grant – the largest grant to a single project and the largest grant in THDF’s western division.

“The miracle on the strip continues,” said Arnold Stalk, founder, Veterans Village Las Vegas.  “The Home Depot Foundation’s ongoing support allows us to give veterans a safe and comfortable place to stay. We are grateful and appreciative for all they have done and marvel at their ongoing support via unexpected donations like a truckload of mattresses.  The good folks at The Home Depot Foundation are true angels.”

 

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

 

The mattresses were donated through THDF’s partner, Good360 – a nonprofit that helps companies efficiently donate slow-moving, obsolete and seasonal inventory to charitable organizations. In 2012, the Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy recognized Good360 and THDF with an Excellence Award for its exemplary partnership.

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org.

 

About The Home Depot Foundation:

The Home Depot Foundation is dedicated to improving the homes of U.S. military veterans through financial and volunteer resources to help nonprofit organizations. The Foundation has committed $80 million to these efforts over five years.  Through Team Depot, the company’s associate-led volunteer program, thousands of Home Depot associates volunteer their time and talents to positively transform neighborhoods and perform basic repairs and modifications to homes and facilities serving veterans with critical housing needs. Since its formation in 2002, The Home Depot Foundation has granted more than $340 million to nonprofit organizations improving homes and lives in local communities. To learn more and see our associates in action, visit www.homedepotfoundation.org.

Veterans Village Collaborates with Heaven Can Wait Animal Society

March 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Veterans to pilot dog adoption program 

 

WHAT:                 VeteransVillageLas Vegas, a comprehensive housing and resource facility for U.S. veterans and their families, is collaborating with Heaven Can Wait Animal Society (HCWAS) Las Vegas.  Two veterans will pilot a dog adoption program by volunteering to assume responsibility for the care of a dog while staying at the facility.  When they leave, veterans can opt to adopt the dog permanently at no charge.  The plan is to expand the program so that more veterans will enjoy the opportunity to have a loving companion, while helping to save dogs’ lives by giving them a safe home at VeteransVillage.

 

WHEN:                 Two veterans will officially adopt their dogs on Thursday, March 14 at 10 a.m.

Other dogs will be onsite to meet potential veteran owners to be considered for future adoption.

 

WHERE:               Veterans Village Las Vegas, 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard South

 

DETAILS:              Veterans are responsible for keeping their dog active, grooming, ensuring the dog is fed and, crated when left alone. HCWAS will properly train the dogs, provide food, treats and toys as well as assume financial responsibility for all veterinarian visits.  HCWAS will also train veteran residents how to properly care for their animal.

 

HCWAS offers many other services for animals in the Las Vegas area. In addition to finding safe homes for animals, HCWAS focuses its attention on eliminating companion animal suffering and pet overpopulation through spay/neuter, adoptions, community outreach programs and education. By pairing with Veteran’s Village, HCWAS hopes to reach its projected goals of better educating adults on the importance of spay/neuter for their pet and eliminating the killing of more than 30,000 cats and dogs annually in Las Vegas.

 

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About Heaven Can Wait Animal Society

Heaven Can Wait Animal Society, a non-profit 501 (c)(3) animal humane organization, was formed in 2000 by a group of 5 concerned citizens with the idea of building a beautiful 20 acre sanctuary to house all of the unwanted animals in our community.  In the meantime, though, animals were and still are dying at rate of around 30,000 per year in our local shelters with even more just dying in the streets.  Therefore, we decided to refocus our efforts slightly away from rescue and more toward promoting spay/neuter as the solution to the tragic pet overpopulation problem here in Las Vegas.www.hcws.org

City Of Las Vegas April 2013 Senior Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

 

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, through April 12, by appointment only.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Low-income residents can get free assistance in preparing their personal income tax forms.  Some restrictions apply; call 229-6454 for details and appointment.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, through April 11 by appointment only.
Free with appointment only.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesday afternoons, through April 9.
Free with appointment only.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1600 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesdays, through April 9, by appointment only.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern, (702) 229-1515

Income restrictions apply.  Call 229-1515 for information and to make an appointment.

 

VITA Free Tax Form Preparation

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., through April 11, by appointment only.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program is an Internal Revenue Service program designed to help low- and moderate-income taxpayers complete their annual tax returns at no cost. All ages with income under $49,000 are welcome. Call 229-6125 for appointments.

Senior Idol Auditions (ages 50+)

Application packets available April 1-26.

Auditions May 8-9, by appointment only.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Residents interested in performing during the annual Senior Idol Talent Show are invited to complete an audition application packet. Singers, dancers, comedians, magicians, and musicians, both individuals and groups, are encouraged to apply. All performers must be at least 50 years old. Application packets will be available April 1 at the Las VegasSeniorCenter, and are due no later than April 26. Auditions will be selected from completed applications; applicants will be given an appointment May 8 or 9 at the Las VegasSeniorCenter. The show will be performed Thursday, June 13. Tickets go on sale May 1. Call 229-6454 for information and application packets!

 

Centennial Hills Active Adult Book Club (ages 50+)
First Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m.; April 3.

Cost: Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Come prepared to discuss this month’s book.

April’s book: “The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein.

May’s book: “Defending Jacob” by William Landay.

Hop into Spring Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, April 4, 10 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 29.
Cost: $3.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Start this spring off right with a sp-egg-tacular breakfast! Hop on over April 4! Registration opens March 1.

 

Scrapbooking and Card Making (ages 50+)

Monday, April 8, 1 to 4 p.m.  (second Monday of each month)
Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Bring a project you’re currently working on and share/receive crafting ideas. Registration opens March 18. Call 229-1702 for more information.

 

Root Beer Float Day (ages 50+)

Tuesday, April 9, 10 a.m. Register by April 2. Space is limited.

Cost: $1.

DoolittleSeniorCenter, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Have a tasty root beer float while enjoying good conversation.

 

International Guitar Month Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, April 17, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration is required by April 12.
Cost: $5.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy lovely guitar music while you dine during the International Guitar Month Luncheon.  Registration opens March 1.

Picnic at the Garden (ages 50+)

Wednesday, April 17, noon. Register at DoolittleSeniorCenter by April 10. Space is limited.

Cost: $3.

DoolittleCommunityGarden, 1200 block of Blankenship Ave., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy grilled burgers and hot dogs, feast on delightful side dishes and desserts, enjoy the scenery and catch up on all the fruits and vegetables grown in our community garden.

 

AARP Defensive Driving (ages 50+)

Thursday, April 18, 11 a.m.

Cost: $12 AARP member/$14 non-members AARP; plus $2 senior programs membership.

LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Bring snacks and drinks to enjoy while you take this defensive driving course to improve your skills!

 

Red Hat Rally (ages 50+)

Thursday, April 25, 11:30 a.m. Register by April 19. Registration opens March 1.

Cost: $10, plus current senior programs membership.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Calling all Red Hatters!  Join the city of Las Vegas and the Purple Passions Red Hat group from the Las VegasSeniorCenter for a luncheon and entertainment to celebrate you.  Door prizes will be awarded. Space is limited, so register early!

 

Seniors Helping Seniors (ages 50+)

Monday, April 29, 1:30 p.m. Register by April 25.

Free admission.

LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Learn about energy-saving programs coordinated by Southwest Gas.

Nevada Volunteers to Present over $600,000 to Legislature

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service, will present the Nevada Legislature in Carson City on February 28, 2013 at 9:45 a.m., a check of $679,276.  Nevada Volunteers distributes the AmeriCorps*State funding allocated to Nevada from Congress and is the state authority on volunteer information.

 

“This check represents the value of AmeriCorps members and all the volunteers they recruited last year to address unmet needs throughout Nevada” said Shawn Lecker-Pomaville, CEO of Nevada Volunteers.  “By providing the modest state match to this federal funding and investing in service as a strategy to solve problems, Nevada’s leaders saved the state $679,276.”

 

AmeriCorps*State is a cost-effective program that provides direct, results-driven services in the areas of education, human services, public safety and the environment.  AmeriCorps service gives individuals an avenue to help their communities while gaining real world experience and  earning an education award. During the grant year of 2011-2012 alone, 308 AmeriCorps members served 259,930 hours and recruited an additional 3,579 volunteers.  This impact in Nevada communities continues to multiply each year.

 

Upon completion of a member’s term of service, he or she is offered an education award  equal to the Pell Grant, which  can be used to pay for college, graduate school, vocational training, purchase educational supplies, or to repay student loans.  Those 55 and older during their time of service, can transfer their Educational Award to children, grandchildren or foster children.

Top Five Tips To Save Your Vision: EyeCare America Encourages Prevention and Early Detection

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Many people take their vision for granted, but what if you lost your peripheral vision, developed a black spot in the center of your visual field, or even went blind altogether?  For more than 4.2 million Americans living with serious vision loss or blindness,  these and other vision challenges can make it difficult to enjoy life’s simple pleasures such as reading, playing cards, or watching grandchildren grow. Vision loss can also make it difficult to live independently, work, or drive. That’s why it is so important to prevent eye disease and vision loss whenever possible.

Often, preventive care and lifestyle choices can help keep your vision healthy. Ophthalmologists – eye physicians and surgeons – encourage seniors to follow these top five tips to safeguard vision:

  1. Get an eye exam. To protect healthy vision, seniors age 65 and older should have a dilated eye exam every 1-2 years, or as recommended by their ophthalmologist. Visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for an eye exam at no out-of-pocket cost with one of EyeCare America’s volunteer ophthalmologists.
  2. Know your family history. Eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma can run in families, so it’s important to know your family’s history of eye disease and talk to your ophthalmologist about any possible genetic risk factors.
  3. Don’t smoke. Tobacco smoking is directly linked to many adverse health effects, including cataracts and AMD. Studies show that current smokers and ex-smokers are more likely to develop AMD than people who have never smoked.
  4. Eat right. A variety of vegetables, especially leafy green ones, are an important part of an eye-healthy diet. Researchers have found people on diets with higher levels of vitamins C and E, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA are less likely to develop early and advanced AMD. For delicious recipes that incorporate these essential nutrients, EyeCare America offers a free, downloadable cookbook, called Feast Your Eyes on This.
  5. Protect your eyes from injuries. An estimated 2.5 million eye injuries occur in the U.S. each year, so it is critical to wear proper eye protection to prevent eye injuries, especially during home projects like gardening and cleaning. Eye injuries can also be prevented by securing loose rugs, railings, or other hazards that could cause falls or slips.

Seniors age 65 and older are at the greatest risk for eye disease and vision loss, and because diseases like AMD and glaucoma often have no early symptoms, comprehensive eye exams are especially important. EyeCare America provides care at no out-of-pocket cost to seniors age 65 and older through its corps of volunteer ophthalmologists across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

EyeCare America is designed for people who:

  • Are U.S. citizens or legal residents;
  • Are age 65 and older;
  • Have not seen an ophthalmologist in three or more years; and,
  • Do not receive eye care through an HMO or the VA.

To see if you or a loved one age 65 or older is eligible, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc., with additional support provided by Alcon. The program is endorsed by state and subspecialty ophthalmological societies.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people.  More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Fashion Show Salutes Youth Volunteers For Exceptional Community Service

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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More than 30 high school young men and women from National Charity League Las Vegas and

Young Men’s Service League take the runway at Fashion Show

 

WHAT:                        In recognition of thousands of hours of community service performed by local youth, Fashion Show hosts a special runway show to salute and recognize the good works and community contributions of two local youth service organizations – National Charity League (NCL) Las Vegas chapter and Young Men’s Service League (YMSL).  More than 30 young men and women from area high schools and members of these organizations will participate in a special runway show underwritten and hosted by Fashion Show, Best Agency and Faiss Foley Warren Public Relations.   The young women and men, along with their mothers, are members of the National Charity League and Young Men’s Service League Las Vegas chapters, respectively, and have collectively performed thousands of hours of community service at dozens of non-profit organizations in our community.  NCL’s mission is to promote volunteerism, cultivate leadership and provide an opportunity for mothers and teen daughters to forge a bond through service.  YMSL encourages young men and their mothers to improve their relationship by pursuing philanthropic opportunities in their community.

 

The show is free to the public with special reserved seating for NCL and YMSL members.

 

WHEN:                       Saturday, February 23, 2013

Runway shows at 1 and 3 p.m.  

 

WHERE:                    On the runway in the Great Hall

Fashion Show, 3200 Las Vegas Boulevard South

 

FASHION SHOW:    

Fashion Show is the largest shopping destination on Las Vegas Boulevard.  It is located at 3200 Las Vegas Blvd., South and can be accessed from Spring Mountain Road, just west of Las Vegas Boulevard or via Mel Torme Way, just off of Industrial Road.  Anchors include Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue, Macy’s, Dillard’s, Bloomingdale’s Home, Nordstrom and Forever 21.  Underground, covered, garage and valet parking are offered. Please call Fashion Show at 702-369-8382, or visit www.thefashionshow.com for more information.

 

NATIONAL CHARITY LEAGUE:

Established in Los Angeles, California in 1925, and incorporated in 1958, National Charity League, Inc. is the premier mother-daughter organization, serving women and their daughters in grades 7-12. The NCL Experience inspires and empowers women to succeed as confident, well-rounded and socially aware contributors in their communities.  Currently the membership organization has 168 Chapters in 17 states, providing valuable philanthropic, leadership, and cultural experiences to its members and striving to meet critical needs of local communities through hands-on volunteer support. For more information, visit our Website at www.nationalcharityleague.org.

 

YOUNG MEN’S SERVICE LEAGUE:

Founded in Plano, Texas in 2001 by Pam and Julie Rosener, Young Men’s Service League is an organization that allows mothers and their high school sons an opportunity to work together in support of those in need within the community.  The National YMSL organization was formed in 2005 and has grown to over 30 chapters in five states.  In addition to volunteering and completing service hours, the young men are required to attend meetings where they develop leadership, social and life/practice skills as well as learn about health/nutrition and making smart decisions in life.

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Senior Events

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City Of Las Vegas March 2013 Senior Events

Las Vegas Residents Invited To Celebrations, Luncheons & Activities At City Centers

 

The city of Las Vegas active adult and senior centers offer exercise, fitness, craft, arts, dance, music and computer classes; cards; games; discussion and social groups; luncheons; sports; and special events Monday through Friday to residents age 50 and better. Many of these activities contribute to wellness and a healthy lifestyle. A listing of classes and activities is published in the Beyond the Neon Leisure Guide, available in the centers and online at www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. All activities are subject to change. Most activities require $2 annual membership to city of Las Vegas Senior Citizen Programs, available at all senior and active adult centers.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, through April 12, by appointment only.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Low-income residents can get free assistance in preparing their personal income tax forms.  Some restrictions apply; call 229-6454 for details and appointment.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, through April 11 by appointment only.
Free with appointment only.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesday afternoons, through April 9.
Free with appointment only.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Income restrictions apply. Call 229-1600 for information and appointments.

 

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesdays, through April 9, by appointment only.

EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern, (702) 229-1515

Income restrictions apply.  Call 229-1515 for information and to make an appointment.

 

VITA Free Tax Form Preparation

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., through April 11, by appointment only.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program is an Internal Revenue Service program designed to help low- and moderate-income taxpayers complete their annual tax returns at no cost. All ages with income under $49,000 are welcome. Call 229-6125 for appointments.

Bunco (ages 50+)
Wednesday, March 6, 10 a.m. Advance registration required.
Cost: $5 with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Enjoy playing Bunco and having a light snack afterwards.

Centennial Hills Active Adult Book Club (ages 50+)
First Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m.; March 6.

Cost: Free with a current annual $2 senior programs membership.
CentennialHillsActiveAdultCenter, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.

Come prepared to discuss this month’s book.

March book: “The Given Day” by Dennis Lehane.

April’s book: “The Art of Racing in the Rain” by Garth Stein.

May’s book: “Defending Jacob” by William Landay.

8th Annual Vision Forum (all ages)

Thursday, March 7, 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Free admission. Those who pre-register by Feb. 27 are guaranteed a free lunch, raffle ticket and expedited Paratransit service, if requested.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Registration and vendors exhibit hall in the adjacent Dula Gym will be open 8-10 a.m. Workshops scheduled 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. include fitness, nutrition, technology tips, goal setting, ADA guidelines, blindness training, transportation, education, health advocacy, low-vision information and a family session. The day is sponsored by the city of Las Vegas, Blindconnect, Nevada Council of the Blind and the Veterans Administration Vision Program. For more information and a registration form, call 229-6454.

 

Springtime Tea Party (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 7, 10 a.m. Register by March 1. Space is limited.

Cost: $2.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Wear your fancy spring hat and bring your favorite teacup to enjoy a variety of teas, fruit, cookies, cakes, music and a raffle.

 

Waffle Day Brunch (ages 50+)
Thursday, March 7, 10 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 1.
Cost: $3.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy waffles, waffles, and more waffles at this brunch.  Come hungry!

Final Arrangements and Wills Lecture (ages 50+)

Monday, March 11, 1:30 p.m.  Must register by March 8.
Free admission.
LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Palm Mortuary representative will lecture on final arrangements and wills.

St. Patrick’s Luncheon, Under the Rainbow (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 14, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration required by March 8. Space is limited.

Cost:  $5; must have senior programs membership.

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

Enjoy a meal of corned beef and cabbage, a traditional St. Patrick’s Day lunch, and entertainment by the Sun City Aliante Songsters.

 

Luck of the Irish Luncheon (ages 50+)

Thursday, March 14, noon. Register by March 8.

Cost: $5.

DoolittleSeniorCenter, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
Enjoy corned beef, cabbage, potatoes, cornbread, dessert, green punch and great company!

 

St. Patty’s Luncheon (ages 50+)

Friday, March 15, 11:30 a.m. Must register by March 12.

Cost: $5.

LieburnSeniorCenter, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.

Enjoy corned beef and cabbage with all the fixings.

 

St. Patrick’s Day Luncheon (ages 50+)
Wednesday, March 20, 11:30 a.m. Advance registration is required by March 15.
Cost: $5.
EastLas VegasCommunity Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave. (702) 229-1515.

Enjoy a traditional St. Patrick’s Day meal.  Wear green, so you don’t get pinched!

Waffle Day Breakfast (ages 50+)

Monday, March 25, 8:30 to 10 a.m. Advance registration required.

Cost: $4

Las VegasSeniorCenter, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.

It’s National Waffle Day!  Enjoy waffles, eggs and bacon for breakfast.

AmeriCorps* State Grant Funds Available

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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MAKE AN IMPRINT ON NEVADA

Each year Nevada AmeriCorps grantees impact the quality of life in Nevada through national service funding provided through the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act. Nevada received more than $2,109,000 in AmeriCorps funding for the 2013-2014 program year and is currently opening its Notice of Funding Opportunity for nonprofits, faith-based organizations, government entities or Indian tribes looking to make a positive imprint through development of a national service program in Nevada.

 

“In 2011-12, more than 308 Nevada AmeriCorps*State programs recruited and managed 3,579 more volunteers throughout the state, an economic impact of in excess of $6,000,000 worth of community service.  AmeriCorps members serve in core areas such as education, human services, public safety and the environment.  We invite new organizations to learn more about how they can become a part of meeting critical needs through national service in Nevada,” said Shawn Lecker-Pomaville, CEO of Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service that develops and administers AmeriCorps*State programs in Nevada.

 

Applicants must be able to demonstrate the capacity to administer federal funds; implement a detailed plan of action to address a local unmet need; present strong connections to the community it serves, and have the ability to raise the required cash match, which averages $30,000. Applicants are strongly encouraged to attend an AmeriCorps Application Instructions webinar to apply.

 

  • National Service in Nevada: Determining How Your Organization Can Fit?

February 22nd at 10am or March 5th at 2pm

Advanced Registration Required

  • AmeriCorps Application Instructions Webinar

April 2nd at 10am or April 4th at 2pm

Advanced Registration Required

To reserve a place in the webinars and find more information on the Nevada Volunteers AmeriCorps Notice of Funding, visit www.nevadavolunteers.org.

All applications must be submitted electronically through eGrants by May 10, 2013 by 5 p.m. PST.

The Home Depot Foundation to Announce Significant Grant to Veterans Village

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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HELP LAUNCH VEGAS LOVES VETERANS CAMPAIGN

 WHAT:                 Fred Wacker, COO of The Home Depot Foundation, will announce the awarding of a significant grant to Veterans Village Las Vegas at a brief ceremony that will also include dozens of associate volunteers from The Home Depot.  The Home Depot Foundation, which has been actively engaged in supporting VeteransVillage since its inception last year, is increasing its financial support to help complete a comprehensive renovation of VeteransVillage’s physical facility, a former Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms.

 

A 103-day fundraising campaign for Veterans Village Las Vegas – VEGAS LOVES VETERANS – will launch that day to encourage locals to donate what they can up to $103 ($1 per day from Valentine’s Day through Memorial Day 2013) – to show support of veterans from all conflicts who have defended our freedoms over the decades. ( www.vvlv.org – click on the Vegas Loves Veterans icon or donate button)

 

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

 

WHEN:                 Thursday, February 14

                                10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

 

WHERE:               Veterans Village Las Vegas

1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South (Just south of Charleston Blvd. on the west side of the street)

Las Vegas, NV89104

 

WHO:                   Fred Wacker, COO, The Home Depot Foundation

Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman

Las Vegas City Councilman Bob Coffin

                                Arnold Stalk, founder and visionary, Veterans Village Las Vegas

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About The Home Depot Foundation:

The Home Depot Foundation is dedicated to improving the homes of U.S. military veterans through financial and volunteer resources to help nonprofit organizations. The Foundation has committed $80 million to these efforts over five years.  Through Team Depot, the company’s associate-led volunteer program, thousands of Home Depot associates volunteer their time and talents to positively transform neighborhoods and perform basic repairs and modifications to homes and facilities serving veterans with critical housing needs. Since its formation in 2002, The Home Depot Foundation has granted more than $340 million to nonprofit organizations improving homes and lives in local communities. To learn more and see our associates in action, visit www.homedepotfoundation.org.

The Home Depot Foundation to Announce Significant Grant to Veterans Village

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

HELP LAUNCH VEGAS LOVES VETERANS CAMPAIGN

WHAT: Fred Wacker, COO of The Home Depot Foundation, will announce the awarding of a significant grant to Veterans Village Las Vegas at a brief ceremony that will also include dozens of associate volunteers from The Home Depot. The Home Depot Foundation, which has been actively engaged in supporting Veterans Village since its inception last year, is increasing its financial support to help complete a comprehensive renovation of Veterans Village’s physical facility, a former Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms.

A 103-day fundraising campaign for Veterans Village Las Vegas – VEGAS LOVES VETERANS – will launch that day to encourage locals to donate what they can up to $103 ($1 per day from Valentine’s Day through Memorial Day 2013) – to show support of veterans from all conflicts who have defended our freedoms over the decades. ( www.vvlv.org – click on the Vegas Loves Veterans icon or donate button)

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

WHEN: Thursday, February 14
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

WHERE: Veterans Village Las Vegas
1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South (Just south of Charleston Blvd. on the west side of the street)
Las Vegas, NV 89104

WHO: Fred Wacker, COO, The Home Depot Foundation
Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman
Las Vegas City Councilman Bob Coffin
Arnold Stalk, founder and visionary, Veterans Village Las Vegas

About Veterans Village:
Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel. It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed. Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need. SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents. www.vvlv.org

About The Home Depot Foundation:
The Home Depot Foundation is dedicated to improving the homes of U.S. military veterans through financial and volunteer resources to help nonprofit organizations. The Foundation has committed $80 million to these efforts over five years. Through Team Depot, the company’s associate-led volunteer program, thousands of Home Depot associates volunteer their time and talents to positively transform neighborhoods and perform basic repairs and modifications to homes and facilities serving veterans with critical housing needs. Since its formation in 2002, The Home Depot Foundation has granted more than $340 million to nonprofit organizations improving homes and lives in local communities. To learn more and see our associates in action, visit www.homedepotfoundation.org.

Free Personal Income Tax Form Preparation Assistance At City Of Las Vegas Senior Centers

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Trained Volunteers Will Assist Seniors And Lower-Income Residents

Volunteers from AARP will offer residents age 50 and older free assistance with personal income tax form preparation and electronic filing at four city active adult and senior centers beginning in February. In addition, participants in the Internal Revenue Service Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program will offer similar free assistance to Nevada residents at the Doolittle Senior Center starting Feb. 19. Income restrictions will apply to qualify for assistance. Advance appointments are required at all locations. Bring a copy of your 2011 income tax return and all of your applicable 2012 paperwork to the appointment. Call a center below between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. weekdays to schedule an appointment. Centers will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, Feb. 1-April 12, by appointment only.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Call 229-6454 for details and to make an appointment.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, Feb. 4-April 11, by appointment only.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesday afternoons, Feb. 5-April 9, by appointment only.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
Call 229-1600 for information and appointments.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesdays, Feb.12-April 9, by appointment only.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern, (702) 229-1515.
Call 229-1515 for information and to make an appointment.

VITA Free Tax Form Preparation
Tuesday-Thursday; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Feb. 19-April 11; by appointment only.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
The VITA program is designed to help low- and moderate-income taxpayers complete their annual tax returns at no cost. All ages with income under $49,000 are welcome. Call (702) 229-6125 for appointments after Feb. 5.

Named Finalist for PR News’ CSR Award among Coca-Cola, Disney and UPS

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

A leading showcase for the most powerful corporate social responsibility and green campaigns has named MGM Resorts International (NYSE: MGM) a finalist for its annual awards program in the category of Overall Leader in CSR Practices – more than 10,000 employees.

MGM Resorts is the only company in the gaming industry and the only company headquartered in Nevada to be named a finalist for PR News’ CSR Awards. Other finalists in its award category include Coca-Cola Enterprises, Disney and UPS. The winner will be named at the National Press Club in Washington, DC on February 11, 2013.

“We count it a true honor to be named a finalist for this PR News’ CSR Award and recognized among other great leaders in corporate social responsibility,” said Jim Murren, Chairman and CEO of MGM Resorts International. “We earnestly believe that the health of our company is directly linked to the welfare of the communities in which we operate and so, as Nevada’s largest private employer, we make it a business imperative to be a leader in all forms of corporate social responsibility.”

Finalists for the PR News’ CSR Awards were chosen by an expert panel that evaluated entries submitted by organizations participating in the award competition. The judging criterion included: creativity, innovation, sound planning, implementation and outcomes. Furthermore, organizations were judged according to the alignment of their strategic objectives with their end goals and proven success.

Since the company’s founding, MGM Resorts has shown a powerful commitment to the fundamental principle of social responsibility. The three major initiatives comprising MGM Resorts’ social responsibility efforts are: Diversity & Inclusion, Philanthropy & Community Engagement, and Environmental Sustainability. Program highlights include:
Diversity & Inclusion

• MGM Resorts was the first company in the gaming and hospitality industry to voluntarily adopt a formal diversity and inclusion policy.
• MGM Resorts has increased and maintained the overall representation of women (more than 40%) and minorities (more than 30%) in the diversity profile of our management team for more than half of the past decade.
• Since 2001, through its Supplier and Construction Diversity programs, MGM Resorts has spent a cumulative total of nearly $3 billion with MWDBE suppliers and contractors (i.e., minority-owned, women-owned and disadvantaged business enterprises).
Philanthropy & Community Engagement
• Since its founding in 2002 to 2012, the employee-driven MGM Resorts Foundation has donated almost $50 million to nonprofit organizations for the betterment of American communities.
• In 2011, the corporate giving program contributed to a combined total of more than 500 nonprofit agencies in Nevada, Michigan and Mississippi.
• MGM Resorts’ donation in 2012 of more than 189 tons of canned food to Three Square, the leading Las Vegas food bank, earned the distinction of the largest single company donation in the nonprofit organization’s history for the third year in a row.
• In 2012, MGM Resorts employees logged more than 113,000 volunteer hours and helped more than 850 charitable organizations meet community needs.
Environmental Responsibility
• At more than 18M sf, CityCenter is the largest LEED® Gold certified development in the world.
• MGM Resorts has reduced electricity consumption by 120 million kWh per year, enough to power 10,450 homes each year.
• The company has increased its recycling rate by more than 420% in four years, achieving nearly 40% diversion in 2011.
• MGM Resorts has reduced water usage by 500 million gallons per year, enough to fill more than 750 Olympic-size swimming pools.
• An unprecedented 15 company resorts have achieved the prestigious Green Key rating for environmental conservation from the largest sustainable operations certification body in the world, Green Key Global.

For more information about MGM Resorts International’s commitment to social responsibility, please visit: http://www.mgmresorts.com/offers/2012/07_annualcorporatesocialresponsibilityreport/index.html.

MGM Resorts International (NYSE: MGM) is one of the world’s leading global hospitality companies, operating destination resort brands including Bellagio, MGM Grand, Mandalay Bay and The Mirage. The Company also owns 51% of MGM China Holdings Limited, which owns the MGM Macau resort and casino and is in the process of developing a gaming resort in Cotai, and 50% of CityCenter in Las Vegas, which features ARIA resort and casino. For more information about MGM Resorts International, visit the Company’s website at www.mgmresorts.com.
For more information, please contact:
Rey Bouknight
Director, Corporate Communications
Phone: (702) 234-3714
Phone 2: (702) 891-1846

National Nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation Joins Forces with Parent-giving to Increase Awareness of Contributions of Caregivers

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The national nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation is pleased to announce a new partnership with Parentgiving.com, based in Montclair, New Jersey. Keith Maddox, CEO of Parentgiving, presented a check for $10,000 to Cass Forkin, founder of Twilight Wish Foundation at their Doylestown, PA offices on January 10, 2013. The funding received from Parentgiving will be used to create a program to recognize and reward deserving senior caregivers.

“As Twilight Wish celebrates the 9th anniversary of our first wish granted, we are thrilled to be embarking on a new path with Parentgiving, a company that shares our dedication to meeting the needs of the elderly,” said Forkin. “There are over 42 million caregivers in the U.S. and many of them struggle with their own physical, financial and mental needs. The main goal of this partnership is to increase awareness of the contributions of caregivers and recognize all they do for their loved ones.”

Said Maddox, “Parentgiving recognizes the strains people face when a senior family member needs care due to health and/or mobility issues. We applaud Twilight Wish for all their work to improve the lives of seniors and are thrilled to partner with them on a program to make caregivers’ wishes come true.” Parentgiving, which sells thousands of caregiving products for seniors, has arranged for additional ongoing contributions to Twilight Wish through a special coupon code, available on the Twilight Wish website, which gives customers deep discounts and Twilight Wish 5% of each sale.

Twilight Wish Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization whose mission is to honor and enrich the lives of deserving seniors through wish granting celebrations that connect generations. Since its founding in 2003, Twilight Wish has granted over 1,865 individual wishes to deserving, low-income seniors, thanks to volunteers, corporate and community involvement, and donations. Recent wishes granted include a visit from a string band for a nursing home resident’s 89th birthday party, transporting a nursing home resident to Christmas Eve dinner with her family and hearing aids for an Army veteran who wished to be able to hear his grandchildren’s voices. For more information on Twilight Wish Foundation, visit its website at www.twilightwish.org or call 1-215-230-8777 ext. 104.

Parentgiving.com is a fast-growing online destination for seniors and their caregivers. The Parentgiving Store offers thousands of homecare products, medical supplies and incontinence products, delivered fast right to the home. The store’s top sellers include durable medical equipment, such as walkers, bed rails, bath safety bars, incontinence items, and daily living aids. Parentgiving.com also offers a wealth of free information on eldercare, including original articles and news, Q&A with experts on aging, senior housing and homecare directories, and other aging-related resources. For more information please visit www.Parentgiving.com or follow them on Twitter.

CONTACT: Mary Farrell, Director of Community Relations, Twilight Wish, 215-230-8777, ext. 103

WestStar CU Converts Smiles to Cash for Opportunity Village

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Las Vegas, Nev. – On Friday, Jan. 4 at 4 p.m., WestStar Credit Union will be making a $16,000 donation to Opportunity Village as the culmination of their 2012 charity campaign: A Mile of Smiles. In August 2012, WestStar Credit Union set out on a mission to collect a mile’s worth of smiles with the intention of donating $1 for every smile collected to Opportunity Village. The Nevada-based credit union launched the Mile of Smiles campaign to remind Nevadans that a simple smile can make a difference; that a smile is contagious and has the ability to make someone’s day brighter. They have met their goal and this sentiment now equates to a $16,000 donation from WestStar Credit Union, on the behalf of the smiling participants, to Opportunity Village, Las Vegas’ Favorite Charity.

Over the past several months, WestStar sent teams of volunteer employees out to different local venues including Fremont Street, UNLV campus, local malls, Las Vegas Wranglers hockey games, The Great Santa Run and even the Magical Forest at Opportunity Village to capture pictures of people’s smiles. Their efforts, partnered with the local Las Vegans who uploaded their own smile pictures to the gallery at www.amileofsmiles.org <http://www.amileofsmiles.org> , will conclude in one giant donation to Opportunity Village.

The donation presentation will be at the Magical Forest located at 6300 W. Oakey Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89146, this Friday, January 4 at 4 p.m. WestStar’s CEO, Rick Schmidt, Vice President of Business Development, Mona Joseph, and Marketing Manager, Kelly Cook will be presenting the donation to Dawn Newburg, Resource Development Director for Opportunity Village.

Membership in WestStar Credit Union is open to anyone employed in the Gaming Industry of Nevada and many other employer groups, including employees and members of AAA Nevada and members of the Friends of Nevada Wilderness conservation group. Family members and those living in the same household of anyone who is eligible are also eligible. A full list of eligible employer groups can be found on their website, www.weststar.org/eligibility <http://www.weststar.org/eligibility> .
ABOUT OPPORTUNITY VILLAGE
MISSION
Opportunity Village is a not-for-profit organization that serves people within our community with significant intellectual disabilities, to improve their lives and the lives of their families.

Opportunity Village was founded in 1954 by seven families who were determined to give their disabled children the best lives possible. 58 years later, Opportunity Village is one of the most recognized and respected Community Rehabilitation Programs in the United States.

Nevada’s largest employer of people with disabilities, Opportunity Village serves nearly 2000 individuals annually, providing vocational training, employment, habilitation and social recreation programs and services that make their lives more productive and interesting.

Opportunity Village citizens – individuals who were previously considered unemployable – work at Opportunity Village’s Employment Resource Centers and in jobs throughout the community, collectively earning wages amounting to more than $7.6 million in 2012. They are hard-working and diligent, proudly paying taxes and happily leading more fulfilling lives.

Primarily a self-funded organization, Opportunity Village generates the majority of its operational funding through its employment contracts and fundraising efforts such as the Magical Forest and Great Santa Run, saving Nevada taxpayers $33.7 million annually.

City Of Las Vegas February 2013 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation & Community Special Events

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

Co-ed Fall Flag Football Registration Opens (ages 6-14)
Register Jan. 7-March 1 at city community centers listed below for league play March 16-May 11.
Cost: $75 per person, includes NFL team jersey and shorts.
Cimarron Rose Community Center, 5591 N. Cimarron Road, (702) 229-1607.
Veterans Memorial Leisure Services Center, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.
A birth certificate is required to register. Volunteer coaches are needed. Cost includes post-season tournament. No games will be scheduled for Saturday, March 30.

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman
Thursday, Feb. 7, 9 to 10 a.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.
Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

Ward 1 Fit Family Health Festival & Trail Walk (all ages)
Saturday, Feb. 9, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Free admission. T-shirts available for the first 100 attendees. Raffle tickets for sale.
Pioneer Park, 7449 Braswell Drive.
Join the Outside Las Vegas Foundation, Weight Watchers and the city of Las Vegas for a fun health festival for the whole family. Enjoy a community expo with health and outdoor vendors in the park as well as trail walks to nearby parks. Learn about many fun ways to get active and healthy in our community. Contact Robin at (702) 229-6405 for more information.

Raptor Play Park Grand Opening (all ages)
Saturday, Feb. 16, 10 a.m. to noon.
Thunderbird Family Sports Complex, 6105 N. Durango Drive at Tropical Parkway.
Bring the family out to experience the free red, white and blue opening of the Raptor Play Park. This new phase to the park will add landscaping and turf areas, lighted sidewalk extensions, a picnic shade shelter, site furnishings, off-site improvements and a scaled F-22 Raptor Stealth Fighter Jet exhibit. Light refreshments will be offered while supplies last.
Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Showcase (U14-U19)
Saturday-Monday, Feb.16-18. (Team check-in Feb. 15.)
Free admission for spectators. $1,000 team entry. Team registration closed Dec. 28, 2012.
Bettye Wilson Soccer Complex, 7353 Eugene Ave., and other Las Vegas fields to be announced.
The largest international youth soccer tournament in the country will take place in Las Vegas Presidents’ Day weekend, Feb. 16-18. More than 6,000 soccer players ages 14 to 19, from at least 11 foreign countries and 28 U.S. states, will square off in soccer fields around the valley. The event is co-hosted by the city of Las Vegas and the Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club, and is expected to attract college soccer coaches and recruiters from across the country to scout for both male and female athletes. Spectator admission and parking are free at all games.

Matches will be played from 8:45 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. See the website for specific field locations, times and match-ups. Medals and trophies will be presented to winning teams following each championship game, beginning about 11 a.m. Monday and continuing to approximately 4 p.m. Accepted teams, player profiles, college coaches expected to attend, tournament schedule and program, participating hotels, and more information is available on the event website at www.LVMayorsCup.com.

Free Community Garden Class at Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs
Saturday, Feb. 23, 9 to 11 a.m.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs, 9200 Tule Springs Road, (702) 229-8100.
Join Ward 6 City Councilman Steve Ross and Dr. Angela O’Callaghan of the Nevada Cooperative Extension for a free class, “Growing in Small Places.” Learn how to plant herbs, vegetables and fruits in small areas or containers.

Adaptive Recreation

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 6 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants will enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed school district staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.
# # #
Media Contact:
Margaret Kurtz
Public Information Officer
City of Las Vegas
495 S. Main St., 7th Floor
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 229-6993
Cell (702) 249-1828
E-mail: mkurtz@lasvegasnevada.gov

Nevada puts Citizenship and Service into Action

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Nevada Volunteers encourages Nevadans to Re-Commit Themselves to Service

RENO/LAS VEGAS, January 8, 2013 – Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service, encourages all Nevadans to use the legacy of Dr. King to re-commit themselves to service.

In addition to promoting volunteerism across the State, Nevada Volunteers produces the premier volunteer recognition event in Nevada. Inspirational volunteer service will be recognized at the 11th Annual Governor’s Points of Light Awards, where the recipient of the Award in six categories will be announced by Governor Brian Sandoval. In conjunction with the Governor’s Points of Light Awards, community partners, NV Energy and MGM Resorts International, who believe in the power of volunteering, join Nevada Volunteers to share the importance of corporate volunteerism in all aspects of business through the Volunteer and Corporate Engagement Summit on January 18th.

“In this time of economic uncertainty, service is a powerful way for citizens, nonprofits, the private sector, faith-based organizations, and government to work together to meet critical needs,” said Shawn Lecker-Pomaville, CEO of Nevada Volunteers. “Governor Sandoval has made service a cornerstone of his administration, and as his commission on service, we applaud the commitment Nevadans will make to their communities across the state during the MLK Day holiday.”

AmeriCorps*State members, funded by Nevada Volunteers, will host projects throughout Nevada for citizens to get involved.

• In Reno, Children’s Cabinet AmeriCorps members will host a panel on social justice encouraging teenagers to consider what their own contribution to their community might be on January 15th.
• In Winnemucca, Rural Nevada AmeriCorps members from the Nevada Outdoor School have organized a MLK Community 5K Walk/Run, encouraging citizens to make a volunteer commitment for free admission on January 19th.
• In Las Vegas, United Way of Southern Nevada and Great Basin Institute’s Nevada Conservation Corps AmeriCorps members will be distributing fire prevention and safety information with the Red Cross of Southern Nevada.

For more information on how to register for the Governor’s Points of Light Awards and the Volunteer and Corporate Engagement Summit (media advisory attached) or MLK Day projects, visit www.nevadavolunteers.org.

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About Nevada Volunteers Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service, shapes a culture of service and citizenship by bringing interested people together with important causes through volunteering and national service. Nevada Volunteers provides training to strengthen volunteer programs and track volunteer impact, provides easy access to volunteer opportunities through our website (www.nevadavolunteers.org ) and sponsors recognition programs for outstanding volunteers. Nevada Volunteers administers the Nevada AmeriCorps funding. Since 1998, Nevada Volunteers has engaged more than 2,618 Nevada AmeriCorps members in volunteer services across the state of Nevada.

AARP Launches New YouTube Series, The Cheap Life with Jeff Yeager

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

AARP Savings Expert’s Weekly Series Helps People Get the Most for their Money
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Today, AARP launched the latest in its original video series on YouTube, “The Cheap Life with Jeff Yeager,” featuring AARP savings expert Jeff Yeager. During each weekly episode, Yeager, who is also known as the “Ultimate Cheapskate,” will discuss tips and tricks on how consumers of all ages can pay less for just about everything, save for retirement, get the most for their money and up-cycle or reuse everyday items through creative repurposing.
(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20070209/NYF043LOGO)
“We know our members want programming that features fun and everyday ways to save,” said Larry Gannon, AARP Vice President of TV and Radio Programming. “‘The Cheap Life’ is one way AARP is meeting the wants and needs of our members and others—by helping them and their families save real money and live the life they want, but at a fraction of the cost.”
For the past four years, Jeff Yeager has been a popular contributor to AARP via online articles and “savings challenges,” print articles in AARP’s Bulletin and “AARP The Magazine,” AARP television series and web-only videos and a weekly blog. Past videos featuring Jeff are among the most viewed and many of his articles are among the top read articles in the money section of www.aarp.org.
“Our research shows that AARP members are using YouTube to view videos online,” Gannon said. “And through this popular interface, ‘The Cheap Life’ delivers fun and engaging ideas on how to enjoy life more by spending less. Subscribers to The Cheap Life YouTube Channel will be able to interact directly with Jeff and have their tips and savings ideas shared with a worldwide audience.”
Each three to five minute episode of “The Cheap Life” will link back to relevant articles, blog posts and other helpful tools found on www.aarp.org. Episodes may include:
The Repurposing Challenge—Encouraging viewers to find multiple uses for everyday household items;
Don’t Throw That Away!—Jeff shares one of his many favorite repurposing ideas;
Cheapskate Shout-out—Jeff acknowledges people who have embraced the “cheap life;” and,
Cheapskate Hall of Fame/Shame—Jeff identifies people who have excelled or failed at being frugal.
“The Cheap Life” is part of a customized AARP YouTube destination that streamlines the user experience and better organizes the more than 2,000 videos available for site visitors. In 2013, AARP will continue to expand its online content offerings by developing premium original programming for the AARP YouTube channel in the form of weekly series focusing on the areas of money, health and beauty, technology and travel.
Consumers can subscribe to “The Cheap Life” for free by visiting www.YouTube.com/CheapLifeChannel and becoming a registered YouTube user. The first episode, “Travel Tips for the Frugal,” can be found by visiting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zob8NFodEtw.
AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people 50+ have independence, choice and control in ways that are beneficial to them and society as a whole. AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to either political campaigns or candidates. We produce AARP The Magazine, the definitive voice for Americans 50+ and the world’s largest-circulation magazine; AARP Bulletin, the go-to news source for the 50+ audience; www.aarp.org ; AARP VIVA, a bilingual lifestyle multimedia platform addressing the interests and needs of Hispanic Americans; and national television and radio programming including My Generation and Inside E Street. The AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older persons in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. AARP has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Learn more at www.aarp .org .

CONTACT: David L. Allen, +1-202-434-2560, media@aarp.org

Civil Air Patrol’s first Spaatz award recipient dies

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Civil Air Patrol’s first Spaatz award recipient dies after distinguished public service career
Decorated CAP cadet from Michigan became a skilled Air Force combat pilot who flew with the Thunderbirds and served as a trusted congressional aide

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. – Douglas C. Roach, the first recipient of Civil Air Patrol’s highest cadet award, the General Carl A. Spaatz Award, died Jan. 11 at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., from complications related to cancer. He was 70.
“The Spaatz Association wishes to express its deep regret and condolences in the passing of Doug Roach,” said retired U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Ted Bowlds, the association’s president. “As the first Spaatz award recipient, Doug certainly set the standard in the qualities represented in all Spaatz recipients that followed. We have him and his family in our thoughts and prayers.”
Roach made Civil Air Patrol and Spaatz history as a Michigan Wing cadet in the 1960s. He was born in Romulus, Mich., on Nov. 18, 1942.
“Doug was handpicked by Jack Sorenson (CAP’s cadet program leader at the time) to be tested for the first Spaatz,” said Col. Larry Trick, a Spaatz recipient and former president of the association. “Jack noticed Doug in 1962 at the National Cadet Competition, where he was commander of the Michigan Wing drill team that won the competition that year.”
Trick said the Spaatz test in its infancy was handwritten, with mostly essay-type questions. Today the test has evolved into a more sophisticated, multi-step process, but the Spaatz award remains the most coveted of CAP’s cadet honors.
Named after the first chief of staff of the Air Force and the first chairman of the CAP National Board, the Spaatz award is presented to cadets who demonstrate excellence in leadership, character, fitness and aerospace education. Cadets typically qualify for the award after devoting an average of five years to progress through 16 achievements in the CAP Cadet Program.
Once a cadet achieves the award, he or she is entitled to the grade of cadet colonel. On average, only two cadets in 1,000 earn the Spaatz award. Since the award’s inception in 1964, CAP has presented the Spaatz award to less than 1,900 cadets.
Roach became a highly decorated officer and skilled U.S. Air Force pilot. After flying 516 combat missions during several tours in Vietnam between 1969 and 1972, he was a pilot with the Air Force flight performance team, the Thunderbirds, from 1973-75. He began with the aerial demonstration team flying Thunderbird #6 when the team flew the F-4 Phantom and he served as the team’s logistics officer. Roach retired from the Air Force with the rank of colonel.
Despite the notoriety he gained above the clouds in the Air Force, Brig. Gen. Richard L. Anderson said Roach was grounded in the achievements of his youth, which included his “place of honor in the annals of CAP history” as the first Spaatz recipient.
“I remember meeting Doug for the first time at a Spaatz Association event soon after the organization was created in the mid-1990s,” said Anderson, past president of the association and former CAP national commander who now chairs the organization’s Board of Governors. “Although Doug’s professional military and congressional staff career precluded his remaining active in CAP, he remained dedicated to the purposes of the CAP Cadet Program and attributed CAP with his later accomplishments in life.”
“He was a hero to me and many cadets in the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s,” said Trick. “Often, we would see him on the Hill during National CAP Legislative Day. He always had a great smile and handshake for the cadets.”
Roach earned a bachelor’s degree in government at the University of Michigan and, after his distinguished service in the Air Force, a master’s degree in national security studies from Georgetown University.
He continued his career of public service on Capitol Hill, most recently as the longtime staff director for the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces.
In his obituary this week, Congressional Quarterly’s Roll Call said Roach was a cornerstone of every defense authorization law since 1991, whether as a professional staff member on the veteran defense panel, or its staff director since 2001.
“His work was key to developing the smart weapons we use today,” said Trick.
The longtime congressional aide also was noted for serving both Democrats and Republicans, working through important national security legislation. In the Roll Call obituary, Rep. Michael R. Turner, the Ohio Republican who chairs the Tactical Air and Land Forces panel, said, “Doug Roach was a trusted counselor to members on both sides of the aisle for many years. He always gave us his best advice, regardless of party interest or agenda.”
Roach’s boss, House Armed Services Committee Chairman Howard “Buck” McKeon, R-Calif., called him “a selfless servant and true hero.”

Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than 61,000 members nationwide, operating a fleet of 550 aircraft. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 80 lives annually. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to nearly 27,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet programs. CAP received the World Peace Prize in 2011 and has been performing missions for America for 71 years. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit www.gocivilairpatrol.com or www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.

Contact info: Julie DeBardelaben – jdebardelaben@capnhq.gov – 334-953-7748, ext. 250
Steve Cox – scox@capnhq.gov – 334-953-7748, ext. 251

Socks For Seniors

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Socks for Seniors is an annual community service project through which we organize collecting NEW socks to be distributed to elderly in local area nursing homes around the holidays.

 

The program begins with Make A Difference Day Saturday October27 – The Official Kick-off of the 2012 Socks For Seniors Campaign and runs thru Christmas.

 

We are looking for local area coordinators near Henderson to help with collecting socks this year.

 

There are two major ways that you could help us-

 

1. Help us promote Socks For Seniors. We are available for interviews. Media support in 2011 helped us grow the program into over 250 cities coast to coast. Complete information is available on our website about the program which my wife and I started 11 years ago. It is 100% volunteer based. We neither take or make money from it. We do not collect money, we collect SOCKS!

 

If you could schedule a time for an interview to help promote Socks For Seniors near Henderson please visit this link:

 

http://www.socksforseniors.com/media.html

 

In 2011 we did hundreds of media interviews. This form will help us keep everything organized so (hopefully) nothing falls thru the cracks!

 

2. Host a Sock Drive. It all starts with 1 person, 1 box, 1 location. It’s easy…and all the socks stay in the local Henderson area! If you have a nursing home, assisted living center or other senior community in mind for distribution – GREAT! If not,we will help connect you with a local senior community for distributing the socks at the end of the sock drive.

 

If you can decorate a box and find a location or locations for boxes – that’s all there is to it. Then together we can promote the sock drive.

 

To collect Socks For Seniors – please sign up atthis link:

 

http://www.socksforseniors.com/register.html

 

Then we can stay in touch with you during the campaign with updates and answering any questions you may have. You will also receive an email with signs and logos for the drive and otherinformation.

 

A BIG THANKS for reading this about Socks For Seniors. I wanted to get it out before everyone gets busy and begins thinking about the Holidays – which always seems to happen right after Halloween.

 

If I can answer any questions – please just reply to this email. If you can help us promote the program or collect socks please click a link above and you will be taken to the sign form.

 

Thanks again!

 

Jamie
Socks for Seniors
www.socksforseniors.com

 

Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Helping Hands Surgical Care Selects Eight Uninsured Nevadans to Receive no-cost surgeries on Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

WHAT: Eight uninsured Nevadans suffering from a variety of conditions will receive surgeries at no cost from Helping Hands Surgical Care (HHSC), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen and his wife, Kelly Petersen, who also serves as HHSC’s unpaid executive director. The surgeries will be performed by Dr. Petersen and other Las Vegas surgeons, with the assistance from the medical staff at Valley View Surgery Center – all of whom are volunteering their services for the day. A medical advisory board screened the applications to select patients to receive no cost surgeries. HHSC’s mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured Nevadans without the means to pay for medically necessary surgeries.

WHEN: CHARITY SURGERY DAY – HELPING HANDS SURGICAL CARE
November 13, 2012
Surgeries scheduled on the hour from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (First arrivals starting at 8 a.m.)
Patients and doctors are available to media prior to or on surgery day.

WHERE: Valley View Surgery Center
1330 S. Valley View Blvd.
Las Vegas, NV 89102
PATIENTS:
Jeffery Silverman, 52, Hernia repair, mesh removal
Silverman had an initial hernia repair in 2009 and has been in constant pain ever since. With very little money left in the bank and no insurance, he is embarrassed to ask for help, but grateful Dr. Petersen is willing to remove the mesh that was used in his initial surgery and repair it again without mesh. He has formed a large support group on Facebook comprised of people around the country suffering from the same condition, and he is grateful to be chosen for free surgery. He can’t wait to reclaim his life.

Donald Sykes, 51, Umbilical hernia repair
Sykes is minister of Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ, married with four children and eight grandchildren. He had insurance at one point but lost it due to his inability to keep up with the payments. Sykes has suffered from his hernia condition for nine years and is in considerable pain. He is grateful that the pain will be gone soon, that his life will be extended and the hernia will no longer be visible through his clothing.

Mariana Flores, 26, Umbilical hernia repair
Flores is married with two sons, ages 2 and 7. She is excited she will be able to help her sons and be active again. She feels she has not been a good mother since her mobility has been so limited by excessive pain. In fact, she has not been able to clean her home. She is so grateful she was chosen to receive charity surgery so she can become a better mother and wife and not dependent on others.

Mark Babcock, 54, Umbilical and Right inguinal hernia
Babcock, who is single with three children, is unable to work because of his medical condition. He currently lives with a friend free of charge. He has been to the emergency room twice and was turned away both times because the surgery to cure his condition is considered elective. He is looking forward to regaining the confidence he has lost over the last seven years as he has struggled with debilitating pain. He is extremely thankful to finally receive the help he needs to get back his life.

Mario Zaccone, 49, Right inguinal hernia
Zaccone has suffered from his hernia for five years and is unemployed because of his inability to work due to pain. Previously, he worked in the food industry where he was required to lift, which is impossible for him now given his current condition. He is single with four children and lives with his mother because of his inability to provide for his children and care for himself. He is extremely grateful for HHSC and looks forward to beginning his life again.

Paul Labarre, 42, Umbilical hernia repair
Labarre is a veteran construction worker who with specific skills in flooring and laying carpet. He is unable to work due to his hernia and has lost his home and insurance. He currently lives with his parents and is looking forward to being healthy again and passing a physical so he can go back to work and provide for his family.

Michael Haws, 53, Left inguinal hernia repair
Haws has worked for years in the construction and oil industries. He has not been able to lift due to his hernia condition. Unable to provide for himself, he has been forced to move in with his brother. His current situation has had a major effect on his self-esteem, and he feels drained both physically and emotionally. He is thrilled to be chosen and looks forward to a bright future.

Linda Willis, 59, Trigger finger
Willis has been without medical insurance since she lost her job several years ago. Right-handed, she has not been able to do anything with her right hand for a long time. This includes preparing food, writing and simple daily tasks. Willis has been forced to move in with her daughter for both financial support and assistance with her daily care. She is excited about the future and the possibility of regaining some independence. She particularly looks forward to resuming things she enjoys, including sewing and refinishing furniture.

PARTICIPATING DOCTORS:

Dr. Kevin C. Petersen, General Surgeon
Dr. Bishr Hijazi, Hand Surgeon
Dr. Jon Darwin Halling, Anesthesiologist
Dr. Hosny Habashy, Anesthesiologist

COMMUNITY SUPPORT:
The Las Vegas community is coming together to support the efforts of HHSC.
• Valley View Surgery Center is donating the use of the one operating room for an entire day.
• The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf is providing coffee and breakfast for the physicians and medical staff (up to 35 people) on surgery day.

About Helping Hands Surgical Care
Helping Hands Surgical Care is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured individuals without the means to pay for medically necessary, quality of life surgeries. Founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen of Las Vegas, Nevada based No Insurance Surgery, Helping Hands Surgical Care values the health and well-being of each individual regardless of their ability to pay. The organization is guided by its focus on the physician-patient relationship and its dedication to transforming and improving the lives of those it serves. For more information, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com or call 702-242-5393.

Nomination Deadline for Governor’s Points of Light Awards Approaching!

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Contact: Shawn Lecker-Pomaville, CEO
(775) 825-1900 | shawn@nevadavolunteers.org
www.nevadavolunteers.org
Nomination Deadline for Governor’s Points of Light Awards Approaching!

RENO/LAS VEGAS, November 8, 2012 — The deadline to nominate a deserving individual or group for the 2013 Governor’s Points of Light Awards is quickly approaching!

These awards will recognize the dedication, leadership, and innovation of volunteers and volunteer programs throughout Nevada. Recipients and finalists will be honored in six service areas:

• Northern Nevada Individual
• Southern Nevada Individual
• Rural Nevada Individual
• Nonprofit and community organization
• Corporate and business volunteer program
• Volunteer Manager

Nominations must be submitted no later than November 11, 2012 by 5pm PST at http://nevadavolunteers.org/gpol/gpol_nomination.html. The recipients will be recognized at the 2013 Governor’s Points of Light Awards Luncheon at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, Nevada on January 18, 2013.

To find out more information about the Governor’s Points of Light Awards and the Volunteer and Corporate Engagement Summit, visit http://nevadavolunteers.org/gpol/POL_Landing.html.
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About Nevada Volunteers
Nevada Volunteers, the Governor’s Commission on Service, shapes a culture of service and citizenship by bringing interested people together with important causes through volunteering and national service. Nevada Volunteers provides training to strengthen volunteer programs and track volunteer impact, provides easy access to volunteer opportunities through our website (www.nevadavolunteers.org ) and sponsors recognition programs for outstanding volunteers. Nevada Volunteers administers the Nevada AmeriCorps funding. Since 1998 Nevada Volunteers has engaged more than 2,323 Nevada AmeriCorps members in volunteer services across the state of Nevada.

Ophthalmologists Offer Sight-Saving Eye Care to Prevent Blindness

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

EyeCare America promotes vision loss prevention in U.S. through no out of pocket-cost eye exams and care

According to the World Health Organization, nearly 180 million people suffer from blindness or visual impairment globally, yet 75 percent of blindness could be prevented or treated with sight-saving eye care. In observance of World Blindness Awareness Month, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, urges the public to make eye exams and care a top priority to maintain their healthy vision.

A variety of problems are responsible for blindness around the world, and the leading causes of blindness and vision loss in the United States are age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. More than two-thirds of visually impaired adults in the U.S. are age 65 or older. The number of Americans with age-related eye disease is expected to double within the next three decades unless something is done to reverse the trend.

To better prevent blindness in the U.S., EyeCare America encourages seniors to visit www.eyecareamerica.org to find out if they qualify for an eye exam and up to one year of care at no out-of-pocket cost. EyeCare America matches eligible patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – who will provide a comprehensive medical eye examination.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

EyeCare America is made possible through the generous support of the Knights Templar Foundation, Genentech and Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision. EyeSmart provides the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. OjosSanos™ is the Spanish-language version of the program. Visit www.geteyesmart.org or www.ojossanos.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Helping Hands Surgical Care Announces Second Annual Charity Surgery Day

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Local nonprofit seeks qualified patients to receive medically necessary surgery at no cost

Dr. Kevin Petersen, and Kelly Petersen, co-founders of Helping Hands Surgical Care (HHSC), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured Nevadans without the means to pay for medically necessary surgeries, announce the second annual Charity Surgery Day, Nov. 13, 2012. HHSC doctors will provide 10 free surgeries that day to uninsured Nevadans without the means to pay and who do not qualify for government assistance through plans such as Medicare.

Dr. Petersen, a board certified general surgeon who has practiced for more than 26 years, along with his wife, Kelly, HHSC’s unpaid executive director, launched HHSC last year to end chronic pain and suffering for Nevadans with no other options. Since the organization’s inaugural Charity Surgery Day on Nov. 15 last year, HHSC has performed 24 free surgeries for uninsured Nevadans.

HHSC is seeking patients who may qualify to receive medically necessary surgery at no cost on Charity Surgery Day. Applicants must qualify both financially and medically and are screened via an advisory panel comprised of medical professionals.

Qualified patients must have a stable, chronic, non-emergency condition that requires surgery to restore a disabled patient to normal function or to remove a potentially life threatening condition, such as hernia repair, gall bladder removal, select gynecological surgeries, select back surgeries and cataract removal. Candidates must reside in Nevada, lack medical insurance and the resources to pay for surgery. They must also be acceptable surgical candidates. To review patient eligibility requirements and apply for surgery, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com and click on the How to Apply link.

In addition to Petersen, doctors working with HHSC include Allan Stahl, M.D., cardiology, Michael Verni, M.D., urology; Cameron Earl, M.D., plastic surgery; Jeannie Khavkin, M.D., otolaryngology and facial plastic surgery; Yevgeniy Khavkin, M.D., spine surgery; Ronette Cyka, M.D., gynecology; and George McMickle, M.D., ophthalmology and eye surgery. Medical District Surgery Center, has once again committed to donating the use of operating rooms on Charity Surgery Day.

“This past year has been one of the most gratifying in my entire career,” said Dr. Petersen, who has personally performed several of the organization’s free surgeries over the past year. “Helping people to get back their lives, to go back to work, to restore their ability to provide for their families and to start enjoying life again, is incredibly rewarding and reminds me of the reason I practice medicine,” said Petersen. “The spirit of HHSC has caught on in the medical community, and we are grateful for the other doctors who have willingly joined our program. It is truly a team effort that takes members of the entire medical community working together to make a difference.”

While all participating doctors waive their fees, surgery isn’t free. Costs such as lab fees, anesthesia, prescription, nurses and surgical techs must still be paid.

To volunteer to provide medical services, to make a donation that covers hard costs of surgery, or to inquire about patient qualifications to receive charity surgery, call 702-242-5393 or visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com.

About Helping Hands Surgical Care
Helping Hands Surgical Care is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to fund and facilitate surgeries for uninsured and underinsured individuals without the means to pay for medically necessary, quality of life surgeries. Founded by Dr. Kevin Petersen of Las Vegas, Nevada based No Insurance Surgery, Helping Hands Surgical Care values the health and well-being of each individual regardless of their ability to pay. The organization is guided by its focus on the physician-patient relationship and its dedication to transforming and improving the lives of those it serves. For more information, visit www.HelpingHandsSurgicalCare.com or call 702-242-5393.

Cultural Arts – December 2012 Calendar Of Events

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Cultural Arts
December 2012 Calendar Of Events
495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Oct. 2, 2012
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

 

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Centers will be closed Dec. 25 for holiday observance.

West Las Vegas Arts Center Winter Class Registration Opens (all ages)
Saturday, Dec. 1, 8 a.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Registration is open through Dec. 29, for six-week class sessions to be held Jan. 2-Feb. 9, 2013. Offered cultural arts instruction includes African Drum – Beginner / Intermediate / Advanced; African Dance for Children; African Dance Teens/Adults; Baby Ballet & Tap; Ballet – Beginner / Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop – Beginner / Intermediate; Yoga – Health & Wellness; Tae Kwon Do – Beginner / Intermediate / Advanced; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; and Private Piano / Voice lessons. To register or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call 229-4800.

Winter Class Registration Opens (ages 2-adult)
Saturday, Dec. 1, 10 a.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Registration is open through Jan. 9, 2013, for 10-week sessions of classes to be held Jan. 12-March 23. Offered courses include Ballet, Jazz, Hip Hop, Zumba, Salsa Rueda, Drawing, Art for Youth & Teens, private music lessons, private or semi-private dance lessons and Saturday tots classes in dance for ages 2 years and up. Registration is open the same dates for Rainbow Company youth theatre classes for ages 4-17. To register or for more information, visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-6383.

Toys for Tots Square Dance (ages 8+)
Saturday, Dec. 1; introductory lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $6 with new unwrapped toy; $8 without toy. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Square dance to help the U.S. Marines make children’s Christmas wishes come true. Enjoy callers Andy Finch, Joe Valvo, Vern Vernazarro and Ron Sowash of Las Vegas and caller Arlen Miller of Northridge, Calif., with guest cuer Ron Hartzell. Newcomers and families are welcomed. No need to bring a partner. Class-level dances, Plus and Round dances will be included, as well as a chance to win door prizes. Refreshments will be available. Cosponsored by the Stardusters, Las Vegas Square & Round Dance Club, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 348-4906 or 229-6383, or visit www.lasvegassquarenrounddancers.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m., Dec. 5 and 12.
Cost: $4 dollars per person per week. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese and Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. Cosponsored by the Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing Club of Las Vegas, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 562-9889 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.
(((MORE)))

Afternoon Delight Tea Dances (adults)
Thursdays, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., Dec. 6 and 13.
Cost: $5 general admission per person. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Great music and a friendly atmosphere welcome dancers of all levels to the center’s beautiful ballroom dance floor. Loy Au will lead the dance instruction and demonstrations for new dances each week. A themed dance will be featured each month. Invite your friends and bring snacks to share. No dance will be held Dec. 20 or 27. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m., Dec. 7 and 14.
Cost: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or (702) 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Presents “Honk!” (all ages)
Dec. 7, 8, 14 and 15 at 7 p.m.; Dec. 9, 15 and 16 at 2 p.m.
Cost: $7 adults; $5 teen/senior/military; $3 children age 12 and younger.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
And for the holidays, join the Rainbow Company Youth Theatre for “Honk!,” the musical story of Ugly, whose odd looks incite prejudice among his family and neighbors, until he discovers his true and glorious destiny. Tickets are available by calling 229-6383 or 229-6553, or online at www.artslasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Danny Wright “An Intimate Christmas” (all ages) – canceled
Friday, Dec. 21, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Call (702) 229-3515 for more details. A replacement performer may be scheduled.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Dec. 21, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.

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Kwanzaa 2012 (all ages)
A Celebration of Culture and the Rites of Passage Graduation ‘Crossing Over’ Ceremony
Cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District
Saturday, Dec. 22, 3 p.m.
Admission is free, but tickets are required and may be picked up in advance at the West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
West Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 591-3989.
Join the community celebration to share the meaning of Kwanzaa and embrace and celebrate the accomplishments of our youth graduate participants in the annual Rites of Passage mentoring workshops. Please call (702) 229-4800 for more information.

Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks Present “Holidaze in Hicksville” (all ages)
Saturday, Dec. 22, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 in advance, $15 at the door.
Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St., (702) 229-3515.
Hicksville show will feature a live performance of songs from the acclaimed album Crazy for Christmas, as well as several Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks classics. Free limited parking available at the Historic Fifth Street School; metered parking available in metered lots across the street both west and south of school. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6383, or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. For more information on the performers, visit www.danhicks.net/.

Exhibitions

Public Employee Art Exhibit
Oct. 18-Dec. 6, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
The Public Employee Art Exhibit was open to any artist who resided in Southern Nevada and is employed by the state, county or city government. Only original artwork was accepted. If you have any questions, contact gallery coordinator, Jeanne Voltura, at 229-1012 or e-mail to jvoltura@lasvegasnevada.gov. For more information, go to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Mountains and Valleys Without End”
Artist Daniel Gottsegen
Through Dec. 8; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The artist’s experience working in and studying the environment from both a scientific (naturalist) and personal orientation has shaped the way he considers (and constructs) his world and his work. He is interested in the tension and duality between our romantic conceptions of nature and the reality of the potential environmental calamities we are facing. He seeks to embody this tension in his work by the use of technology (video that he shoots) to derive image sources, or in recent work (the Wanderungen series) by juxtaposing images. For more information on the gallery program call (702) 229-1012 or go to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Gnot The Proper Gnomenclature” (all ages)
Through Jan. 17, 2013, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall, 495 S. Main St., second-floor outside patio, (702) 229-4631.
The public is invited to enjoy two whimsical garden gnome sculptures by Las Vegas artist Jesse Smigel. On display for viewing, photos and videos, the gnomes are carved from dense foam. One standing gnome is 9 feet tall; the second reclining gnome is approximately 9 feet long. No sitting or standing on the sculptures, please.
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Healthy Aging: Up2Me

October 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

Healthy Aging: Up2Me
According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 125 million people suffer from at least one chronic illness. If you are an adult with a chronic condition such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain or anxiety, this Healthy Aging : Up2Me workshop can help you.

It’s also important for family caregivers to avoid developing a chronic illness due to stress and neglect of their own health and well being.
• Join this FREE 2 1/2 hour workshop held each week for six weeks.
• Learn from trained volunteer leaders who have cared for those with chronic
health conditions.
• Set goals for yourself.
Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health
888 W. Bonneville Ave • Las Vegas, NV 89106
Fridays: September 28 – November 2, 2012
12:30 – 3 p.m.
Sign up with Susan Hirsch at hirschs2@ccf.org or 702-483-6023.

Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.

September 24, 2012 by · Comments Off on Blindness and Vision Loss Spike by 23 Percent in the U.S.
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

American Academy of Ophthalmology Urges Seniors to Save their Sight through Prevention and Early Detection

Blindness and vision impairment are on the rise in the United States. A recent report by Prevent Blindness America indicates that, since the year 2000, incidence of blindness and vision impairment has increased by 23 percent among Americans age 40 and older.[i] However, most blindness in this country is preventable with proper eye care. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and EyeCare America urge Americans to get regular eye exams to better prevent and detect sight-stealing eye diseases.

Rising rates of age-related eye diseases and conditions are largely to blame for the increase in vision loss. Four of the most common causes of vision loss are diabetic retinopathy, where blood vessels in the retina swell or become blocked due to diabetes; age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a breakdown of the eye’s macula; glaucoma, an eye disease that damages the optic nerve; and cataracts, in which the eye’s lens becomes clouded. These conditions have shown a marked increase over the past 12 years:
• The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy increased by 89 percent.
• The frequency of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) increased by 25 percent.
• The incidence of glaucoma increased by 22 percent.
• The number of people affected by cataracts increased by 19 percent.[ii]
As baby-boomers continue to age, the incidence of age-related eye disease is also expected to continue to increase. Currently, people age 80 and older constitute only 8 percent of the population, but account for 69 percent of all cases of blindness.[iii] Early detection and treatment by an ophthalmologist – an eye medical doctor – may help prevent and in some cases, such as cataracts, even reverse vision loss.

Many seniors age 65 and older may qualify for an eye exam and up to 1 year of care at no out-of-pocket-cost through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. EyeCare America matches qualifying patients age 65 and older with an ophthalmologist who provides a comprehensive medical eye examination. EyeCare America is co-sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc, with additional support from Alcon. To see if you or a loved one is eligible, visit the online referral center at www.eyecareamerica.org.

“Regular eye exams are imperative to detect and treat eye diseases and prevent serious vision loss,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., chairman of EyeCare America. “This is especially true for people age 65 and older who are at increased risk for eye diseases. That’s why EyeCare America is so focused on providing access to eye care, and we hope that fewer people will suffer from preventable causes of blindness as a result.”

To learn more about EyeCare America or to find out if you or a loved one qualifies for the program, visit www.eyecareamerica.org. Learn more about eye diseases and conditions, and keeping your eyes healthy at www.geteyesmart.org.

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology
The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons – Eye M.D.s – with more than 32,000 members worldwide. Eye health care is provided by the three “O’s” – ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians. It is the ophthalmologist, or Eye M.D., who can treat it all: eye diseases, infections and injuries, and perform eye surgery. For more information, visit www.aao.org. The Academy’s EyeSmart® public education program educates the public about the importance of eye health and empowers them to preserve their healthy vision, by providing the most trustworthy and medically accurate information about eye diseases, conditions and injuries. Visit www.geteyesmart.org to learn more.

About EyeCare America
Established in 1985, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is committed to the preservation of sight, accomplishing its mission through public service and education. EyeCare America provides year-round eye care services to medically underserved seniors and those at increased risk for eye disease through its corps of nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to serving their communities. More than 90 percent of the care made available is provided at no out-of-pocket cost to the patients. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped more than 1.7 million people. More information can be found at: www.eyecareamerica.org.

Renown Health Board Member and Volunteer Recognized with NHA Awards

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Lawson Fox, Renown Health board member, and Dinah O’Brien, Renown Health volunteer, were presented with awards at the Nevada Hospital Association (NHA) annual Membership Meeting Awards Luncheon late last week at the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe. Fox received the Award for Trustee Excellence and O’Brien receive the Excellence in Volunteerism Award.

The two awards recognize one urban hospital and one rural hospital trustee and volunteer who have made an exemplary commitment to his/her hospital and contributions to improve his/her hospital’s service to its patients and community. Since their establishment, these awards have recognized a number of distinguished health care leaders throughout Nevada.

Fox has served on Renown Health boards for more than 8 years. During his tenure, he has overseen the implementation of quality tracking mechanisms for delivering quality care in the emergency departments of Renown Regional, Renown South Meadows Medical Center and the health network in general. In addition, his efforts of monitoring employee survey data have helped to provide consistent exceptional patient experiences.

O’Brien has been the volunteer coordinator of the Pet Therapy Program at Renown Health since the Healing Arts Program began more than 16 years ago. She is also a Volunteer Patient Visitor, a program that began in September of 2011 designed to empower volunteers to help with the patient experience.
In addition, she considers her years at the main reception desk at Renown Regional among her most significant contributions.

“Lawson and Dinah’s support throughout the community is truly a gift to northern Nevada. They are tremendous assets here at Renown,” said Jim Miller, president and CEO of Renown Health. “These honors are well deserved and both Lawson and Dinah should be commended for the genuine difference they have made and the many lives they have touched.”

In addition to individual awards, both Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center received NHA awards for quality. These awards mean medical professionals working at Renown South Meadows and Renown Regional provided treatment known to get the best results for patients.

Formally established in 1960 and incorporated in 1971, the Nevada Hospital Association (NHA) is a not-for-profit, statewide trade association representing 100 percent of Nevada’s acute care hospitals along with psychiatric, rehabilitation and other specialty hospitals as well as health-related agencies and organizations throughout the state. Allied with the American Hospital Association, NHA is an independent organization headquartered in Reno, Nevada. As a membership organization, NHA serves as a statewide resource and leader in promoting public understanding of, and support for, the health care system serving Nevada’s communities. In addition, NHA serves its members by providing education, information and representation and by serving as a catalyst in collaborative efforts to produce quality, adequately financed health care in Nevada.

Introducing the Circle of Life Hospice Foundation Thrift and Gift Boutique Theater

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General, Press-Media Releases 

Circle of Life Hospice Foundation Thrift and Gift Boutique Theater

Established in the Fall of 1999, Circle of Life Hospice seeks to become one of Nevada’s most respected human services organizations. Their aim is to assist patients with their human needs, their relationship with those they love, their greater power, their spirit and themselves.

It is the cause of the Circle of Life Hospice Foundation, the non-profit “sister” organization to the Circle of Life Hospice, to raise funds through charitable giving and charitable events necessary to improve end-of-life care through research, education, services and facilities that would otherwise be unavailable. Circle of Life Hospice Foundation is grounded in the belief that life and death are but one. Death is a natural part of life and as with any part of life, dying is a time for love, personal growth and healing. Because of the nature of hospice care, these efforts have been primarily focused on those who are terminally ill and the loved ones who support them. It is the goal of the Circle of Life Hospice Foundation to extend the services and philosophy provided in hospice care to the entire community.

The Circle of Life Hospice Foundation Thrift and Gift is a not-for-profit 501C3 tax exempt organization devoted to providing information, education, and conscientious conversation on hospice and other mind-body-spirit healing services within our community and throughout the world. It is the vision of Founder Deb Girard, and with assistance from Gayle Johnson, Director of Operations, to equip Northern Nevada with a comfortable way for loved ones to let go of “gently used” belongings of those who have passed. Revenue generated by the resale of such items will be given directly back to the community through coordination with other local support services. Additionally, the Circle of Life Hospice Foundation Thrift and Gift Boutique Theatre is a community center hosting a local artists’ gallery, a gathering place for intentional social interaction, theatrical educational performances and health resource classes.

Learn how you can help with goods, services, volunteer opportunities, and your tax deductible donations by calling 775-622-1759 or visit the website www.colgift.org

Online press release:  http://www.pr.com/press-release/443442

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

September 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, General 

City Of Las Vegas October 2012 – Recreation, Adaptive Recreation, Sports & Community Special Events

All activities are subject to change. For links to facilities, programs, classes and activities in the current Beyond the Neon guide, go online to www.lasvegasnevada.gov/Find/recreation.htm. Most activities require advance registration. Register today to build your healthy lifestyle! Most facilities are closed Oct. 26 for holiday observance.

Ward 5 Coffee With The Councilman
Thursday, Oct. 4, 9 to 10 a.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Starbucks, 751 N. Rancho Drive, at Bonanza Road.
Join Ward 5 Councilman Ricki Y. Barlow for coffee and conversation about your ideas to improve Ward 5 and Las Vegas.

Ward 4 Walk & Roll For ALS (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 6 a.m. registration. 5K begins 8 a.m., Walk begins 8:15 a.m.
Cost: $25 minimum donation to participate in walk; $35 for runners ages 18+; $25 runners ages 5-17; free for under age 5.
Police Memorial Park, 3250 Metro Academy Way, at Cheyenne Avenue.
Sign up your team at http://als.kintera.org/WalknRoll. Call (702) 777-0500 for more information.

Ward 2 Trunk or Treat Car Show and Free Kid’s Halloween Festival (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public. There is a fee for vendors and car show participants.
Veterans Memorial Leisure Services Center, 101 N. Pavilion Center Drive, (702) 229-1100.
Please join Councilman Bob Beers for a fun day filled with music provided by DJ Brando, along with Halloween activities for the kids, including craft projects, costume contest, games, face painting and jump houses. Kids have the opportunity to “trunk or treat” at the cars decorated for Halloween in the car show. Help pick the spookiest! All makes, models and years welcome in the car show. Vendors are welcome. The event is sponsored by Ward 2 Councilman Bob Beers.

Contact John Bear at 229-2420 or e-mail to jbear@lasvegasnevada.gov, if you want to register your car in the show, become a vendor at the event, or volunteer to help. Early registration for the car show is $25 and is due by Thursday, Oct. 4. You also can register a car in the car show on the event date for $35. The vendor fee is $25, which includes a table.
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Free Ward 6 Shredding Event
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive.
Bring your documents that need to be shredded. Complimentary shredding takes place in the Centennial Hills Community Center Active Adult Center parking lot. Limit of five boxes per vehicle. This is a safe and convenient way to get rid of old documents.

Movie at the E! (all ages)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Enjoy a family movie in the plaza. This will be a perfect chance for the family to relax and enjoy a safe and special night under the stars. Bring low folding chairs for your comfort.

E! Club (ages 6-13)
Friday, Oct. 19, 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 per child.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern Avenue, (702) 229-1515.
Parents can enjoy a night on the town while children enjoy a fun evening of activities.

Ward 1 Trunk or Treat (all ages)
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Anthem Institute Parking Lot, 2320 S. Rancho Drive, at Sahara Avenue.
Enjoy a community celebration with trick-or-treating, jump house and more, hosted by Anthem Institute and co-sponsored by the city of Las Vegas.

Howling Halloween Carnival (all ages)
Thursday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission.
Doolittle Community Center, 1950 N. J St., (702) 229-6374.
There will be a costume contest, games, drawings and candy for the kids. There will also be a Haunted Hallway designed to frighten all who enter.

Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Tournament
Friday-Sunday, Oct. 26-28.
Free for spectators. Advance registration required for teams.
Bettye Wilson Soccer Complex, 7353 Eugene Ave., and other parks.
For teams ages 8-15. This soccer tournament is co-hosted by the city of Las Vegas and the Downtown Las Vegas Soccer Club. This top-ranked event drew teams from 11 different states, as well as Canada and Mexico last year. Teams are guaranteed three games. Individual awards are offered for 1st and 2nd place. The entry fee is only $515 for U8-U10 and $735 for U11-U15. Entry deadline is Sept. 6. For more information, go online to www.lvmayorscup.com.
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Adaptive Recreation

Leisure Connection (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Leisure Connection is a social group. Community outings are planned each month to assist high-functioning adults with social skills and independence in the community. Activities include bowling, movies, lunch/dinner outings, sports events and leisure education classes. Call (702) 229-5177 to be placed on the activity schedule mailing list or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov.

New A.G.E. (ages 22+ with developmental disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Closed staff development days and holidays.
Cost: $21 for 1-3 days; $28 for 4 days; $35 for 5 days each week.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call (702) 229-5177 or e-mail jwinder@lasvegasnevada.gov for registration packet and more information. The program offers a variety of activities and special events that promote individuality, self-esteem and independence.

Wheelchair Athletes Open Gym (high school-adult)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., through December.
Fee: $2 per practice.
Fremont Middle School Gymnasium, 1100 E. Saint Louis Ave.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Lorenzi Adaptive Recreation Program (ages 7-21 with disabilities)
Monday-Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Closed Oct. 12, 26.
Cost: $27 for 1-3 days; $36 for 4 days; $45 for 5 days, per person.
East Las Vegas Community Senior Center, 250 N. Eastern Ave., (702) 229-1515.
Participants enjoy a new recreation experience every week, community outings, sports, games, arts and crafts, swimming, movies, friends, and all around fun. Contact Andrea Anzalone at 229-4903 or 229-6358 for information and to register.

Adaptive Cycle Club (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 6, 9 to 11 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Cost: $2 per person.
Wayne Bunker Family Park, 7351 W. Alexander Road, at Tenaya Way.
Call (702) 229-4796 to reserve your spot in the early or late session. Adaptive cycles provided.

Helter Skelter Quad Rugby Tournament
Oct. 12-14, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.
Free for spectators.
Dula Gymnasium, 441 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6307.
Six teams from across North America will compete for medals for first through third place. Teams will include: Las Vegas Sin City Skulls; Northern California Quake; Sierra Strom from Reno/Sacramento; University of Arizona Wildcats; Boise Idaho Bombers; and the Ottawa Stingers from Canada. Spectators are welcome. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for more information.
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20th Annual Disability Awareness Day (all ages)
Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Free admission and lunch.
Pioneer Park, 7449 Braswell Drive.
Attend a free “Work Incentives Seminar on Ticket to Work & Employment for SSI/SSDI Beneficiaries Age 14 to 64.” This seminar will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in conjunction with Disability Awareness Day. Also enjoy live entertainment, a free wheelchair safety check and a free lunch. Call (702) 889-4216 to reserve your space.

Free Paralympic Sport Activity Nights (kindergarten-grade 12)
Wednesday, Oct. 17, 5 to 8 p.m.
Rancho High School, 1900 Searles Ave.
Register at main school entrance. Call (702) 229-4796 or e-mail jfoster@lasvegasnevada.gov for additional information and locations.

Quad Rugby Team Practice (high school-adult)
Friday, Oct. 19, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Minker Sports Complex, 275 N. Mojave Road, (702) 229-6563.
Call (702) 229-4796 for additional information.

Cultural Arts – September 2012 Calendar Of Events

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Cultural Arts – September 2012 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 July 26, 2012
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Centers will be closed Monday, Sept. 3, for holiday observance.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Cost: $4 dollars per person per week. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of international fun learning Armenian, Bulgarian, Israeli, Arabic, Macedonian, Russian, Greek, Turkish, Chinese and Serbian folk dances, and more. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call 229-6383.

Afternoon Delight Tea Dances (adults)
Thursdays, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 general admission per person. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Great music and a friendly atmosphere welcome dancers of all levels to the center’s beautiful ballroom dance floor. Loy Au will lead the dance instruction and demonstrations for new dances each week. A themed dance will be featured each month. Invite your friends and bring snacks to share. For more information, call 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Cost: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – Crystal Bookmark Award Nominations
Aug. 13-Sept. 21.
The Vegas Valley Book Festival launches its annual awards project to honor a local individual and an organization for advancing the cause of literature in the Las Vegas Valley. Nominations from the public are requested Aug. 13-Sept. 21. Nominations can be submitted online at www.vegasvalleybookfestival.org, or call (702) 229-5431 for a nomination form. The deadline for submittal is 5 p.m. Sept. 21. Nominees must reside in Southern Nevada. The two awards will be presented at the festival at 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, p.m. in the auditorium of the Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. Fourth St.
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Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturday, Sept. 1, 15. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $10 adults; $5 members, students and military; $3 children under 16 and non-dancing adults. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to the live music of an acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families are welcomed. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “Create an Artist’s Sketchbook” (ages 3-12)
Sept. 1-2; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m.
Programs are free with paid admission. $10 for adults; $8 for seniors, military and children 12 and over; $5 for ages 3-11; free for children 2 and under.
Las Vegas Natural History Museum, 900 Las Vegas Blvd. N., 384-3466.
In this workshop inspired by the famed book series, “Dinotopia,” written and illustrated by James Gurney, kids ages 3-12 can create an imagined dinosaur utopia using watercolors and sketchbooks. Paleontology experts will answer questions on Saturday.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “Smart Chicks Kick It Tour” (ages 13+)
Tuesday, Sept. 11, 7 to 9 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Shakespeare Las Vegas, Reed Whipple Cultural Center, 821 Las Vegas Blvd. North.
Seven best-selling young adult authors stop in Las Vegas as part of their six-city tour of North America. Authors Kelley Armstrong, Melissa Marr, Rachel Caine, Kim Derting, Kami Garcia, Richelle Mead and Veronica Roth will read excerpts from their own works, followed by a spirited question-and-answer session, book signings and reception. Call 229-5431 for more information.

Vegas Valley Book Festival Pre-Festival Event – “The First Lady of Las Vegas” (all ages)
Saturday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Cost: $1 for ages 13+; free for ages 12 and younger.
Old Las Vegas Mormon Fort State Historic Park, 500 E. Washington Ave., (702) 486-3511.
Nevada author Carrie Townley Porter talks about the life of the pioneer heroine who helped found our city — and signs her book, “Helen J. Stewart: The First Lady of Las Vegas.”

Downtown Cultural Series – The Sweet Potatoes (all ages)
Friday, Sept. 21, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy this noontime concert. The Sweet Potatoes play original, acoustic Americana- style music with a fresh twist. This trio will bring a smile to your face with their sweet harmonies and finely crafted songwriting. Call (702) 229-3515 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. For more information on the band, visit http://thesweetpotatoes.com/.

The Poets’ Corner
Hosted by Keith Brantley
Friday, Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
A monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants, featuring the best local poetry talent.
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USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Sept 22, 7 to 11 p.m.; dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 for USA Dance members, military, and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Cosponsored by the USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national organization USA Dance. USA Dance Las Vegas is a volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. Call (702) 813-6694 or (702) 229-6383 for more information, or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org. Pay at the door.

Community Artist Series: Mohummed-Rafee Shakir “Shamanic Syntax”
Saturday, Sept. 29, 3 p.m.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Mohummed-Rafee Shakir provides an unusual opportunity for audience members to connect with the mysteries of the ancient world through a variety of artistic mediums within an environment of “sacred sound.” The concept of “sacred sound” is a reference to the concept that vibration is the underlying connective force of the universe.

Pride & Prejudice and Zombies English Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, Sept 29, 7 to 10 p.m.
Cost: $10 adults; $5 members, students and military; $3 children under 16 and non-dancing adults. Pay at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Featuring a combination of English and Scottish dances and more. Costumes are encouraged, but not required. Caller Marsden Macrae leads a program that is enlivened by her vast knowledge of the history, historical setting and social customs of each dance. Only a brief reminder of choreography will be available, prior to the start of each dance. Attendees can gain a familiarity of the dances by attending dance sessions that are available before Sept 29. For more information, call 656-9513 or 229-6383, or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org. Cosponsored by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Exhibitions

“You are Here” Exhibition (all ages)
Artist David Lindsay
June 29-Sept. 1; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Arts Center Gallery, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
David Lindsay grew up in the San Francisco bay area. After high school, he lived in northern Italy for two years. Although his purpose was not to study art, he could not help but be influenced by the art and architecture of that country. The influence of Italian painting and architecture can be seen in his work, but in a combination that is unique and creative. His work has been exhibited all over the United States, as well as in Italy and Romania. He currently is working on projects for venues in Las Vegas, Texas, Germany and Italy.

“Celebrating Life! 2012 Winners Circle” (all ages)
July 26-Sept. 6, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Enjoy this collection of award-winning pieces from the annual juried exhibit for adults 50 and better that takes place each spring.
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“Νeothta” (Youth)
Aug. 23-Oct. 27, by appointment only and during artists’ reception.
Meet-the-Artists reception Aug. 23, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. 4th St.
A selection of artists explore idealistic images of children. Call (702) 229-1012 for more information.

“Object Illusion”
Artist Joanne Vuillemot.
Aug. 30-Nov. 15, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Terrace Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
This local artist and educator will exhibit her silver and mixed-media metalwork.

“Mountains and Valleys Without End”
Artist Daniel Gottsegen
Sept. 7-Nov. 21; Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The artist’s experience working in and studying the environment from both a scientific (naturalist) and personal orientation has shaped the way he considers (and constructs) his world and his work. He is interested in the tension and duality between our romantic conceptions of nature and the reality of the potential environmental calamities we are facing. He seeks to embody this tension in his work by the use of technology (video that he shoots) to derive image sources, or in recent work (the Wanderungen series) by juxtaposing images. For more information on the gallery program call (702) 229-1012.

Hispanic-American Heritage Exhibit
Sept. 13-Oct. 11, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Meet-the-Artists reception Sept. 13.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.

“Absolutly Abstract”* *Editor’s Note: Spelling of exhibit name is correct as listed.
Artist Thurman Hackett
Sept. 15-Nov. 17, Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Meet-the-Artist Reception: Saturday, Sept. 22, 3 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
After spending 25 years as an interior designer, Thurman Hackett came to realize his artistic talent. He began to find new freedoms of expression through painting. As years passed, Hackett developed his own style of abstract painting. Although his subjects relate to American and African history, American jazz artists and automobiles of the 1940s, this show focuses on Africa.

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Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

Seniors Citizens are a high priority in Washoe County

Washoe County is experiencing a rapid demographic shift because of the aging of the “baby boom” generation. Like every community in America, we are evaluating how to provide services to the most vulnerable seniors.
 After an April 2, 2012 presentation by Washoe County Senior Services WCSS), the Joint Meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, Reno City Council, Sparks City Council and Washoe County School District Board of Trustees requested that the Department prepare a report on the cost and benefit of increased funding.
 The Department offers both a $1.2 million and $2.4 million option.
 Please ask your elected officials, in-person, by letter or e-mail, and in testimony at public hearings to support the proposal. The following is a summary:

Washoe County, like all of the United States, is seeing the “Baby Boomers” turn 60 in unprecedented numbers. This demographic shift is having a dramatic impact on seniors, families and our community.
 The senior population is growing faster than any other segment of the Washoe County community; 25% are now over 55, with the age group 55-64 years absorbing 27.3% of all County population growth over the last decade.
Washoe County Senior Services (WCSS) is not able to meet the needs of the rapidly growing number of vulnerable seniors.
 Today, Washoe County Senior Services assists only 8% of the more than 71,000 County residents over the age of 60. We are forecast to have as many as 93,000 over 60 by 2016.
 The Washoe County Senior Center, 9th and Sutro, is 34 years old, and over half of its Meals on Wheels delivery vehicles are over 10 years old.
 In 1985, when voters approved the $.01 Senior Citizens ad valorem Fund in perpetuity, it was believed to be adequate for all future facility, program and service needs. Because of increasing costs, the addition of essential programs and above all, population growth, this is no longer true.
 Almost all Washoe County Senior Services programs have a waiting list.
Washoe County Senior Services helps “Bend the Curve” of health and long term care costs by keeping seniors active, involved and independent.
 Planning to prepare the community for an aging society; leverage new resources.
 Senior Centers operated in partnership with cities and GID that provide classes, activities and events; volunteer opportunities.
 Congregate Meals at 8 locations in senior centers and public housing.
 Outreach and early intervention programs to connect seniors to services as early as possible.
 “Help Line” – Aging and Disability Resource Center – provides information, advice and counseling about health and long term care.
 Social Services, including case management, nursing, Home Delivered Meals and in-home care for the most vulnerable.
 Senior Law for legal matters including advance directives, public benefits appeals, elder law, and housing counseling.
 DayBreak Adult Day is an alternate to nursing home care.
Seniors and their families need help managing the maze of services and choices; many seniors are not able to pay for the services they need
 Almost every Washoe County family will be faced with providing care for aging parents and relatives. Most are not prepared.
 In a 2006 Washoe County needs assessment, only 34% of all seniors said that they could afford to pay for their own care.
WCSS low cost supportive services reduce public expenses by keeping people healthier, longer, supporting independent living in their homes and by delaying or preventing institutionalization. The additional funding would provide services and reduce other costs:
 Congregate Meal sites and Senior Centers
• 20% of the 2,100 seniors report that it is their only meal of the day.
• Site managers, which were eliminated in previous budget cuts, would be restored for all meal sites.
• Provide clerical and social work support for senior centers.
 WCSS “Help Line” provides counseling on long term care and health care options, empowering seniors to make an informed choice on decisions that affect their entire family.
• Expert information, advice and counseling would be available to an additional 5,500 seniors and family members per year.
 Case management and visiting nurse
• An additional 350 seniors would receive medication management, help with medical professionals and an in-home nursing assessment.
• An additional 600 seniors would be assisted by a case manager to coordinate care and arrange for services.
• An additional 400 low-income seniors would get in-home services, such as home care, personal care and escorted transportation that are not available elsewhere.
 Home Delivered Meals provides 1/3 of the USDA Recommended Daily Allowance to homebound seniors, who cannot prepare their own meals.
• Today, 175 (37%) of WCSS current HDM case load need assistance in 2 or more Activities of Daily Living (ADLs – bathing, dressing, eating, toileting, etc.) and receive additional case management, nursing and in-home care. They have received services for at least one year.
• New funding would serve an additional 300 homebound seniors per year; provide an additional 70,000 meals per year, for a total of 180,000.
• Additional funding would help an additional 400 high risk clients
 Senior Law: Provide legal services to an additional 400 people.
 DayBreak Adult Day Health: An additional 10 low-income seniors will get services.
• The annual cost for a DayBreak client is $11,000. Nevada Medicaid Nursing Home cost for the same senior is about $59,000 per year; an annual savings of $48,000 per year, and total potential annual savings of $3.48 million.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Southwest Medical

November 5, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care 

http://www.smalv.com/

NSG_AugSeptOct2016_Web-38

NSG_AugSeptOct2016_Web-39

About Us

YESTERDAY Southwest Medical Associates (SMA)  traces its beginnings back to 1972, when Anthony M. Marlon, MD first established  a private medical practice in Las Vegas. His goal? To provide compassionate and  innovative health care services. Because of his vision, his small practice  quickly grew. Today, we’re one of Nevada’s largest multispecialty medical  groups. And, although we’ve grown, we haven’t lost sight of our original  commitment –  to provide our patients with comprehensive, affordable  medical care.

AND TODAY We’re dedicated to providing you with the  best health care possible. Our advanced technological capabilities and  state-of-the-art equipment, combined with our passion for people, makes us the  right choice for you and your family. With decades of experience and over 13  specialties and programs, SMA is the trusted name in health care in the Las  Vegas Valley.

Our Community

SERVICE. KNOWLEDGE. COMMITMENT. We  have a long history of community service and philanthropy.     Whether it’s in collaboration with the Boy Scouts of America, the  College of Southern Nevada Foundation, the Human Rights Campaign, the March of  Dimes and the United Way, or through our employees, we’re helping individuals,  families and communities live healthier lives.

By giving our  time, talents and financial resources, we hope to advance health, education and  well-being.

Our Volunteer  Program offers the opportunity to learn about the medical field or give back to  the community while helping someone in need.

University of  Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) School of Nursing Grant will be used to fund two  graduate fellowships in the Master of Nursing (MSN) program and two graduate  fellowships in the Doctor of Nursing (Ph.D.) program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Need for Senior Living Jobs (Nevada Senior Guide)

August 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

For people currently looking at different career options, there are several things that you need to weigh. You need to pursue a career that you will thoroughly enjoy doing, that will allow you to help people, and that will pay you a decent amount of money. Senior living jobs are fall under all those categories, and they are in very high demand. There is expected to be a shortage of those working in the elderly healthcare industry, making it something that high school and college students should consider.

There are plenty of different types of senior living jobs, some that don’t require any schooling after high school, to those that require a Masters degree or a Doctorate degree. In other words, you can essentially decide how much time you want to spend in school and choose your career helping seniors accordingly. Or, you can go to convalescent homes and apartments, as well as assisted living communities, and volunteer. You will be able to get a lot of experience working with the elderly, and they will enjoy the company quite a bit.

One of the best parts of working with the elderly, in fact, is how much that they enjoy the company of others. There are very few industries quite like the senior healthcare industry in that respect. The people that you are helping will be so happy to see you and so thankful for you every day. If that isn’t enough to help sway your decision though, you will be happy to learn that the average salary of those in the senior living industry is between $40,000 and $60,000. That is not a bad amount of money to make at all, especially in the current economy, where jobs are scarce.

The other benefit to senior living jobs is the fact that you will be able to make your own schedule. Since there is a need for people working every hour of every day, that gives you a lot of flexibility with regards to when you will work. If you are someone that does not like the idea of working Monday through Friday from eight in the morning until five at night, then this is definitely something you should think about. In the end, you will find the senior healthcare industry to be a very rewarding road to go down.

Click here to check out the available senior living jobs in your area and what they pay.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_J_Sinclair

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5498593

Nevada-Senior-Guide Volunteer Opportunities – Rural Nevada

Nevada Rural Counties RSVP Inc.

2621 Northgate Lane, Suite 6

Carson City, NV 89706, 775-687-4680

tcausey@rsvp.carson-city.nv.us

www.nevadaruralrsvp.org

 

Nevada SMP – Senior Medicare Patrol

(702) 486-4341, Please call for information

 

Senior Companion Program of

Northern Nevada

1380 Greg Street, Ste. 212, Sparks, NV  89431

775-358-2322, Mary Brock, Director

Lyon, Churchill, Douglas & Carson County

Nevada-Senior-Guide Transportation and Errands Services Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

Hawthorne Senior Center – Mineral County

975 K St., Hawthorne, NV 89415

775-945-5519. Local and out of town trips

Fannie Komp Senior Center – Eureka County

728 7th Street, Crescent Valley, NV 89821

(775) 468-0466. Transportation

 

Lincoln Senior Center

775-728-4477. Transportation to medical

appointments and other errands

 

Silver Sage Senior Center

Wells, NV, (775) 752-3280. Transportation,                          Doctor, Post office, Clinic, Local shopping

 

Transportation Assistance

Churchill County SR Center Volunteer Program

(775) 428-2988 Cart Program

OR (775) 423-7096

Arranges for transportation services, runs

errands, local medical appointments.

7am – 4pm

 

White Pine Nutrition Center

1000 Compton St., Ely, NV 89301

(775) 289-2742

Medical van to appointments out of town

Nevada-Senior-Guide Support Groups – Rural Nevada

Alzheimer’s Support Group

Meets at Humboldt General Hospital –

118 E Haskell St. Winnemucca, NV

Quiet Room @ Noon. 2nd Wednesday of every month.   Call Humboldt Volunteer Hospice for  further information. (775) 625-4263 Sheryl

 

Churchill County Senior Center

310 E. Court St., Fallon, NV 89406

775-423-7096. Caregivers group meets 1st
Wednesday of month.

 

Grief Relief Group

Meets at Humboldt General Hospital –

118 E Haskell St. Winnemucca, NV

(775) 625-4263. Quiet Room @ 6 PM. 3rd                               Thursday of every month. Call Humboldt
Volunteer Hospice for further information.

National Kidney Foundation

415-543-3303. Patient Info Help Line:

855-653-2273. San Francisco, CA

Office 8am-5pm

Handles Northern Nevada. Information, Referrals

Nevada-Senior-Guide Multiple Services – Rural Nevada

Humboldt Volunteer Hospice

P.O. Box 843, 705 E Fourth St.

Winnemucca, NV 89446

775-625-4263. In Home Care, Case
Management, Community Networking

 

Senior Companion Program of N. Nevada

& Elvirita Lewis Respite Voucher Program

1380 Greg Street, Ste. 212, Sparks, NV  89431

775-358-2322, Mary Brock, Director

 

Sierra Senior Services

10040 Estates Dr., Truckee, NV 96160

(530) 550-7600 Nevada County (CA)

SierraSeniors.org. Also Incline Village NV

Nutrition program, Meals on wheels, Info                             & Referrals. Outreach & Support. Music, Pet              therapy, Congregate meals – noon. Need to                           RSVP ahead of time M-F.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Medical and Health Services Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

City of Pioche – County Social Services
Information

(775) 728-4477 Lincoln County

www.co.lincoln.nv.us

Provides various essential programs, services,  benefits to assist qualified, needy families,  individuals achieve their highest level of
self-sufficiency, Transportation

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability
Services Agency – Northern Nevada

(775) 688-2964 Washoe County

Elder Protective Services for persons 60 years

old and older who may experience abuse,

neglect, exploitation, or isolation. Elder

Protective Services serves all of Nevada

 

Eureka Senior Center

20 W. Gold Street, Eureka NV 89316

(775) 237-5597
www.co.eureka.nv.us/county/senior.htm

Referral Services for Low Income Energy

Assistance, USDA, and Medicare

Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribe Senior Center

1885 Agency Rd., Fallon, NV 89406

(775) 423-7569 Churchill County

www.fpst.org/programs/seniorcenter.htm

Offers meals, trips, traditional crafts, and

other cultural events, caregivers, food bank,

national relief charities program

Kids to Seniors Korner – Saint Mary’s

Community Wellness, Community

Based Outreach

(775) 770-6177 Washoe County

www.saintmarysreno.com

Kids to Seniors Korner assists vulnerable                           individuals and families, with special
emphasis on homeless children and seniors,                          by linking and providing them with community               resources through a collaborative community                    partnership to increase quality of life 8am-5pm

Lyon County Human Services

1075 Pyramid St., Silver Springs, NV 89429

(775) 577-5009 Lyon County

www.lyon-county.org

All emergency services, Senior Services,

Low Income, Employment. 8am-5pm

 

Nevada Rural Counties Retired & Senior                              Volunteer Program (RSVP)

Pahrump, Amargosa, Beatty, Crystal

2621 Northgate Lane, #6

Carson City, NV 89701

775-687-4680, treebanks@pahrump.com

RSVP Program provides free local transportation                           to doctors, shopping, bank, Respite Care,     Caregiver Program (4 hours at a time), Pro                           Bono Legal Services, Resistance Exercise

Training, Coupons for Farmers Market
(Call program director for information)

 

NYE/Esmerelda County Community

Health Nursing

1 Frankee St., Tonopah, NV 89049

(775) 482-6659. Referral Service, Immunization
flu shots, counseling for women’s/men’s
health, cancer screening

 

RSVP Program – NV Rural Counties

Homemaker Companions, Donations Welcome

Senior Daybreak Program

Washoe County Senior Services

(775) 328-2575 Washoe County

www.co.washoe.nv.us/seniorsrv

Daycare for adults age 18 years or older as
alternative to institutionalization, Provides                        respite care, nursing, day care and social
opportunities for the disabled adult,

Offers group care during the day

 

Senior ID Card – Douglas Cty Nevada TRIAD

(775) 782-9858 Douglas County

This card is wallet size and should be carried                     at all times. It contains information that could
save your life in case of an emergency.
CARE TRAK Program.

 

The Continuum Outreach Program

Nevada Care Connection Partner

3700 Grant Dr., Ste A, Reno, NV 89509

(775) 829-4700 Washoe County

www.thecontinuum-reno.com

Adult day care, therapy and rehab

 

Douglas County Nevada TRIAD

Dementia/Senior and Elderly Services

The Evacuation Disaster Program

(775) 782-9858 Douglas County

For those who live alone or are disabled:
in the event of a disaster and would not be                           able to evacuate without assistance. This                  program signs you up for immediate
assistance to come to your aid in the event                            an evacuation request is issued.

Contact for Magnet that holds health info.

 

Washoe County Senior Services Law Project

1155 E. 9th St., Reno, NV 89512

(775) 334-3050 Washoe County

Assists seniors of Washoe County with
Social security, supplemental security income,                   Medicare, food stamps, county assistance,                                 public housing and Foreclosure Info.

Call for hours. 60+

WEARC Program (Waiver for the Elderly in

Adult Residential Care)

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability
Services Agency – Northern Nevada

(775) 688-2964 Carson City County
www.nvaging.net

A home and community based waiver for                  the elderly in group care that offers individuals                   a less expensive alternative to supervised                              care in a residential setting

Nevada-Senior-Guide Legal and Lifeline Assistance Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

City of Sparks – Police Department

1701 E. Prater Way, Sparks, NV 89434

(775) 353-2248 Front Desk
(775) 353-2231 Non-Emergency

www.cityofsparks.us

The idea behind the Sparks Senior Phone Patrol
is to place a phone call each day to check on the
welfare of senior citizens who live alone.

 

Guardian Program – Douglas County

Nevada TRIAD. (775) 782-9858

This is a computerized telephone system   designed to stay in touch with the elderly
on a daily basis, call for paperwork

 

Hawthorne Senior Center

975 K St., Hawthorne, NV 89415

775-945-5519. Care law free attorney

program. Call for appointment.

 

Nevada Attorney General

100 N. Carson St., Carson City, NV 89701

(775) 684-1100, Call for assistance regarding:

Bureau of Customer Protection

Report Fraud, Medicaid

 

Nevada Rural Counties Retired and Senior                           Volunteer Prgm (RSVP) – Carson City County

2621 Northgate Lane #6, Carson City, NV 89701

Nevada Rural Counties (RSVP)

CARE Law Program

(775) 687-4680 Carson City County – Main

(775) 423-7096 Churchill County

(775) 482-6690 Esmeralda County

(877) 237-5133 Eureka County

(775) 304-0757 Humboldt County

(775) 635-5816 Lander County

(775) 726-3126 Lincoln County

(775) 945-5908 Mineral County

(775) 751-5282 Nye County

(775) 273-7623 Pershing County

(775) 342-0264 Storey County

(775) 289-6323 White Pine County

www.nevadaruralrsvp.org

The RSVP CARE Law Program provides
pro-bono legal services for low income and                         homebound seniors in Nevada. The CARE Law
Program focuses on providing estate
planning, including durable powers of
attorney, wills, guardianship and probate issues.                                Ride Program.

 

State of Nevada – Division of Aging Services

1010 Ruby Vista Dr., Suite 104, Elko, NV 89803

(775) 738-1966

Long/Short Term Care, EPS Program, Grants                      Program, Referral Program, Home and

community base care

Nevada-Senior-Guide Education Services Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

Washoe County Library System

(775) 327-8300, www.washoecountylibrary.us

Your public library is the place for print and electronic resources, literacy and cultural

programs, group technology classes, and
personal research assistance. We have 12 physical libraries and once virtual library,  please visit us online for information on hours and locations. www.washoe.lib.nv.us

Resource Lending Center – Churchill

County Club 60 Senior Center

310 E. Court, Fallon, NV 89406

(775) 423-7096, ext. 22. Provides info and  topic literature, books, assistive aids

Sanford Center for Aging – UNR

(775) 784-4774 Washoe County

1664 N. Virginia St., Mail Stop 146

Center for Molecular Medicine, Reno, NV 89557

www.unr.edu/sanford

Develops innovative ideas, educational and
research opportunities, and community
partnerships. A scholarship program and                              Continuing Education Workshops are available,                      SR Outreach, Volunteers, RSVP Program

Nevada-Senior-Guide Chore Services and Home Maintenance Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

Churchill County Senior Center Volunteer Program

310 E. Court St., Fallon, NV 89406

(775) 423-7096, Ext. 22 Churchill County

Meals on Wheels, Lunch M-F 11am, Socials, Blood Pressure Support Group each month for caregivers, CART Program, Lite house keeping

 

Community Home-Based Initiative Program

(CHIP) – Carson City

State of Nevada – Aging & Disability

Services Agency – Northern Nevada

(775) 687-4210 Carson City County

(775) 738-1966 Elko County

(775) 688-2964 Washoe County

www.nvaging.net

Homemaker services, Rx, Elder Abuse

 

Eureka Senior Center

20 West Gold Street, Eureka, NV 89316

(775) 237-5597 Eureka County

www.co.eureka.nv.us/county/senior.htm

Lunch for homebound, energy assistance,

paperwork assistance, Lunch Mon – Fri – Noon

Nevada-Senior-Guide Volunteer Opportunities Directory – Southern Nevada

American Diabetes Foundation

702-369-9995, www.diabetes.org/volunteer

Blind Center of Nevada

(702) 642-6000, Call for info

 

Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada

702-382-0721.

Opportunities available for volunteers

 

Clark County Library District

(702) 734-7323 – Looking for volunteers

 

Comfort Hospice Care

6655 W. Sahara, #B 114, LV, NV 89146

Contact – Debbie Gregory. Volunteers to work                  with terminally ill patients and their families

 

DISCOVERY Children’s Museum

(702) 382-3445

www.DiscoveryKids.org

Volunteers help on the museum floor

during school tours and other fun-filled

museum events. Volunteers can also provide                        mentoring and tutoring to our teenage

volunteers. Hrs: 10am-5pm, Sun Noon-5pm

 

Family Home Hospice

8655 S. Eastern, Las Vegas, NV 89123

(702) 560-2853. Varied volunteer

opportunities. Pays standard mileage rate.

 

Foster Grandparent Program Catholic Charities

(702) 382-0721. Volunteers provide mentoring,
tutoring to children in day care centers,                              schools & protective services.

Helping Hands of Henderson

702-616-6554. Volunteers to help with

transportation for seniors to doctor

appointments, grocery shopping and errands

Helping Hands of Vegas Valley

2320 Paseo Del Prado Bldg. B #204

LV, NV 89102, (702) 633-7264, www.hhovv.org

Referral Service, Education, Respite Care,                          Volunteer Transportation, The Pantry,

Wheelchair van available

 

Infinity Hospice Care

6330 S. Jones Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89118

Contact Nikki Ellis 702-880-7002

Volunteer.lv@infinityhospicecare.com

 

Lend a Hand

(702) 294-2363

Opportunities available for Volunteers

 

Medicare S.H.I.P.

702-486-3478. Receive training in Medicare                          benefits & assist with questions and problems

 

Nevada SMP – SR Medicare Patrol

(702) 486-3403, 1-888-838-7305

Medicare Fraud and abuse prevention project

 

Safe House

(702) 451-4203. Volunteers to help with elder                    abuse & domestic violence

 

Senior Companion Program/Catholic

Charities of Southern Nevada

(702) 382-0721. Volunteers provide

companionship to homebound seniors

 

S. Nevada American Cancer Society

6165 S. Rainbow Blvd., LV, NV 89118

(702) 891-9009. Need drivers to take cancer                        patients to and from treatments. Also, other               opportunities available.

 

The Center

702-733-9800. Volunteers needed for the
information desk, event staffing,

administrative tasks and more.

 

Three Square Food

4190 N. Pecos Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89115

(702) 644-3663. Volunteers welcome

8am-5pm

Nevada-Senior-Guide Transportation Directory – Southern Nevada

American Cancer Society

6165 S. Rainbow Blvd., LV, NV

Provides free rides for cancer patients to and
from treatments. To schedule, call Road to
Recovery Program 1-866-949-1518.

For Emergency: 1-800-227-2345

 

CAT – Ride

600 S. Grand Central Pkwy., LV, NV 89101

Para-Transit (702) 228-4800 or Info (702) 228-7433

Discount Fares, must be 60 and older. 7am-6pm

 

Helping Hands of Henderson

102 E. Lake Mead Pkwy., Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 616-6554. Transportation, Community                          Research, Referrals, Senior Ride Program:                             60+, Henderson Resident

 

Helping Hands of N. Las Vegas

3640 N. 5th St., Ste., 130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 649-7853 – To schedule for doctor                               or misc. rides

 

Helping Hands of Vegas Valley

2320 Paseo Del Prado, Bldg. B #204, LV, NV                        89102, (702) 633-7264 x 28, www.hhovv.org

Volunteer Transportation

 

Martin Luther King Senior Center

2420 N. Martin Luther King Blvd., #B Bldg.

N. LV, NV 89032 (702) 636-0064 x 229

Call for details.

 

Senior Lifeline

2309 Renaissance Dr., #B, LV, NV 89119

Nevada-Senior-Guide Support Groups Directory – Southern Nevada

Adult Diabetes Education & Mgmnt.

West Charleston Library

6301 W. Charleston Blvd., LV, NV 89146

(702) 349-7370, www.diabetes-lasvegas.org

Support Group 2nd Tues. each month, 6-7:30pm

 

Alcoholics Anonymous

1431 E. Charleston Blvd., #15, LV, NV 89104-1734

702-598-1888, www.LVcentraloffice.org

Meeting Schedules, Telephone Reassurance,

12 Step-calls, literature

ALS of Nevada

4220 S. Maryland Pkwy., Bldg. B, Ste 404

Las Vegas, NV 89119

(702) 777-0500

Support Groups, ALS Clinic, Medical

Equipment to Lend (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)

 

Alzheimer’s Association S. Nevada Chapter

5190 S. Valley View Blvd.,#104, LV, NV 89118

(702) 248-2770, www.alzdsw.org

Referral Services, Resources, Support Groups,

24-hour Help Line 1-800-272-3900, respite
care, safe return program, education on
Dementia & Alzheimers

American Cancer Society

6165 S. Rainbow Blvd., Bldg. 12, LV, NV 89118

702-891-9009, www.cancer.org. Referral                             Service, call for appointment & event info.

American Diabetes Association

For diabeties info, call 702-369-9995 or

801-363-3024 x 7069, 888-342-2383

Resource/Referrals, Advocacy

American Lung Association

3552 W. Cheyenne Ave. #130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 431-6333, www.lungusa.org

Literature, Support Group, Better Breathers
Club, Freedom from smoking club

American Heart & Stroke Association

4445 S. Jones Blvd.,Ste. B1, LV, NV 89103

(702) 789-4370, www.strokeassociation.org

Resources to Physicians, hospitals, healthcare

professionals, and individuals, CPR classes

 

Arthritis Foundation Nevada

1368 Paseo Verde Pkwy, S-200B

Henderson, NV 89012. 702-367-1626

www.arthritis.org. Telephone Reassurance,                         Referral Service, Literature, Exercise Classes,         Aquatics, self-help programs

 

Cancer Connection

Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada

3730 S. Eastern Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89109

(702) 952-3400 Call for Info and Locations

 

Divorced & Widowed Adjustment, Inc.

P.O. Box 26504, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 735-5544, www.info4nv.org

Counseling Service

 

Epilepsy Support Group

Sunrise Hospital Auditorium

3186 S. Maryland Pkwy., LV, NV 89109

702-731-8115. 2nd Wed. of the month, 5:30pm.                     Meet other people with seizures

 

For the Cure, So. NV Affiliate

4850 W. Flamingo Rd., #25, LV, NV 89103

702-822-2324, www.komensouthernnevada.org

Education, Resources, Friendly Visitation,

Telephone Reassurance

Grief & Loss Support Groups

702-796-3157, www.NAH.org. Call for additional info

 

Hemophilia Foundation of Nevada

7473 W. Lake Mead Blvd., Ste 100, LV, NV 89128

(702) 564-4368, www.HFNV.org

Telephone Reassurance, Advocacy,

Education on bleeding disorders

Las Vegas Valley Lewy Body Dementia

Caregiver Support Group

Call (702) 789-8371 – Joan

Caregiver, Support group meets at Pacifica                          Green Valley: 2620 Robindale Rd., Henderson,                        last Monday of month – 2pm.

 

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

6280 S. Valley View Blvd.,#342, LV, NV 89118

(702) 436-4220, www.lls.org/snv

Information Resource Center, Education,                             Referral, Financial Aid, Support Groups

 

Muscular Dystrophy Assn.

6320 W. Cheyenne #150, Las Vegas, NV 89108

(702) 822-6920, www.mgausa.org

Counseling, Telephone Reassurance, Medical                      Care, Referral, Medical equipment available,                           must be registered with Muscular Dystrophy

 

National Kidney Foundation

15490 Ventura Blvd., Suite 210

Sherman Oaks, CA 91403, 1 (800) 747-5527

Patient Helpline 1-855-653-2273

www.kidney.org. Info, Referrals.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

2110 E. Flamingo, Ste., 203, LV, NV 89119

(702) 736-1478, www.nationalmssociety.org                         9am-5pm. Provide information, education,                   support services for families & persons with MS

Nevada Council on Problem Gambling

5552 S. Fort Apache Rd., Ste 100, LV, NV 89148

(702) 369-9740, www.nevadacouncil.org

Telephone Reassurance, Referral,

Problem Gambling Helpline:1-800-522-4700

 

Nevada Tobacco Users

Real help for smokers who want to stop.

Call 1-800-784-8669 (QUIT NOW)

 

No to Abuse – NV Outreach

621 S. Blagg Rd., Pahrump, NV 89048

Crisis line: 1-775-751-1118

Education, Food, Referral, 24/7 Crisis Line,                         Shelter, Counseling, Advocacy, Support                   Groups, intervention & prevention groups,                                parenting groups, shelter for domestic

violence, legal services

 

Ostomy Las Vegas – St. Rose Siena Hospital

Eastern and St. Rose Pkwy., Henderson, NV

Group meets from Sept. to June, 2nd Sat of                          Month, 2pm-4pm, 2nd Tues – Sept. – June, 7:30pm

www.ostomylasvegas.weebly.com

(702) 483-8116 for Info, snvostomy@gmail.com

 

Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Nevada

(702) 796-0430, www.ocan.org

Call for phone support from other women

 

Prostate Support Group, “Us Too”

702-917-7779, www.prostatetaskforce.nv.org

3rd Wed. of the month @7pm, St. Rose

Dominican Hospital, San Martin campus

8280 W. Warm Springs Rd. LV, NV

 

So. NV Association of Polio Survivors –

Las Vegas, Henderson, Pahrump & Boulder City

(702) 644-5091 – Diane. Call for locations.

Support Group for polio survivors , monthly

meetings every 3rd Saturday at 1pm, sharing

knowledge, information, social activities

Sunrise Hospital Breast Cancer Support

The Breast Cancer Center at Sunrise

3006 S. Maryland Pkwy., Ste. 250 LV, NV 89109

Oncology Nutrition Program: 6-7:30pm,

3rd Wed of the Month, need to RSVP

(702) 784-7870. Taichi: Thursdays

11am – 12pm, $5. Call for other programs.

 

Sunrise Hospital Stroke Support Group

Sunrise Hospital – Auditorium

3006 S. Maryland Pkwy., Las Vegas, NV 89109

Meet other people that have suffered a stroke.

3rd Wednesday of the month at 6pm. Free                              and open to the public. Registration not                    required. Learn valuable, educational info about                      strokes. This class is for adults only and you are
welcome to bring a friend or loved one.

Call 702-784-7983 for more info.

 

The Barbara Greenspun Women’s

Care Center of St. Rose

2651 Paseo Verde Pkwy, Ste. 180

Henderson, NV 89074, (702) 616-4902

Senior peer counseling for seniors 50+,
issues such as loss, bereavement, health                                problems, relationships and retirement

 

The Center – Wize Womyn

401 S. Maryland Pkwy. LV, NV 89101

702-733-9800, www.thecenterlv.org

Social and support group for LGBTQ Senior

drop ins. M-F 10:30am-2pm

 

The Center (Gay Men’s Forum)

401 S. Maryland Pkwy., LV, NV 89101

702-733-9800, www.thecenterlv.org

Social and support group for gay and bisexual                    men of all ages, each Wed. at 6pm.

 

Veterans National Caregivers Support Line

1-855-260-3274 VA Clinic Info 8am-8pm EST.

caregiver.va.gov

Nevada-Senior-Guide Resource Centers Directory – Southern Nevada

Cappalappa Family Resource Ctr..

189 N. Moapa Valley Blvd., Overton, NV 89040

1 (702) 397-6400,           8am-4pm. Advocacy,

Referral, Friendly Visitation,   Thrift Store

East Valley Family Services

1830 E. Sahara Ave., Ste 103, LV, NV 89104                           (702) 920-6581. Respite care by appointment,                support groups available. Call for hours.

H2U-Sunrise

3131 La Canada St., #107, LV, NV 89109

(702) 735-5510, www.h2u.com

Health & Wellness Education, Information,                          Seminars, Classes. Closed Fridays. Call for hours.

 

Las Vegas Resource Center

1050 E. Flamingo Rd. #W-156, LV, NV 89119

(702) 697-0841, www.dol.gov/esa

Claim Assistance for former Nevada Test Site

Workers and their families. Current and                               former employee’s.

 

Lion’s Health First Foundation

2770 S. Maryland Pkwy., Ste. 318, LV, NV 89109                 (702) 241-2400, Scheduling (702) 739-6393

www.lionshealthfirstfoundation.com

Ultrasound & screenings

L.V. Aviculture Society “The Bird Club“

Henderson Convention Center

200 S. Water St., Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 566-3688

All bird enthusiasts welcome. Special needs,

rehabilitation, rescue, Bird information, meets                   2nd Sunday of month, Volunteer’s Welcome

 

Pahrump Family Resource Ctr.

621 S. Blagg Rd., Pahrump, NV 89048

1 (775) 751-1118 Crisis Line

Referral Services, “No To Abuse”, Utility

assistance, Clothes, 8am-4pm, Daily.

Domestic violence, Title 4B Program

 

HopeLink Family Resource Center

1975 Arie Avenue, Laughlin, NV 89029

(702) 298-2592. Friendly Visitation, Telephone                    Reassurance, Referral. 10am-3pm, Tues – Fri

 

State of NV Aging & Disability Services Division

Community Home-Based Initiatives Program

1860 E. Sahara Avenue, LV, NV 89104

(702) 486-3545, www.nvaging.net

Case Management, Homemaker Program,

Advocacy, Community Ombudsman, Neglect                           Abuse, CHIP program

UMC Family Resource Center

901 Rancho Lane, Ste. 180, LV, NV 89106

(702) 383-2229, www.umcsn.com

Activities, Classes, Sr. Celebrations,

Call for additional info

 

United Way of Southern NV –     Volunteer Center

5830 W. Flamingo Rd., LV, NV 89103

702-892-2300 or 702-734-2273

http://volunteer.UWSN.org

Referrals, resources to groups, individuals                        needing volunteers to serve the community

 

Virgin Valley Family Services

312 W. Mesquite Blvd.. Door 103

Mesquite, NV 89027. 1 (702) 346-7277.

Referral Service, computer lab, Substance                         Abuse Program, Family advocacy, Welfare info

Nevada-Senior-Guide Referral Service Directory – Southern Nevada

Better Business Bureau

6040 S. Jones Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89118

(702) 320-4500, www.bbb.org

Referral Service, Complaint processing, 8-4pm

 

Friends of Parkinson’s Inc.

2400 N. Teneya Way, LV, NV 89128

702-381-4141, www.friendsofparkinsons.org

Email: info@ www.friendsofparkinsons.org

Mission to improve quality of life for those                          affected by parkinson’s through services,                     advocacy, and education

 

Nevada Disability Advocacy & Law Center

2820 W. Charleston Blvd., S-11, LV, NV 89102

702-257-8150

Call for information & assistance for
rehabilitation programs and employment,                              Major Complaints

 

Nevada SMP – SR Medicare Patrol

(SR Medical Patrol)

1820 E. Sahara Ave., Ste. 205, LV, NV 89104

702-486-3403 or 1-888-838-7305

http://ag.state.nv.us/senior/protection.htm

Medicare fraud and abuse prevention project

 

United States Senator-Dean Heller

8930 W. Sunset Rd. Ste. 230, LV, NV 89148                           (702) 388-6605, www.heller.senate.gov

 

United States Senator-Harry Reid

333 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #8016, LV, NV 89101

(702) 388-5020

Interpreter Service: Spanish, referral

 

United Way of So. Nevada

5830 W. Flamingo Rd, LV, NV 89103

(702) 734-2273, www.uwsn.org.

Fundraising needs. M-Th 8am-6pm, Closed Fri.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Multiple Services Directory – Southern Nevada

AARP – Nevada State Office / Contact Center

5820 S. Eastern Ave. #190, LV, NV 89119

Toll Free 1-866-389-5652

www.aarp.org/nv

Advocacy, Employment Assistance, Safe

Driving Instruction, Tax Services, Legal Services

Catholic Charities of So. Nevada

531 N. 30th St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 382-0721

Foster Grandparent Program, Senior                                     Companion Program, Retired Senior Volunteers.                    Mon-Fri 7:30am-4pm. Telephone reassurance,                     Legal services

City Mission of Las Vegas

2214 N. Pecos Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89115

(702) 384-1930. Referral Service, Counseling                     Services, Donations; Geriatric, Friendly
Visitation, Food Boxes, clothing, Breakfast
8:30-9:30, Need application on file.

 

Clark County – Public Guardian

515 Shadow Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 455-4332, www.accessclarkcounty.com

Guardianship, Provide financial management

Clark County Social Services

1600 Pinto Lane, LV, NV 89106

(702) 455-7051, www.clarkcounty.com

Referral Service, Alternative Healthcare,

Long-Term Care, Homemaker Program,                   Financial Help, U.S. Citizens and Legal

Residents, Short Term Info, 7am-4:30pm

 

Friends in the Desert, Inc.

43 West Pacific Avenue, Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 565-8742

Meals served 6 days a week, Call for times,                          Clothing needed, Legal Assistance

 

Grace Care Center

2020 W. Bonanza Rd., LV, NV 89106

702-749-6332

Wellness, Mentoring Center, Basic Skills,                           Psycho-Social Rehab. Call for additional info

 

Hope Link of Southern Nevada

178 Westminster Way, Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 566-0576. Rental/Utilities assistance,                         Food Pantry, Henderson Residents, Mon –                  Thur, 8am – 6pm, Closed 12pm – 1pm for                             Lunch, closed Friday. Need proof of income                              and residency, NV ID, SS Card

 

Help of Southern Nevada

1640 E. Flamingo Rd., LV, NV 89119

(702) 369-4357, www.helpsonv.org

Travelers Assistance, Home Repairs, Shelter,

Food, Clothing, Family Resources, Lifeline,

Respite Services, Bus tokens, weatherization.

Renters utility services, HOPWA Program,

7am-5pm, Work Center, Homeless Services.                           Closed Fri.

Helping Hands of Henderson

102 E. Lake Mead Pkwy., Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 616-6554

Community Research, Referrals, Transportation,

60+ Older Henderson Residents, 8am-4:30pm

Helping Hands of NLV

3640 North 5th St., Suite 130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 649-7853. Referral, Paper Goods/Pantry
Distribution, Transportation to Doctor, Repair
– small jobs – inside only & miscellaneous.

Helping Hands of Vegas Valley

2320 Paseo Del Prado Bldg. B #204, LV, NV 89102

(702) 633-7264, www.hhovv.org

Referral Service, Respite Care, Volunteer

Transportation, The Pantry, Wheelchair van                        available. 60+ Over

Jewish Family Service Agency

4794 S. Eastern Ave., Ste. C, LV, NV 89119

(702) 732-0304, www.jfsalv.org. Call for hours.

Counseling, Holocaust Survivor Assistance,                       Adoption, Career Development, Pantry.

Las Vegas Rescue Mission

480 West Bonanza Road, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 382-1766, www.vegasrescue.org

8am-6:30pm, Phone assistance for info

Shelter, Referral, Counseling, Nutrition, Eye                    Glasses, Thrift Store

 

Las Vegas Senior Citizens Ctr.

451 East Bonanza Road, Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 229-6454. Tripsters, Socialization,
monthly luncheons,  arts & crafts, exercise,
computers, music,  singing, billiards.

 

Lend A Hand, Inc.

400 Utah St., Boulder City, NV 89005

(702) 294-2363. Transportation, Referral,                           Friendly Visitation, Respite Care (3 hrs), Health         equipment M – F 9:00am – 2:00pm, In-Home                                Services, Lend a Hand Program

 

Lutheran Social Services of NV

73 Spectrum Blvd., LV, NV 89101

(702) 639-1730, www.lssnv.org

Food Pantry (over 62), Housing/Rental

Assistance, Utility assistance, Help getting                          State ID & Birth Certificates, Call for Info.                7:30am-4pm. Special programs.

Nevada Senior Services

901 N. Jones Blvd., LV, NV 89108, 702-648-3425

Creative aging, caregiver support groups,                             outreach programs, home modification. Call                             for additional assistance. Senior Assessment

 

Nevada SMP Senior Medicare Patrol

1860 E. Sahara Ave., LV, NV 89104

702-486-3403 or 1-888-838-7305

Prevention of fraud & medicare abuse, File claims

 

Nevada State Contractors Board

2310 Corporate Cir., Ste 200

Henderson, NV 89074

(702) 486-1100, www.nscb.nv.gov

Regulatory agency promoting quality

construction by Nevada licensed contractors.                   Provides contractor license verifications,

assistance with contractor workmanship

issues and homeowner education

regarding unlicensed contractors.

 

Nevada Talking Book Services (Library)

100 N. Stewart St., Carson City, NV 89701

1-800-922-9334, www.nevadaculture.org

Provide books, magazines, auto books

for blind and physically handicapped

Nevada Talking Book Services

6655 W. Sahara Ave., Ste B200, LV, NV 89146

(702) 486-3737, www.nevadaculture.org

Outreach and public awareness

 

RAGE Program – Aging & Disability

Resource Center           (702) 333-1038

2901 El Camino Ave., S-102, LV, NV 89102

Referral Service, Home Modification:

Minor, Build Handicap Ramps, Durable

Medical, Home & Vehicle Modification,                   Prescription Assistance

 

 

Senior Life Line/Goldberg Senior Center

2309 Renaissance Dr. #B, LV, NV 89119

(702) 933-1191. Transportation for Groceries
+ DRs, Homemaker Service, Nutritional
Program, Kosher Meals On Wheels, Home                             Safety Program, Limited Space, Henderson                    Transportation, Lunch on Fridays, Taxi
Vouchers

So. NV Center for Independent Living

4100 N. Martin Luther King, Ste. E100,

N. Las Vegas, NV 89030. www.sncil.org

(702) 649-3822, (800) 398-0760 toll free

People with disabilities, Counseling, Housing

Assistance, Advocacy, Technical Assistance,                        Public Awareness, Education, Referral info for                     food and transportation

 

State of NV Aging & Disability Services Division

Community Home-Based Initiatives Programs

1860 E. Sahara Ave., LV, NV 89104, 702-486-3545

Referral Service, Homemaker Program, Meal                      Delivery, Advocacy, Community Ombudsman,
Medicare counseling, taxi coupons, RX
Assistance, Elder Abuse and Neglect, Grant                        Programs, CHIP, Complaints.

 

Sun City Summerlin Charities, Inc.

10362 Sun City Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89134

(702) 254-5831. Hours: 8:30am-11am

Residents Only. Transportation, Small

handyman jobs

 

The Salvation Army-Family Services

1581 N. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 649-8240. Food Assistance, Case
Management, Referral,  gas & electric out
reach program, Age 62 (need to call for
qualification)

 

The Salvation Army

2900 Palomino Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89107

(702) 870-4430. Administrative Offices, Church

Donations welcome.

Veterans So. NV, Health Care System

N. Las Vegas, NV 89036

(702) 791-9000 for clinic connections

1-800-273-8255 Suicide, Opt 1 Lifeline

Pharmaceutical & Medical Assistance,

Psychiatric, Counseling, Support Groups,                            Respite Care, Assisted Care, Transportation                            to and from various clinics, VA benefits and                          services, Flu shots, Care Giver Program

Women’s Dev. Ctr. for Independent Living

4020 Pecos-McLeod, Las Vegas, NV 89104

(702) 796-7770. Affordable Rental Program,                      Clothing donations welcome. Call for Food                             Bank Info

Nevada-Senior-Guide Medical Assistance Directory – Southern Nevada

Access to Healthcare Networks

Main office located in Reno

702-489-3400 OR 1-877-385-2345

Discounted Dental & Vision Program.

 

AMR Transport

7201 W. Post Rd., LV, NV 89113

(702) 384-3400

Medical Assistance, Ambulance Company,

Wheel Chair Assistance

 

Clark County Social Services

1600 Pinto Lane, LV, NV 89106

(702) 455-4270 x 3 for Senior Help

Medical Assistance, Case Management,                   Referral, Transportation, Rent Assistance,                             8am-5pm. Call for Locations. Home Maker                             Program, Main office

 

Nevada Health Centers

1799 Mount Maria Dr., LV, NV 89106

www.NVRHC.org

(702) 307-5414 Call for multiple locations                         Medical Care: Healthcare, Lab work, Screenings,

Prescriptions, Dental, Help Homeless, OB/GYN                  clinic, Family Practices, Foot care clinic, Wick           Program, sliding fee scale. 8am – 5pm, M – F,                          Mamo van info

 

NV Community Enrichment Program

6375 W. Charleston Blvd.

Las Vegas, NV 89146

(702) 259-1903, www.accessible.org

Comprehensive day treatment & rehabilitation                    for traumatic brain injury. 8am-4:30pm

 

NV State Health Division

Community Health Nursing

1981 E. Calvada Blvd. North, #100

Pahrump, NV 89060

(775) 751-7070 Give flu shots, blood pressure                    checks – Please Call First. WICK services

 

Sanford Center For Aging at UNR

Sanford Center for Aging 146, MS146

Reno, NV 89557-0133

1 (775) 784-4774, www.unr.edu/sanford

Elders Count, Referral Service, medication

management, Volunteer Program, Education                        Info, Caregiver Support

 

Rawson Neal Psychiatric Hospital

1650 Community College Dr., LV, NV 89146

702-486-4400. Inpatient services

 

S. Nevada Adult Mental Health Clinic

6161 W. Charleston, LV, NV 89146, 702-486-6045

Outpatient services, Pharmacy, Medication                           counselling, Medical records and benefits.                              Call for other locations.

 

S. NV Cancer Research Foundation

601 S. Rancho Dr., #C-26, LV, NV 89106

(702) 384-0013, www.sncrf.org

Clinical trials

 

University Medical Center Hospital

1800 West Charleston Blvd., LV, NV 89102

(702) 383-2000, www.umcsn.com

Medical Care, Rehabilitation, Education,

Interpreter Service: Spanish

Nevada-Senior-Guide Financial Assistance Directory – Southern Nevada

Auto Insurance Discounts

AARP Driver Safety Class

Qualify for 3 yrs. Auto insurance discounts per NV Law

AARP Members $15; non-members $20

1-877-846-3299

www.aarp.org/drive

 

American Red Cross

1771 E. Flamingo Rd. #206B, LV, NV 89119

(702) 791-3311, www.redcrosslasvegas.org

Financial, Assistance to victims of disaster,

Military Services, Retired Military, CPR & First Aid                         classes, Donations and Volunteers welcome.

 

Clark County Advocate Program

1600 Pinto Lane, LV, NV 89106, (702) 455-7051

Limited financial assistance. Call for info.

 

Clark County Assessor

Main Office: 500 S. Grand Central Parkway

Las Vegas, NV 89106, Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm

3211 N. Tenaya Way #118

Las Vegas, NV 89129 (closed Fridays)

(702) 455-3891 Main Number

(702) 455-3882 Customer Service

www.accessclarkcounty.com/assessor

Qualified exemptions, walk-in customers

only-payments, information

Century Link

Call for various locations. (702) 244-7400

No Federal Line Charge, Lifeline Services

 

Comfort Savings Program – NV Energy

(702) 402-5555 Customer Service

www.nvenergy.com. Free home energy
efficiency audits & upgrades for income
qualified customers. Empower Program.

Cool SHARE & SXACT Comfort Programs.

Emergency Aid For Boulder City

600 Nevada Way, Boulder City, NV 89005

(702) 293-0332. Financial, Food Pantry &                              Housing Assistance Mon-Fri. 9am-noon.                       Boudler city residents.

 

Financial Guidance Center

2650 S. Jones Blvd., LV, NV 89146

702-364-0344

Utility Assistance, 1st time home buyers,                               credit counseling.

 

Henderson-NV State Welfare

520 South Boulder Hwy., Henderson, NV 89015

1-800-992-0900 or 702-486-1001

1-775-684-0350 N. Nevada – Unemployment

1-888-890-8211 Other Locations

Food Stamps, Medicaid, Seniors Over 65,

Emergency Assistance, State Operators

Nevada State Welfare & Supportive Services

3330 E. Flamingo Rd., Ste. 55. LV, NV 89121

(702) 486-9400 OR 1-800-992-0900

Food Stamps, Medicaid, Seniors over 65,

Domestic Violence, Rehab.

(702) 836-3175, SNAP Program,

ENERGY Assistance

 

Social Security Administration

4340 Simmons St., N. LV, NV 89032

1-800-772-1213 or 1-866-614-9667 Local

www.ssa.gov, www.socialsecurity.gov

Financial Assistance, Interpreter Service:                            Spanish, Call for Benefits and Hours

www.healthreform.gov

 

Social Security Administration

10416 S. Eastern Ave., Henderson, NV 89052

1-800-772-1213 or 1-855-207-7084 Local

www.socialsecurity.gov. Call for benefits & hours

 

Social Security Administration – Card Center

1250 S. Buffalo Drive, S-150, LV, NV 89117

1-800-772-1213, 1-866-704-4859 Local

www.socialsecurity.gov

Call for Benefits and Hours

Southern NV Ctr. for Independent Living

2950 S. Rainbow, #220, LV, NV 89146

(702) 889-4216, www.sncil.org

4100 N. Martin Luther King, Ste. E100

N. LV, NV 89032, 702-649-3822

Benefits Counseling, Housing Referral,

Transportation for disabled

State of Nevada Welfare Division

702-486-5000

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Pgm.

Energy Assistance Program,

Fixed & Low Income, Medicade

Nevada-Senior-Guide Employment Assistance Directory – Southern Nevada

Employment Assistance, Community Service

Employment Program, Senior Work Search Program

Catholic Charities of So. Nevada

1501 N. Las Vegas Blvd.

Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 215-4703, www.catholiccharities.com

Senior Employment – 8:00am to 3:00pm

Catholic Charities of So. Nevada

2065 E. Sahara Ave., S-C

Las Vegas, NV 89104

(702) 382-0721

Hours: Mon – Fri. 7:00am to 3:30pm

Foster Grandparent Program, Volunteer Program,

Respite, SR Companion

CHR, Inc.

2980 S. Jones Blvd., Suite H

Las Vegas, NV 89146

(702) 889-4466

Employment Skills, Resume writing, Interview

techniques, Occupational job training, Gateway

to employment training for seniors.

Foundation for an Independent Tomorrow (FIT)

1931 Stella Lake Dr., Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 367-4348

www.lasvegasfit.org

Employment Services – Teaching job skills, resume

updates, vocational training funding, on-site computer

classes, and workplace readiness assistance

Goodwill of So. NV Vocational Services

1280 W. Cheyenne Avenue

N. Las Vegas, NV 89030

(702) 597-1107, www.sngoodwill.org

Mon-Thurs 9am-4pm, Fri 9am-Noon

Employment Training, Job Placement, Job Opportunities

Donations Welcome

Nevada Job Connect

3405 S. Maryland Pkwy.

Las Vegas, NV 89169

(702) 486-0100, Hotline: (702) 486-0173

8am-5pm daily, Mon – Fri

Employment Assistance, Training Opportunities

N. Las Vegas (702) 486-0200

Henderson (702) 486-0300

Southern Nevada

Sponsored by Nevada Senior Guide 55

Opportunity Village-ARC

6300 West Oakey Blvd.

Las Vegas, NV 89146

(702) 259-3700, www.opportunityvillage.org

Rehabilitation, Employment, Mentally Challenged,

Work Training Center

SCORE So. NV

400 S. 4th Street, #250-A, Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 388-6104, www.scorelv.org

Business Consultants for new small businesses

Monthly Seminars, Volunteer Programs

State of Nevada Casual Labor Office

1001 North A Street

Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 486-3441, 6am – 3pm

Short-term employment, Day Labor (cleaning,

heavy moving labor), construction, Landscape

Nevada-Senior-Guide KNPR 88-9 Radio – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Leisure 

http://www.knpr.org/

NSG_FebMarApr_2014_Web16

Nevada Public Radio KNPR

Radio Reading Service
Nevada Public Radio
 Do you know someone who has a problem reading?Let Nevada Public Radio Help.The Radio Reading Service offers free reading broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week for people who are visually and print impaired.Statewide newspapers including the Review-Journal, Las Vegas Sun and Reno Gazette-Journal
National publications including Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal
Best-selling and critically-acclaimed booksSpecial radio receivers are provided free of charge for the broadcasts.

For an application, call Jay Bartos at
702-258-9895

KNEWS 970am

970 AMKNUU Las Vegas

Business & Financial Talk

Your money

Your life

Your radio station

News, Traffic & Weather throughout the day

Community shows on finance and lifestyle

Plus Paul Harvey, Ray Lucia

Bruce Williams, Lou Dobbs,

Wall Street Journal Reports

Donald Trump & Andy Vierra

Streaming on the web 24/7

970KNUU.com

Frequently Asked Questions About Nevada Public Radio
  • Privacy Policy
  • Mailing List Policy
  • Membership Information
  • Prize Giveaway Guidelines
  • Annual Report
  • Contact
  • Programs
  • Features
  • Radio Reading Service
  • Sponsors
  • Transmitters
  • Jobs
  • Auto Donation
  • E News
  • HD Radio
“Nevada Public Radio will be recognized as the leading independent source of information and cultural expression, and a catalyst for civic engagement.”

Our history…

Nurtured in its formative years by the Clark County Library District, Nevada Public Radio was incorporated in December, 1975 as an independent, Nevada non-profit corporation. Its flagship station, KNPR signed on the air March 24, 1980 as Nevada’s first National Public Radio (NPR) affiliated station.

Nevada Public Radio operates a non-commercial, radio broadcast network comprised of seven stations, KNPR Las Vegas (88.9), KCNV Las Vegas (89.7), KTPH Tonopah (91.7), KLNR Panaca (91.7), KWPR Lund/Ely (88.7), KSGU St. George (90.3), KLKR Elko (89.3), plus five rural translators. It is overseen by a volunteer Board of Directors including founder and Director Emeritus, Lamar Marchese.

The staff includes full-time staff of 30, plus part time and contract employees, and dozens of administrative and fundraising volunteers. More than 9,000 members and 50 corporations and foundations support the stations.

KNPR broadcasts with 100,000 watts (ERP), at 88.9 FM. It programs a 24 hour service of National Public Radio (NPR) news and information, with specialty shows like A Prairie Home Companion and Car Talk. (See our program schedule.)

Nevada Public Radio produces 10 hours a week of original content. KNPR’s State of Nevada is a national award-winning public affairs program supported by a dynamic web site.  Launched with a $500,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, KNPR’s SoN has been honored locally and nationally for program excellence including the ACE Award from the Public Radio Program Directors Association.

Independent research shows the combined Nevada Public Radio weekly audience is more than 200,000 listeners, our website attracts approximately 240,000 visitor sessions each month and more than 200,000 audio downloads of original content.

To serve residents of Nevada and adjacent states, Nevada Public Radio operates a series of transmitters extending service to more than 150,000 residents within its 49,000 square miles coverage area, including Tonopah, Panaca, Ely, Mesquite, Laughlin and Scotty’s Junction, NV, plus Death Valley and Ridgecrest, CA, Lake Havasu City, AZ and St. George, UT.

In 1993, responding to another unmet need, Nevada Public Radio established the state’s first and only Radio Reading Service. This closed-circuit, 24 hour reading service delivers timely, original information totally free of charge to blind and visually-impaired listeners throughout the coverage area. With the cooperation of KUNR-Reno and KNCC-Elko, the service is available to 98% of the Nevada population.  It is also available online.

After many years of effort in 2003, Nevada Public Radio signed on a new full-service station in Las Vegas, Classical 89.7, which provides 24-hours a day classical music.

Our newest, full-service station is in Elko, NV – News 89.3 KLKR, which provides 24-hours a day news and information.

Nevada Public Radio operates on an annual budget of $4.7-million. See our latest Annual Audited Financial Statement  and our latest Form 990.

This on-line Annual Report informs members, underwriters, grantors and other community shareholders about the financial health of Nevada Public Radio, including investments, station goals and objectives.  The member recognition includes profiles of some the supporters of Nevada Public Radio.

In 1996, Nevada Public Radio was one of seven applicants, out of 1,300 candidates, to receive a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. NVPR received $4.5 million dollars to construct and equip a new permanent home for KNPR.

Endowment

In accepting the Reynolds award, the Board of Directors committed itself to raising a minimum of $1.5 million in endowment funding. That commitment has increased to $2.2 million. The endowment campaign received a lead gift from the L. J. Castle family, along with early contributions from the Boyd Foundation, the Nevada Arts Council, the Lincy Foundation, Frances Saxton, Jim Rogers, J. A. Tiberti, John Klai, the Laub family (Bill Sr., Mary and Bill Jr.), Louis Castle and Westwood Studios, The National Endowment for the Humanities, the Union Pacific Foundation, as well as individual contributions from the listeners, staff and Board of Directors of Nevada Public Radio.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

http://www.nvaging.net/

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) in the State of Nevada, Department of Health and Human Services, represents Nevadans aged 60 years and older and those with disabilities.

Mission Statement The Aging and Disability Services Division provides leadership and advocacy in the planning, development and delivery of a high quality, comprehensive support service system across the lifespan. This allows all of Nevada’s elders, adults and children with disabilities or special health care needs to live independent, meaningful, and dignified lives in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs. Developmental Services

State of Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD)

Programs/Services

 

Advocate for Elders

Advocacy, assistance, information and referral to frail seniors, who are 60 years of age or older, primarily homebound and living in the community, and their caregivers.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)

Provides citizen-centered “one-stop” entry points into the long-term support system. Serves individuals in need of long-term support, caregivers, and those planning for future long-term support needs.

Assisted Living (AL) Waiver

Assisted living supportive services to eligible individuals in a residential facility as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Community Options Program for the Elderly (COPE)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement. Similar to the HCBW Program.

 

Disability Rx (External link) Assistance with the cost of prescription medicines to qualified individuals with disabilities.

 

Disability Services (External link)The Office of Disability Services provides resources at the community level which promote equal opportunity and life choices for people with disabilities through which they may positively contribute to Nevada.

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

For persons 60 years old and older who may experience abuse, neglect, exploitation, or isolation.

 

Grants

Information for current and/or prospective grantees.

 

Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW formerly CHIP)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Homemaker Program

General housekeeping, limited meal preparation, shopping, laundering, errands, standby assistance with bathing, and home management services.

 

IDEA Part C Office

Provides oversight of Part C (early intervention services) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Addresses issues and problems faced by residents in long term care facilities, which includes residential facilities for groups.

 

Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

The goal of the SMP program is to empower seniors to prevent Medicare/health care fraud through outreach and education.

 

Senior Rx

Nevada’s plan to provide Nevada seniors relief from the high cost of prescription medicine.

 

Senior Tax Assistance/Rent Rebate Program

This program is no longer available.

 

State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP)

Medicare Counseling Information

Counseling and assistance to Medicare Beneficiaries in Nevada, utilizing a statewide network of volunteers.

 

Taxi Assistance Program (TAP)

Discounted taxicab fares to seniors and persons with disabilities in Clark County. (Washoe County also has a program of this type.

 

 

Waiver for the Elderly in Adult Residential Care (WEARC)

Non-medical services in a group care setting to offer individuals a less expensive alternative of supervised care in a residential setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Helping Hands of Vegas Valley – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.hhovv.org

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SERVING SENIORS in SOUTHERN NEVADA

No Cost Services Assist Seniors to Remain Independent

  Established in 2000, Helping Hands of Vegas Valley is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with the mission to provide free, assistive services to senior citizens in Southern Nevada, allowing them to maintain their dignity and independence while improving health and daily living.

Our services include:

  • Transportation
  • Food Pantry
  • Respite Care Vouchers

Volunteer at your convenience!

SERVICES

We are a community agency providing the following free services to seniors 60 and over in the Las Vegas Valley.

Transportation

Transportation

HHOVV has two Para transit buses that can accommodate wheelchair clients. Rides are provided for medical appointments, grocery store shopping and other errands.

HHOVV volunteer drivers provide transportation to and from medical appointments, shopping trips and errands. All volunteers receive orientation training and a background check.

New clients meet with HHOVV’s intake coordinator for an assessment and must be 60 years of age or older, show proof of Nevada residency and display a need for assistance. Individuals needing services are typically alone and frail, chronically ill, homebound, and/or dependent on a primary caregiver. Reassessments are completed on an annual basis. HHOVV does not charge for these services. Volunteers and staff do not accept tips, gifts, fees, loans or anything of value from clients.

To be added to the waiting list for transportation services please contact Myrna or Nichole at 702-633-7264 x29.

Respite Care Vouchers

Respite Care Vouchers

The HHOVV respite voucher program is funded by the state Aging and Disabled Services Division and provides temporary relief for caregivers. Individuals who do not take time off while caring for a loved one may compromise their physical and mental well-being. Utilizing respite services is one way to reduce stress, allowing individuals to be more effective caregivers. Also, using respite services may delay early institutionalization

Food Pantry

Food Pantry

HHOVV also keeps a food pantry stocked with non-perishable items and delivers a free bag once a month to clients who meet eligibility requirements. Clients must be 60 years of age or older, show proof of Nevada residency and proof that their annual income is at or below 150% of current poverty guidelines. To become a pantry recipient a senior may call 702-633-7264 x22 and leave their name and phone number.

The organization accepts donations of non-perishable food items at a warehouse office in North Las Vegas. Donations are always appreciated!

If you are interested in holding a food drive for HHOVV please contact Lorri Highet at 702-633-7264 x30.

An organization serving the Seniors of Las Vegas.

2320 Paseo Del Prado #B112

Las Vegas, NV 89102

702-633-7264

E-mail: hhofvv@aol.com

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!