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volunteers | Nevada Senior Guide

Volunteers: A Key To Curing Alzheimer’s Disease

October 19, 2017 by · Comments Off on Volunteers: A Key To Curing Alzheimer’s Disease
Filed under: Articles 

(NAPS)—Although more than 5 million people age 65 and older in the U.S. are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and while that number is expected to jump to 13.5 million by 2050, there is reason to hope. That’s good news for the almost 15 million more Americans—family members, friends, neighbors and volunteers—currently caring for their loved ones with AD without any real options to help them get better.

Alzheimer’s is the only disease in the top 10 causes of death without a way to prevent, cure or even slow the progression of the disease. In fact, between 2000 and 2008, deaths from AD in­creased by 66 percent, while deaths from HIV, stroke, heart disease and prostate cancer all declined significantly.

Scientists have learned a great deal about potential underlying causes of AD, and advancements in treatments have been accomplished in recent years. To spur more breakthroughs and speed discoveries, scientists are focusing on early detection through neuroimaging of the brain.

“We have to understand Alz­heimer’s from its earliest signs in order to treat it effectively,” said Michael Weiner, M.D., principal investigator of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). “If we can get a fuller picture of the brain and identify signs of the disease before someone gets ill, we can develop better treatment options, which could slow the progression and one day even prevent or cure Alzheimer’s.”

ADNI, the largest Alzheimer’s study of its kind, is now in its second phase (ADNI 2). Scientists are looking for volunteers ages 55–90 to participate in the study to allow them to continue their research at the pace needed to be successful against the disease. They are seeking healthy individuals, those with some memory concerns and people with diagnosed AD.

Participants will not only be contributing to the search for treatments and a cure for AD, they will also have the benefit of access to leading medical experts in the field. In many communities, it is difficult to find someone who knows specifically about Alz­heimer’s disease, so clinical trials can be a great way to work with specialists.

“We cannot cure what we do not understand,” said Dr. Weiner. “But with the help of volunteers across the nation, we’re on the right path and making great strides to end the Alzheimer’s epidemic.”

To volunteer or learn more about the study, contact the National Institute on Aging’s Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center at (800) 438-4380 or visit www.adni-info.org.

Changing the face of AD is possible, but we can’t find the answers we need without volunteers. Consider being part of the historic ADNI study.

The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

April 18, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Development of Old Age and Related Issues
Filed under: General 

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

  1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.
  2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.
  3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.
  4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.
  5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.
  6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.
  7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.
  8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male, (Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

  1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change in attitude to work.
  2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.
  3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage to self concept, depression.
  4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

  1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.
  2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”
  3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”
  4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.
  5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

[http://www.psychologynatural.com/DepressionBroch.html]

Dr. Victor Barnes is an Adelaide psychologist and hypnotherapist. He has also had three decades of experience in adult education including serving as Dean of a Sri Lankan college (ICBT) teaching several Australian degrees. His overseas experience includes studies and consulting experience in USA, PNG, Poland and Sri Lanka.

Red Cross Blood Products Prolong Life of Two-Year-Old Las Vegan

December 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Two-year-old Sawyer Balonek of Las Vegas has been diagnosed with Bruton Agammaglobulinemia, an inherited immunodeficiency disease.  He has to have an infusion of immunoglobulin every four weeks from plasma extracted from blood given by volunteer donors.

 

The blood products needed by Sawyer are provided by the American Red Cross.  The Red Cross is the predominant blood supplier in Las Vegas and has held several blood drives in Sawyer’s honor to help make sure he gets the blood products he needs.  Sawyer’s parents agree that Sawyer is alive today because of the excellent medical care he has received and the blood products provided by the Red Cross.

 

In 2010 a group of local hospitals invited the Red Cross to bid for the contract to supply blood in southern Nevada.  The Red Cross won the contract, supplanting United Blood Services (UBS) as the provider of blood products for nine of the 14 hospitals in Las Vegas.  In order to meet the demand, the Red Cross strives to collect almost 900 units per week.

 

According to Julia Wulf, chief executive  officer of the American Red Cross Blood Service Region, “It is very challenging for us to collect enough blood in Las Vegas to meet the needs of the southern Nevada hospitals we serve.  We need more donors and we need businesses, churches and other organizations to sponsor blood drives here.”

 

To make an appointment to donate blood, call 1-800-RED CROSS or visit redcrossblood.org.

 

For more information about scheduling a blood drive call (702) 522-3998.

 

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About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Deserving Senior Caregivers to be Rewarded through “Caring for the Caregiver” Program Sponsored by Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving

Caregiver nominations taken online at www.twilightwish.org until October 15

The national nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation and Parentgiving are pleased to announce the “Caring for the Caregiver” award. According to a recently released Bureau of Labor Statistics survey, over 39 million Americans provide hours of unpaid care to someone over the age of 65. Caregivers often struggle with their own physical, financial and mental needs. This program was created to recognize and reward these deserving senior caregivers who often put their own needs last by providing a respite from caregiving duties.

“Often, caregivers are seen as hidden patients themselves,” said Cass Forkin, founder of Twilight Wish. “Although caregiving is a labor of love to many, the stress and strain of providing around-the- clock care often takes a toll on the caregivers, both mentally and physically.”

According to David Spain, CEO of Parentgiving, many caregivers are often not able to get the break from their responsibilities that they need. “This program offers caregivers the chance to relax and rejuvenate, away from their daily duties,” said Spain. “We want them to know that their selfless contributions and dedication are appreciated.”

Twilight Wish and Parentgiving chose August 21 to launch “Caring for the Caregiver” because it’s National Senior Citizens Day, first proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan in 1988. “Older citizens are reinforcing their historical roles as leaders and as links with our patrimony and sense of purpose as individuals and as a Nation,” said the late president.

Anyone can nominate a deserving caregiver by filling out an application at www.twilightwish.org.  Caregivers can nominate themselves. Entries will be accepted through October 15, 2013. The winner will be notified in early November 2013. The “Caring for the Caregiver” award may be a two-night hotel stay, restaurant meal(s), spa treatment(s), or tickets to an event or any combination of these as chosen by the award winner. The winner will also receive free in-home caregiving services from a local senior homecare organization, ensuring a worry-free getaway.

Twilight Wish Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization whose mission is to honor and enrich the lives of deserving seniors through wish granting celebrations that connect generations. Since its founding in 2003, Twilight Wish has granted over 1,931 individual wishes to deserving, low-income seniors, thanks to volunteers, corporate and community involvement, and donations. Recent wishes granted include a visit from a string band for a nursing home resident’s 89th birthday, transporting a nursing home resident to Christmas Eve dinner with family, and hearing aids for an Army veteran who wished to be able to hear his grandchildren’s voices. For more, visit www.twilightwish.org.

Parentgiving.com is a leading online destination for seniors and their caregivers, offering a wealth of information on eldercare, news, Q&As with experts, and healthy aging resources as well as a store with thousands of homecare products and medical supplies, delivered right to the home. Bestsellers include walkers, bed rails, bath safety bars, incontinence supplies, and daily living aids. For more, visit www.Parentgiving.com. For more about Parentgiving’s mission, contact Julie Davis at 203-984-4424.

For more about the “Caring for the Caregiver Award,” contact Mary Farrell, Twilight Wish Director of Community Relations, 215-230-8777 ext. 103

Read more news from Parentgiving

Circle of Life Community Hospice – Reno Nevada

August 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Reno 

www.colhospice.com

COL-Logo-New_CS6-2

Circle of Life Hospice helps people in the advanced stages of a chronic or terminal illness who have made the decision to live their remaining days with dignity and surrounded by compassionate caregivers. Our hospice team consists of nurses, aides, social workers, spiritual care advisers, physicians, volunteers, dietitians, therapists and bereavement counsel with that will facilitate helping you “live with” versus “dying from” an illness.

If we can help you see death through new eyes , it will help you to transform your grieving process and change how you view your world, forever.

We have learned from our patients that the Art of Living at the end of life is a time of life that can involve tremendous personal and spiritual growth.

Circle of Life Hospice

1575 Delucchi Lane,

Suite 214

Reno, NV 89502

775-827-2298

TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

 

Terry Murphy, a longtime local businesswoman and community leader who is president of Strategic Solutions and serves as president of Downtown Las Vegas Alliance, is the SHARE Humanitarian for the month of May for her volunteering efforts with Veterans Village, The Rape Crisis Center and the Variety Early Leaning Center Lorenzi Campus.TERRY MURPHY RECOGNIZED AS SHARE HUMANITARIAN OF THE MONTH

Murphy also serves as Honorary Consul for the Republic of Ireland and as a board member of The Smith Center for the Performing Arts.

 

Each month, SHARE honors those in the community who give without hesitation to help others in need. Murphy was selected for this honor from the more than 1,500 SHARE volunteers in Southern Nevada.

SHARE is involved with raising funds for various social causes including housing assistance and neighborhood support service programs.

 

About SHARE:

SHARE is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1994 by business executives dedicated to providing affordable housing for individuals in need. During its nearly 20 year history, the organization has served hundreds of families, seniors, veterans and those with physical challenges or terminal illnesses. sharelasvegas.org

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About The Rape Crisis Center:

The Rape Crisis Center (RCC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1974 by Florence McClure and Sandra Petta as the Community Action Against Rape (CAAR) with the goal of helping those in Clark County heal from the trauma of sexual violence. Today, The Rape Crisis Center operates a 24/7 crisis hot line for sexual assault victims and provides counseling, advocacy and support to help victims begin the healing process and navigate the legal system. The RCC is also committed to the prevention of sexual assault through educational programs and community outreach. To assist victims to become survivors, the organization depends on a core base of dedicated volunteers and staff. These individuals are empathetic and enthusiastic people who give their time, energy, and personal sacrifice to continue to serve Clark County’s victims of sexual violence. This service is provided through face-to-face and over-the- phone intervention with newly victimized individuals.The Rape Crisis Center hotline number is 888-366-1640.  For more information, visit www.therapecrisiscenter.org.

 

Mobile Carwash; Senior Citizens and Mobile Homes by Lance Winslow

May 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Senior citizens are generally not a large marketing segment for mobile  detailers or car washers, however, they should not be ignored.  You will find in  a near by area a seniors-only mobile home park.  You will also find square dance  clubs and senior centers.  All of these places can be extremely good places to  look for new business.  If you want to accelerate word of mouth advertising, you  should meet with people in these groups.  Wash cars at senior centers while they  play cards.  Hand out flyers, etc.

In mobile home parks you should hand out flyers and put flyers on bulletin  boards in the recreation rooms.  If you wash one mobile home in a mobile home  park, the word of mouth will spread the news of your service like wildfire.   Next thing you know, you’ll be washing every mobile home in the place.   Sometimes a simple visit to the park’s manager who usually lives on-site is  enough to get the ball rolling.

Many senior citizens belong to groups like: veteran’s groups, AARP, Masonic  Lodges, temples, churches, senior volunteer programs, Shriners Clubs, garden  clubs, sewing clubs, antique auto clubs, Audubon Society, arts councils and  various political groups. Many of the more affluent seniors play golf and many  of the local courses have senior discount days where you can meet the senior  crowd.  They are usually members of well-known local clubs and organizations;  great for word of mouth networking.  Many times they will have their cars washed  while golfing.  Usually most municipal or older golf courses have senior day  discounts once per week.  Some seniors simply use the driving range during  senior day.  This is good as it provides good turn over in the parking lot.   Every hour new golfers come to hit balls.

Square dances are very popular amongst the older crowd.  A city with a  population of over 50,000 could have as many as four to five groups.  Each group  may have a membership of fifteen to one hundred people.

Any city or community worth its salt has a senior center.  It is imperative  to develop a good working relationship with the program director.  She (usually  a she) is in contact with all senior groups, activities, field trips and such.   Senior centers usually have racks of pamphlets near their entrance with  interesting information, schedules of upcoming events and lists of names, phone  numbers and addresses of the board of directors of various non-profit  organizations throughout the area.  You will be amazed at the incredible network  seniors have and how fast word of mouth information spreads.  Many seniors are  involved in more than one group or activity.  You may be at a bridge club  meeting washing cars one day and the next day you will get called by the  instructor at the square dance club.  Then the following day you wash cars for a  political action committee while volunteers stuff envelopes.  This can go on day  after day.  You can significantly speed up the word of mouth advertising with  this segment by showing up at various senior centers.

You must also remember that negative word of mouth topics permeate from these  groups too.  Don’t let this happen to you.  Spend an extra minute or two with  each senior customer.  Ask them if they wouldn’t mind giving two or three flyers  to their very best friends.  Usually they will.  Get to know each senior  customers by name; you’ll be glad you did.  Name dropping amongst seniors is  great, a they value relationships with friends with much higher regard than the  younger crowd does.  They will try to help you by offering advise about how you  might attain more business and places you might go to.  Acknowledge these  tidbits even if you think they are ridiculous.  It is sometimes the ridiculous  things that bring you to a new idea.  Even if you don’t want any new business,  listen anyway. Many of the greatest ideas we ever go to help our company  innovate came from talking with seniors with a slightly different perspective  than today’s rat race.

Accept all tips from seniors even if you think they can’t afford it.  This is  one of the greatest compliments they can give you.  It means they accept you.   This is not an easy thing for a senior to do, especially since younger  generations constantly fail to even acknowledge their existence and fail to meet  their work ethic expectations.  The gap has been widened before you got there  and it is your job to close the gap.  By uniting the seniors and your company  and uniting the kids of the multitude of fundraising groups you help, you can  unite the entire community.  You can be something everyone can talk about.   Grandparents and grandkids can all talk about your company.

Too get information on car wash fundraisers, search Google; “car wash  fundraisers”

“Lance Winslow” – Online Think  Tank forum board. If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives,  come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/. Lance is an online writer in  retirement.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lance_Winslow

American Red Cross Blood Services is Seeking Volunteers

April 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Volunteers are an integral part of our country’s fabric.  Their dedication is felt in thousands of communities, including Las Vegas.  Nationwide, the American Red Cross relies on 500,000 committed volunteers who represent 94 percent of the Red Cross’ workforce. And that doesn’t even count the millions of individuals who voluntarily donate blood.  There wouldn’t be a Red Cross without volunteers.

 

Would you like to do something that really matters?  Become a part of the Red Cross.  The Red Cross needs you.  Right now, the Red Cross is looking for several men and women to serve as volunteers.

 

According to Vickie Morgan, regional volunteer supervisor for the Red Cross Blood Services Region, “We would like to find some great committed people in Las Vegas to help us with a critical volunteer position.”

 

Volunteer couriers are needed to help transport blood from collection sites to a processing center, and from the center to local hospitals. If you like to drive and are dependable, able to read and follow maps, and work well with others, then this is a great volunteer opportunity.  Prospective drivers must have a valid driver’s license, be able to lift at least 45 pounds and be willing to make a commitment to serve for at least six months to one year.  Driver’s training is required and will be provided by the Red Cross. Morgan added, “We currently have shifts of varying lengths available to volunteers between 5:00 AM and midnight.”

 

To volunteer, or for more information, contact Vickie Morgan at 801.892.4011 or email Vickie.Morgan@redcross.org.

Benefits Of Joining A Senior Citizens Travel Club by James Redder

April 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Traveling is an interesting way of enjoying and spending time especially for  the senior citizens who are confined to their homes and do not have much of  physical activities. Older members of the family can have a lot of benefits by  taking small and big trips to various places. There are numerous advantages of  senior citizens travel. The best thing to do is to join one of the travel clubs  for seniors in the locality. This will allow you to spend time in useful travel  pursuits.

First, find out about the local clubs in the particular area. Search the  internet or find out from friends and acquaintances about such clubs. Beware of  scams and choose reputable ones. Be very careful and join a senior travel club  that has been there for quite a long time and that has a reputation. The  greatest benefit of joining such travel clubs is discounts on travel. Travel to  various places for a cheaper rate than traveling alone. This is very beneficial  for people who are living on a fixed monthly income and would like to  travel.

Another benefit is that the club can help to plan the trip in a better way.  Many people do not have the time or resources to plan the trip. For such people  this is a very helpful. Most of these clubs have regular meetings for discussing  various things including the travel plans. Be active in the meetings and suggest  various things that are interesting for the group. A good idea can be better  executed when it is shared and planned by a group of people belonging to the  travel club.

Another thing is that many senior citizens are lonely at home. When they  travel with the other members of the club, they can have a wonderful time  socializing with each other and making new friends. They can get rid of their  loneliness and enjoy life in a whole new way. Such clubs also have many  volunteers who take care of the seniors and their needs. So people who are on  their own can be benefited greatly.

Since the senior citizens club volunteers are well-trained, they know about  all the requirements of these people and take them to places that are really  meant for relaxing and enhancing the mood of the seniors. In order to enjoy all  these benefits find the best club from the locality and enroll in it. After  becoming a member it is easy to enjoy the various benefits offered by the senior  citizens travel club.

Next, now you are better informed on Senior Citizens Travel are you ready to get traveling? Read  more information concerning Senior Citizen Travel here.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=James_Redder

 

Crafts For the Elderly Can Be Fun Gift Ideas For Senior Citizens By Diane Carbo

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Combing crafts for the elderly, as a family project, can create fun  gift ideas for senior citizens. Developing an ongoing family  project will allow the aging senior to experience a new activity and relieve  boredom and stress.

Spending time with your aging senior is probably the most precious gift you  can give them. Here are a few ideas that would make great gifts and also have  the benefit of getting to know each other on a more intimate level.

Consider asking your senior citizen to get out all the old photos and  important mementos that they have saved over the years. It may be old letters,  special cards, things that have some significance or meaning to them. The senior  citizen may want to ask extended family members to do the same.

Ask  them to take the pictures and start a journal. Write down what they  remember about the individuals in the pictures, maybe it will spark a memory of  a time long forgotten. If you have a senior that has difficulty writing, get  them a recorder to tape the information. You may ask if they would be interested  in taking a creative writing class there they can learn how to write about their  life or their memories. You can then take their writing and create a special  bound book for them.

If you have a senior that has started with mental decline, you may be  surprised how much they will be able to share about the past, even if they  cannot remember what they had for breakfast.

Everyone wants to feel as of they have made a small difference in the lives  of their loved ones. Showing interest in their past will spark fond memories and  create a wealth of knowledge for your future generations.

More Crafts for the Elderly are Some Fun Gift Ideas for Senior  Citizens…

There are several opportunities you can use the photos, the journal and the  sparked memories. Depending on your interest and commitment level and the  abilities of the senior citizen there are many avenues you can take with all  this new found information.

For example, The National Public Radio has established a nonprofit  organization, called StoryCorps®. This project is one of the largest oral  history projects of its kind. This was a system developed just for those who  wish to record and save stories from their lives. Each conversation is recorded  on a free CD to share with others and your story is preserved at the Library of  Congress. The best part is, it is free! The senior citizens in your life will be  excited and honored to preserve some of their history for future  generations.

Consider creating a photo family tree for the senior citizen. Is the aging  senior interested in genealogy? Do they have an old family bible or written  history of past generations? If not, consider starting a genealogy project and  use some of the pictures to create a photo family tree. Of course some of this  research can be done online. The USGenWeb Project is run by volunteers to assure  that there is free genealogy websites for genealogical research in every county  and every state of the United  States. This Project is non-commercial and fully  committed to free genealogy access for everyone. It is a great way to spend time  with the senior in your life and learn about the past family history.

Another project you may use with all the pictures is to purchase a portable  DVD player, one that can play DVD+R/RW. Then take the photos and scan them to  make them digital photographs. Turn the pictures into a slide show, with  captions, titles or even audio of the pictures. Burn the pictures into a  DVD.

It is important that you provide step by step instructions, in large print,  on how to use the DVD player for the technologically challenged senior  citizen.

Scrapbooking is another alternative for utilizing and preserving the pictures  and other mementos. This a is   project that will give the senior citizen in  your life the opportunity to create their story about their life with their  personal touch. You can provide the supplies and classes so that they can learn  this new found activity.

No matter what avenue you take in providing crafts for the elderly make them fun. You can get creative with gift ideas for senior citizens,  but don’t forget to make it special and meaningful. When the project is done,  don’t forget, no mater how old one gets to be, there is still joy and excitement  in opening a present. Celebrate the finished project with a party or  “unveiling.” And don’t forget to wrap the finished project!

Diane Carbo Registered Nurse has more than thirty five years in the nursing  field. Her experience as a geriatric care manager, makes her uniquely qualified  to help those who want to live out their lives in their own homes. That decision  may be made when you are 20, 30, 40 or in fact at any age, with sooner rather  than later being ideal. Diane has developed a web site to make people aware of  issues and options. You will find extensive helpful information that will be  continually updated. Please visit Diane’s web site and learn more about good gift-ideas-for-senior-citizens Sign up for “The Caring  Advocate” her free newlsetter and take advantage of a complimentary e-course Advocating  For Yourself and Others

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2763074

AARP: George Davis Appointed AARP State President

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

George Davis Appointed AARP State President

African-American Business Executive is Top Advocate for AARP’s 3.1 million members California

PASADENA, Calif., April 3, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — George Davis of Los Angeles, CA, has been appointed AARP California State President. Prior
to his appointment, Davis was acting state president and served for two
years on the state’s Executive Council, a five-member council that provides
direction and leadership in carrying out AARP’s strategic priorities in
California.

Davis came to AARP as a distinguished executive in the broadcasting and
entertainment industry.  He is currently Principal of Davis Broadband Group, a Culver City based consulting firm that advises media and entertainment
companies on digital content distribution.  Earlier in his career, Davis was
managing television technical operations in the US and Asia at Technicolor
and Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Throughout his career, Davis has been actively involved in
community and public service.  In 1999, he was appointed by Governor Pete
Wilson to the board of the California African American Museum.  A few years
later Davis was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to represent the
public as a member of the Board of Governors of the California State Bar.  He
is also a board member of New Directions, a nonprofit organization that helps
homeless veterans.

As volunteer state president, Davis will lead the California Executive Council and work in partnership with State Director Katie Hirning and in collaboration with other volunteers and staff to achieve AARP’s strategic priorities in the state.

“We are thrilled to have George as our new state president,” said State Director Katie Hirning. “He’s a long-time advocate for small businesses and a strong supporter of
technology and outreach to diverse populations.  His knowledge and experience
in these areas will greatly benefit AARP’s more than 3 million California
members.”

Davis is an avid hiker and enjoys collecting rare books when traveling abroad.  He resides in Los Angeles and has two adult daughters and a son attending college.

AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people turn their goals and dreams into real possibilities, strengthens communities and fights for the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare,
employment security and retirement planning. We advocate for consumers in the
marketplace by selecting products and services of high quality and value to carry the AARP name as well as help our members obtain discounts on a wide range of products, travel, and services.  A trusted source for lifestyle tips, news and educational information, AARP produces AARP The Magazine, the world’s largestcirculation magazine; AARP Bulletin; www.aarp.org

AARP TV & Radio; AARP Books; and AARP en Espanol, a bilingual news source.  AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to political campaigns or candidates.  The AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older persons in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. AARP has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of
Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Learn more at www.aarp.org

.

Fashion Show Salutes Youth Volunteers For Exceptional Community Service

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

More than 30 high school young men and women from National Charity League Las Vegas and

Young Men’s Service League take the runway at Fashion Show

 

WHAT:                        In recognition of thousands of hours of community service performed by local youth, Fashion Show hosts a special runway show to salute and recognize the good works and community contributions of two local youth service organizations – National Charity League (NCL) Las Vegas chapter and Young Men’s Service League (YMSL).  More than 30 young men and women from area high schools and members of these organizations will participate in a special runway show underwritten and hosted by Fashion Show, Best Agency and Faiss Foley Warren Public Relations.   The young women and men, along with their mothers, are members of the National Charity League and Young Men’s Service League Las Vegas chapters, respectively, and have collectively performed thousands of hours of community service at dozens of non-profit organizations in our community.  NCL’s mission is to promote volunteerism, cultivate leadership and provide an opportunity for mothers and teen daughters to forge a bond through service.  YMSL encourages young men and their mothers to improve their relationship by pursuing philanthropic opportunities in their community.

 

The show is free to the public with special reserved seating for NCL and YMSL members.

 

WHEN:                       Saturday, February 23, 2013

Runway shows at 1 and 3 p.m.  

 

WHERE:                    On the runway in the Great Hall

Fashion Show, 3200 Las Vegas Boulevard South

 

FASHION SHOW:    

Fashion Show is the largest shopping destination on Las Vegas Boulevard.  It is located at 3200 Las Vegas Blvd., South and can be accessed from Spring Mountain Road, just west of Las Vegas Boulevard or via Mel Torme Way, just off of Industrial Road.  Anchors include Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue, Macy’s, Dillard’s, Bloomingdale’s Home, Nordstrom and Forever 21.  Underground, covered, garage and valet parking are offered. Please call Fashion Show at 702-369-8382, or visit www.thefashionshow.com for more information.

 

NATIONAL CHARITY LEAGUE:

Established in Los Angeles, California in 1925, and incorporated in 1958, National Charity League, Inc. is the premier mother-daughter organization, serving women and their daughters in grades 7-12. The NCL Experience inspires and empowers women to succeed as confident, well-rounded and socially aware contributors in their communities.  Currently the membership organization has 168 Chapters in 17 states, providing valuable philanthropic, leadership, and cultural experiences to its members and striving to meet critical needs of local communities through hands-on volunteer support. For more information, visit our Website at www.nationalcharityleague.org.

 

YOUNG MEN’S SERVICE LEAGUE:

Founded in Plano, Texas in 2001 by Pam and Julie Rosener, Young Men’s Service League is an organization that allows mothers and their high school sons an opportunity to work together in support of those in need within the community.  The National YMSL organization was formed in 2005 and has grown to over 30 chapters in five states.  In addition to volunteering and completing service hours, the young men are required to attend meetings where they develop leadership, social and life/practice skills as well as learn about health/nutrition and making smart decisions in life.

The Home Depot Foundation to Announce Significant Grant to Veterans Village

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

HELP LAUNCH VEGAS LOVES VETERANS CAMPAIGN

 WHAT:                 Fred Wacker, COO of The Home Depot Foundation, will announce the awarding of a significant grant to Veterans Village Las Vegas at a brief ceremony that will also include dozens of associate volunteers from The Home Depot.  The Home Depot Foundation, which has been actively engaged in supporting VeteransVillage since its inception last year, is increasing its financial support to help complete a comprehensive renovation of VeteransVillage’s physical facility, a former Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms.

 

A 103-day fundraising campaign for Veterans Village Las Vegas – VEGAS LOVES VETERANS – will launch that day to encourage locals to donate what they can up to $103 ($1 per day from Valentine’s Day through Memorial Day 2013) – to show support of veterans from all conflicts who have defended our freedoms over the decades. ( www.vvlv.org – click on the Vegas Loves Veterans icon or donate button)

 

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

 

WHEN:                 Thursday, February 14

                                10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

 

WHERE:               Veterans Village Las Vegas

1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South (Just south of Charleston Blvd. on the west side of the street)

Las Vegas, NV89104

 

WHO:                   Fred Wacker, COO, The Home Depot Foundation

Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman

Las Vegas City Councilman Bob Coffin

                                Arnold Stalk, founder and visionary, Veterans Village Las Vegas

 

About Veterans Village:

Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel.  It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed.  Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need.  SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents.  www.vvlv.org

 

About The Home Depot Foundation:

The Home Depot Foundation is dedicated to improving the homes of U.S. military veterans through financial and volunteer resources to help nonprofit organizations. The Foundation has committed $80 million to these efforts over five years.  Through Team Depot, the company’s associate-led volunteer program, thousands of Home Depot associates volunteer their time and talents to positively transform neighborhoods and perform basic repairs and modifications to homes and facilities serving veterans with critical housing needs. Since its formation in 2002, The Home Depot Foundation has granted more than $340 million to nonprofit organizations improving homes and lives in local communities. To learn more and see our associates in action, visit www.homedepotfoundation.org.

The Home Depot Foundation to Announce Significant Grant to Veterans Village

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

HELP LAUNCH VEGAS LOVES VETERANS CAMPAIGN

WHAT: Fred Wacker, COO of The Home Depot Foundation, will announce the awarding of a significant grant to Veterans Village Las Vegas at a brief ceremony that will also include dozens of associate volunteers from The Home Depot. The Home Depot Foundation, which has been actively engaged in supporting Veterans Village since its inception last year, is increasing its financial support to help complete a comprehensive renovation of Veterans Village’s physical facility, a former Econo Lodge Motel with 120 rooms.

A 103-day fundraising campaign for Veterans Village Las Vegas – VEGAS LOVES VETERANS – will launch that day to encourage locals to donate what they can up to $103 ($1 per day from Valentine’s Day through Memorial Day 2013) – to show support of veterans from all conflicts who have defended our freedoms over the decades. ( www.vvlv.org – click on the Vegas Loves Veterans icon or donate button)

In addition to providing temporary housing for vets and their families, Veterans Village provides a comprehensive roster of services to vets through partnerships with other community organizations and government agencies, including employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events.

WHEN: Thursday, February 14
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.

WHERE: Veterans Village Las Vegas
1150 Las Vegas Blvd. South (Just south of Charleston Blvd. on the west side of the street)
Las Vegas, NV 89104

WHO: Fred Wacker, COO, The Home Depot Foundation
Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman
Las Vegas City Councilman Bob Coffin
Arnold Stalk, founder and visionary, Veterans Village Las Vegas

About Veterans Village:
Veterans Village is located at 1150 Las Vegas Boulevard in a repurposed Econo Lodge motel. It serves as a temporary housing facility for U.S. veterans and their families and provides a comprehensive and holistic roster of services to help vets heal and succeed. Services are provided through public and private collaborative partnerships with community organizations and government agencies and include housing, nutrition, life skills training, employment training and referrals, continuing education and degree programs, exercise training, medical services, mental health counseling and special veteran-centric activities and events. Veterans Village is managed by SHARE, a 501(c)3 organization founded in 1994 by Arnold Stalk and Karin Rogers to provide affordable housing for individuals in need. SHARE oversees all operations of services for Veterans Village residents. www.vvlv.org

About The Home Depot Foundation:
The Home Depot Foundation is dedicated to improving the homes of U.S. military veterans through financial and volunteer resources to help nonprofit organizations. The Foundation has committed $80 million to these efforts over five years. Through Team Depot, the company’s associate-led volunteer program, thousands of Home Depot associates volunteer their time and talents to positively transform neighborhoods and perform basic repairs and modifications to homes and facilities serving veterans with critical housing needs. Since its formation in 2002, The Home Depot Foundation has granted more than $340 million to nonprofit organizations improving homes and lives in local communities. To learn more and see our associates in action, visit www.homedepotfoundation.org.

Free Personal Income Tax Form Preparation Assistance At City Of Las Vegas Senior Centers

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Trained Volunteers Will Assist Seniors And Lower-Income Residents

Volunteers from AARP will offer residents age 50 and older free assistance with personal income tax form preparation and electronic filing at four city active adult and senior centers beginning in February. In addition, participants in the Internal Revenue Service Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program will offer similar free assistance to Nevada residents at the Doolittle Senior Center starting Feb. 19. Income restrictions will apply to qualify for assistance. Advance appointments are required at all locations. Bring a copy of your 2011 income tax return and all of your applicable 2012 paperwork to the appointment. Call a center below between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. weekdays to schedule an appointment. Centers will be closed Feb. 18 for holiday observance.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, Feb. 1-April 12, by appointment only.
Las Vegas Senior Center, 451 E. Bonanza Road, (702) 229-6454.
Call 229-6454 for details and to make an appointment.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Mondays and Thursdays, Feb. 4-April 11, by appointment only.
Centennial Hills Active Adult Center, 6601 N. Buffalo Drive, (702) 229-1702.
Call 229-1702 for information and appointments.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesday afternoons, Feb. 5-April 9, by appointment only.
Lieburn Senior Center, 6230 Garwood Ave., (702) 229-1600.
Call 229-1600 for information and appointments.

AARP Free Tax Form Preparation (ages 50+)
Tuesdays, Feb.12-April 9, by appointment only.
East Las Vegas Community Center, 250 N. Eastern, (702) 229-1515.
Call 229-1515 for information and to make an appointment.

VITA Free Tax Form Preparation
Tuesday-Thursday; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Feb. 19-April 11; by appointment only.
Doolittle Senior Center, 1930 N. J St., (702) 229-6125.
The VITA program is designed to help low- and moderate-income taxpayers complete their annual tax returns at no cost. All ages with income under $49,000 are welcome. Call (702) 229-6125 for appointments after Feb. 5.

National Nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation Joins Forces with Parent-giving to Increase Awareness of Contributions of Caregivers

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

The national nonprofit Twilight Wish Foundation is pleased to announce a new partnership with Parentgiving.com, based in Montclair, New Jersey. Keith Maddox, CEO of Parentgiving, presented a check for $10,000 to Cass Forkin, founder of Twilight Wish Foundation at their Doylestown, PA offices on January 10, 2013. The funding received from Parentgiving will be used to create a program to recognize and reward deserving senior caregivers.

“As Twilight Wish celebrates the 9th anniversary of our first wish granted, we are thrilled to be embarking on a new path with Parentgiving, a company that shares our dedication to meeting the needs of the elderly,” said Forkin. “There are over 42 million caregivers in the U.S. and many of them struggle with their own physical, financial and mental needs. The main goal of this partnership is to increase awareness of the contributions of caregivers and recognize all they do for their loved ones.”

Said Maddox, “Parentgiving recognizes the strains people face when a senior family member needs care due to health and/or mobility issues. We applaud Twilight Wish for all their work to improve the lives of seniors and are thrilled to partner with them on a program to make caregivers’ wishes come true.” Parentgiving, which sells thousands of caregiving products for seniors, has arranged for additional ongoing contributions to Twilight Wish through a special coupon code, available on the Twilight Wish website, which gives customers deep discounts and Twilight Wish 5% of each sale.

Twilight Wish Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization whose mission is to honor and enrich the lives of deserving seniors through wish granting celebrations that connect generations. Since its founding in 2003, Twilight Wish has granted over 1,865 individual wishes to deserving, low-income seniors, thanks to volunteers, corporate and community involvement, and donations. Recent wishes granted include a visit from a string band for a nursing home resident’s 89th birthday party, transporting a nursing home resident to Christmas Eve dinner with her family and hearing aids for an Army veteran who wished to be able to hear his grandchildren’s voices. For more information on Twilight Wish Foundation, visit its website at www.twilightwish.org or call 1-215-230-8777 ext. 104.

Parentgiving.com is a fast-growing online destination for seniors and their caregivers. The Parentgiving Store offers thousands of homecare products, medical supplies and incontinence products, delivered fast right to the home. The store’s top sellers include durable medical equipment, such as walkers, bed rails, bath safety bars, incontinence items, and daily living aids. Parentgiving.com also offers a wealth of free information on eldercare, including original articles and news, Q&A with experts on aging, senior housing and homecare directories, and other aging-related resources. For more information please visit www.Parentgiving.com or follow them on Twitter.

CONTACT: Mary Farrell, Director of Community Relations, Twilight Wish, 215-230-8777, ext. 103

AARP Launches New YouTube Series, The Cheap Life with Jeff Yeager

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

AARP Savings Expert’s Weekly Series Helps People Get the Most for their Money
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Today, AARP launched the latest in its original video series on YouTube, “The Cheap Life with Jeff Yeager,” featuring AARP savings expert Jeff Yeager. During each weekly episode, Yeager, who is also known as the “Ultimate Cheapskate,” will discuss tips and tricks on how consumers of all ages can pay less for just about everything, save for retirement, get the most for their money and up-cycle or reuse everyday items through creative repurposing.
(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20070209/NYF043LOGO)
“We know our members want programming that features fun and everyday ways to save,” said Larry Gannon, AARP Vice President of TV and Radio Programming. “‘The Cheap Life’ is one way AARP is meeting the wants and needs of our members and others—by helping them and their families save real money and live the life they want, but at a fraction of the cost.”
For the past four years, Jeff Yeager has been a popular contributor to AARP via online articles and “savings challenges,” print articles in AARP’s Bulletin and “AARP The Magazine,” AARP television series and web-only videos and a weekly blog. Past videos featuring Jeff are among the most viewed and many of his articles are among the top read articles in the money section of www.aarp.org.
“Our research shows that AARP members are using YouTube to view videos online,” Gannon said. “And through this popular interface, ‘The Cheap Life’ delivers fun and engaging ideas on how to enjoy life more by spending less. Subscribers to The Cheap Life YouTube Channel will be able to interact directly with Jeff and have their tips and savings ideas shared with a worldwide audience.”
Each three to five minute episode of “The Cheap Life” will link back to relevant articles, blog posts and other helpful tools found on www.aarp.org. Episodes may include:
The Repurposing Challenge—Encouraging viewers to find multiple uses for everyday household items;
Don’t Throw That Away!—Jeff shares one of his many favorite repurposing ideas;
Cheapskate Shout-out—Jeff acknowledges people who have embraced the “cheap life;” and,
Cheapskate Hall of Fame/Shame—Jeff identifies people who have excelled or failed at being frugal.
“The Cheap Life” is part of a customized AARP YouTube destination that streamlines the user experience and better organizes the more than 2,000 videos available for site visitors. In 2013, AARP will continue to expand its online content offerings by developing premium original programming for the AARP YouTube channel in the form of weekly series focusing on the areas of money, health and beauty, technology and travel.
Consumers can subscribe to “The Cheap Life” for free by visiting www.YouTube.com/CheapLifeChannel and becoming a registered YouTube user. The first episode, “Travel Tips for the Frugal,” can be found by visiting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zob8NFodEtw.
AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people 50+ have independence, choice and control in ways that are beneficial to them and society as a whole. AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to either political campaigns or candidates. We produce AARP The Magazine, the definitive voice for Americans 50+ and the world’s largest-circulation magazine; AARP Bulletin, the go-to news source for the 50+ audience; www.aarp.org ; AARP VIVA, a bilingual lifestyle multimedia platform addressing the interests and needs of Hispanic Americans; and national television and radio programming including My Generation and Inside E Street. The AARP Foundation is an affiliated charity that provides security, protection, and empowerment to older persons in need with support from thousands of volunteers, donors, and sponsors. AARP has staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Learn more at www.aarp .org .

CONTACT: David L. Allen, +1-202-434-2560, media@aarp.org

Civil Air Patrol’s first Spaatz award recipient dies

January 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Civil Air Patrol’s first Spaatz award recipient dies after distinguished public service career
Decorated CAP cadet from Michigan became a skilled Air Force combat pilot who flew with the Thunderbirds and served as a trusted congressional aide

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. – Douglas C. Roach, the first recipient of Civil Air Patrol’s highest cadet award, the General Carl A. Spaatz Award, died Jan. 11 at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., from complications related to cancer. He was 70.
“The Spaatz Association wishes to express its deep regret and condolences in the passing of Doug Roach,” said retired U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Ted Bowlds, the association’s president. “As the first Spaatz award recipient, Doug certainly set the standard in the qualities represented in all Spaatz recipients that followed. We have him and his family in our thoughts and prayers.”
Roach made Civil Air Patrol and Spaatz history as a Michigan Wing cadet in the 1960s. He was born in Romulus, Mich., on Nov. 18, 1942.
“Doug was handpicked by Jack Sorenson (CAP’s cadet program leader at the time) to be tested for the first Spaatz,” said Col. Larry Trick, a Spaatz recipient and former president of the association. “Jack noticed Doug in 1962 at the National Cadet Competition, where he was commander of the Michigan Wing drill team that won the competition that year.”
Trick said the Spaatz test in its infancy was handwritten, with mostly essay-type questions. Today the test has evolved into a more sophisticated, multi-step process, but the Spaatz award remains the most coveted of CAP’s cadet honors.
Named after the first chief of staff of the Air Force and the first chairman of the CAP National Board, the Spaatz award is presented to cadets who demonstrate excellence in leadership, character, fitness and aerospace education. Cadets typically qualify for the award after devoting an average of five years to progress through 16 achievements in the CAP Cadet Program.
Once a cadet achieves the award, he or she is entitled to the grade of cadet colonel. On average, only two cadets in 1,000 earn the Spaatz award. Since the award’s inception in 1964, CAP has presented the Spaatz award to less than 1,900 cadets.
Roach became a highly decorated officer and skilled U.S. Air Force pilot. After flying 516 combat missions during several tours in Vietnam between 1969 and 1972, he was a pilot with the Air Force flight performance team, the Thunderbirds, from 1973-75. He began with the aerial demonstration team flying Thunderbird #6 when the team flew the F-4 Phantom and he served as the team’s logistics officer. Roach retired from the Air Force with the rank of colonel.
Despite the notoriety he gained above the clouds in the Air Force, Brig. Gen. Richard L. Anderson said Roach was grounded in the achievements of his youth, which included his “place of honor in the annals of CAP history” as the first Spaatz recipient.
“I remember meeting Doug for the first time at a Spaatz Association event soon after the organization was created in the mid-1990s,” said Anderson, past president of the association and former CAP national commander who now chairs the organization’s Board of Governors. “Although Doug’s professional military and congressional staff career precluded his remaining active in CAP, he remained dedicated to the purposes of the CAP Cadet Program and attributed CAP with his later accomplishments in life.”
“He was a hero to me and many cadets in the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s,” said Trick. “Often, we would see him on the Hill during National CAP Legislative Day. He always had a great smile and handshake for the cadets.”
Roach earned a bachelor’s degree in government at the University of Michigan and, after his distinguished service in the Air Force, a master’s degree in national security studies from Georgetown University.
He continued his career of public service on Capitol Hill, most recently as the longtime staff director for the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces.
In his obituary this week, Congressional Quarterly’s Roll Call said Roach was a cornerstone of every defense authorization law since 1991, whether as a professional staff member on the veteran defense panel, or its staff director since 2001.
“His work was key to developing the smart weapons we use today,” said Trick.
The longtime congressional aide also was noted for serving both Democrats and Republicans, working through important national security legislation. In the Roll Call obituary, Rep. Michael R. Turner, the Ohio Republican who chairs the Tactical Air and Land Forces panel, said, “Doug Roach was a trusted counselor to members on both sides of the aisle for many years. He always gave us his best advice, regardless of party interest or agenda.”
Roach’s boss, House Armed Services Committee Chairman Howard “Buck” McKeon, R-Calif., called him “a selfless servant and true hero.”

Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than 61,000 members nationwide, operating a fleet of 550 aircraft. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 80 lives annually. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to nearly 27,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet programs. CAP received the World Peace Prize in 2011 and has been performing missions for America for 71 years. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit www.gocivilairpatrol.com or www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.

Contact info: Julie DeBardelaben – jdebardelaben@capnhq.gov – 334-953-7748, ext. 250
Steve Cox – scox@capnhq.gov – 334-953-7748, ext. 251

Renown Health Board Member and Volunteer Recognized with NHA Awards

September 24, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Lawson Fox, Renown Health board member, and Dinah O’Brien, Renown Health volunteer, were presented with awards at the Nevada Hospital Association (NHA) annual Membership Meeting Awards Luncheon late last week at the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe. Fox received the Award for Trustee Excellence and O’Brien receive the Excellence in Volunteerism Award.

The two awards recognize one urban hospital and one rural hospital trustee and volunteer who have made an exemplary commitment to his/her hospital and contributions to improve his/her hospital’s service to its patients and community. Since their establishment, these awards have recognized a number of distinguished health care leaders throughout Nevada.

Fox has served on Renown Health boards for more than 8 years. During his tenure, he has overseen the implementation of quality tracking mechanisms for delivering quality care in the emergency departments of Renown Regional, Renown South Meadows Medical Center and the health network in general. In addition, his efforts of monitoring employee survey data have helped to provide consistent exceptional patient experiences.

O’Brien has been the volunteer coordinator of the Pet Therapy Program at Renown Health since the Healing Arts Program began more than 16 years ago. She is also a Volunteer Patient Visitor, a program that began in September of 2011 designed to empower volunteers to help with the patient experience.
In addition, she considers her years at the main reception desk at Renown Regional among her most significant contributions.

“Lawson and Dinah’s support throughout the community is truly a gift to northern Nevada. They are tremendous assets here at Renown,” said Jim Miller, president and CEO of Renown Health. “These honors are well deserved and both Lawson and Dinah should be commended for the genuine difference they have made and the many lives they have touched.”

In addition to individual awards, both Renown Regional Medical Center and Renown South Meadows Medical Center received NHA awards for quality. These awards mean medical professionals working at Renown South Meadows and Renown Regional provided treatment known to get the best results for patients.

Formally established in 1960 and incorporated in 1971, the Nevada Hospital Association (NHA) is a not-for-profit, statewide trade association representing 100 percent of Nevada’s acute care hospitals along with psychiatric, rehabilitation and other specialty hospitals as well as health-related agencies and organizations throughout the state. Allied with the American Hospital Association, NHA is an independent organization headquartered in Reno, Nevada. As a membership organization, NHA serves as a statewide resource and leader in promoting public understanding of, and support for, the health care system serving Nevada’s communities. In addition, NHA serves its members by providing education, information and representation and by serving as a catalyst in collaborative efforts to produce quality, adequately financed health care in Nevada.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Volunteers: A Key To Curing Alzheimer’s Disease

February 17, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Volunteer Northern Nevada

November 5, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: General 

Nevada SMP – Senior Medicare Patrol

1-888-838-7305 or 702-486-3403

Please call for information

Nevada Volunteers

639 Isbell Rd., Suite 220, Reno, NV 89509

775-825-1900, www.nevadavolunteers.org

 

Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)

Sanford Center for Aging, UNR,

Mail Stop 0146, Reno, NV 89557-0038

775-784-1807

 

Senior Outreach Services (SOS)

401 West 2nd St., Ste 101, Reno, NV 89503

775-784-7506

To aid 60’s and older with difficulties to live                       on their own. Social Support, Driving to

Dr. Appointments, Errands, Activities

Nevada-Senior-Guide Support Groups Northern Nevada

Alcoholics Anonymous – Central Office

436 S. Rock Blvd., Sparks, NV 89531

(775) 355-1151, www.NNIG.org

Call for meeting info, Referrals

 

Alzheimer’s Association of Northern Nevada

1301 Cordone Ave, #180, Reno, NV  89502

775-786-8061, www.Alz.org

Programs and services available include

support groups and educational workshops.

 

American Cancer Society

691 Sierra Rose Dr., Reno, NV 89511

(775) 329-0600, www.cancer.org, Hours 24/7

Referrals, Road to Recovery program,

transportation

 

American Diabeties Association

18 Stewart St., Reno, NV 89501

775-856-3839 OR 1-800-379-3839

Support groups – 2nd Tues of the month                                6:30pm-7:30pm. Emergency medical  program.

 

American Lung Association of Nevada

10615 Double R Blvd., Reno, NV 89521

(775) 829-5864

Newsletter, need volunteers, lung information

 

American Heart Association

155 Country Estates Circle, Ste. 200

Reno, NV 89511, 775-322-7065, heart.org

Heart Info, Donations welcome

 

American Parkinson Disease Assoc. (APDA), Inc.

975 Kirman Ave., Reno, NV 89502

(775) 328-1715, www.apdaparkinson.org

Info and referrals, Veterans welcome

 

Better Breathers Club

The American Lung Association of Nevada

10615 Double “R” Blvd., Reno, NV 89521

(775) 829-5864

Registered Nurse & Therapist Help Call Center

(800) 548-8252

Community Health Program – Urban Indians                          Outreach

745 W. Moana Ln., Ste. 375, Reno, NV 89502

775-788-7600

AA Support Groups. Call for information.

 

Continuum Caregiver, Children of Aging Parents                               Education & Caregiver Support Groups

3700 Grant Dr., Reno, NV 89509

(775) 829-4700

Adult Day Program, Support groups

 

Family Resource Center

1950 Villanova Dr., Reno, NV 89502

(775) 321-3185, Call for Appointment

Referrals, Emergency Assistance

 

State of Nevada Suicide Prevention

Reno, NV, (775) 784-8090, Reno Crisis

1 (800) 273-8255 Option 1

1 (800) 992-5757 Crisis Line

Substance Abuse: 800-450-9530

Reno 775-825-4357 Substance Abuse Help Line

Nevada-Senior-Guide Education Services Directory – Northern Nevada Rural

Washoe County Library System

(775) 327-8300, www.washoecountylibrary.us

Your public library is the place for print and electronic resources, literacy and cultural

programs, group technology classes, and
personal research assistance. We have 12 physical libraries and once virtual library,  please visit us online for information on hours and locations. www.washoe.lib.nv.us

Resource Lending Center – Churchill

County Club 60 Senior Center

310 E. Court, Fallon, NV 89406

(775) 423-7096, ext. 22. Provides info and  topic literature, books, assistive aids

Sanford Center for Aging – UNR

(775) 784-4774 Washoe County

1664 N. Virginia St., Mail Stop 146

Center for Molecular Medicine, Reno, NV 89557

www.unr.edu/sanford

Develops innovative ideas, educational and
research opportunities, and community
partnerships. A scholarship program and                              Continuing Education Workshops are available,                      SR Outreach, Volunteers, RSVP Program

Nevada-Senior-Guide Support Groups Directory – Northern Nevada

ALS of Nevada

1575 Delucchi Lane, Suite 223, Reno, NV

702-787-9343

Respite, Support Groups

Alcoholics Anonymous – Central Office

436 S. Rock Blvd., Sparks, NV 89531

(775) 355-1151, call for meeting info

American Cancer Society

691 Sierra Rose Dr. #A, Reno, NV 89511

(775) 329-0609, www.cancer.org

Referrals, transportation

American Lung Association of Nevada

10615 Double R Blvd. Suite #100, Reno, NV 89521

(775) 829-5864

Newsletter, need volunteers, lung information

American Parkinson Disease Assoc. (APDA), Inc.

975 Kirman Ave., Reno, NV 89502

(775) 328-1715, www.apdaparkinson.org

Info and referrals, Veterans Welcome

Better Breathers Club

The American Lung Association of Nevada

10615 Double “R” Blvd #100, Reno, NV 89521

(775) 829-5864

Registered Nurse & Therapist Help Call Center

(800) 548-8252

Children of Aging Parents Education & Support Group

3700 Grant Dr., Ste. A, Reno, NV 89509

(775) 829-4700

Adult Day Program, Support groups

Continuum Caregiver Support Group

3700 Grant, Ste. A., Reno, NV 89509

(775) 829-4700

Family Resource Center

1950 Villanova Dr., Reno, NV 89502

(775) 321-5037

Referrals, Emergency Assistance

Senior Outreach Services (SOS)

401 West 2nd St., Reno, NV 89503

775-784-7506

To aid 60’s and older with difficulties to live on their

own. Social Support, Driving, Dr. Appointments,

Errands, Activities

State of Nevada Suicide Prevention

Reno, NV

(775) 784-8085 Business, 1 (800) 992-5757 Crisis Line

Nevada-Senior-Guide Volunteer Opportunities Directory – Southern Nevada

American Diabetes Foundation

702-369-9995, www.diabetes.org/volunteer

Blind Center of Nevada

(702) 642-6000, Call for info

 

Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada

702-382-0721.

Opportunities available for volunteers

 

Clark County Library District

(702) 734-7323 – Looking for volunteers

 

Comfort Hospice Care

6655 W. Sahara, #B 114, LV, NV 89146

Contact – Debbie Gregory. Volunteers to work                  with terminally ill patients and their families

 

DISCOVERY Children’s Museum

(702) 382-3445

www.DiscoveryKids.org

Volunteers help on the museum floor

during school tours and other fun-filled

museum events. Volunteers can also provide                        mentoring and tutoring to our teenage

volunteers. Hrs: 10am-5pm, Sun Noon-5pm

 

Family Home Hospice

8655 S. Eastern, Las Vegas, NV 89123

(702) 560-2853. Varied volunteer

opportunities. Pays standard mileage rate.

 

Foster Grandparent Program Catholic Charities

(702) 382-0721. Volunteers provide mentoring,
tutoring to children in day care centers,                              schools & protective services.

Helping Hands of Henderson

702-616-6554. Volunteers to help with

transportation for seniors to doctor

appointments, grocery shopping and errands

Helping Hands of Vegas Valley

2320 Paseo Del Prado Bldg. B #204

LV, NV 89102, (702) 633-7264, www.hhovv.org

Referral Service, Education, Respite Care,                          Volunteer Transportation, The Pantry,

Wheelchair van available

 

Infinity Hospice Care

6330 S. Jones Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89118

Contact Nikki Ellis 702-880-7002

Volunteer.lv@infinityhospicecare.com

 

Lend a Hand

(702) 294-2363

Opportunities available for Volunteers

 

Medicare S.H.I.P.

702-486-3478. Receive training in Medicare                          benefits & assist with questions and problems

 

Nevada SMP – SR Medicare Patrol

(702) 486-3403, 1-888-838-7305

Medicare Fraud and abuse prevention project

 

Safe House

(702) 451-4203. Volunteers to help with elder                    abuse & domestic violence

 

Senior Companion Program/Catholic

Charities of Southern Nevada

(702) 382-0721. Volunteers provide

companionship to homebound seniors

 

S. Nevada American Cancer Society

6165 S. Rainbow Blvd., LV, NV 89118

(702) 891-9009. Need drivers to take cancer                        patients to and from treatments. Also, other               opportunities available.

 

The Center

702-733-9800. Volunteers needed for the
information desk, event staffing,

administrative tasks and more.

 

Three Square Food

4190 N. Pecos Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89115

(702) 644-3663. Volunteers welcome

8am-5pm

Nevada-Senior-Guide Support Groups Directory – Southern Nevada

Adult Diabetes Education & Mgmnt.

West Charleston Library

6301 W. Charleston Blvd., LV, NV 89146

(702) 349-7370, www.diabetes-lasvegas.org

Support Group 2nd Tues. each month, 6-7:30pm

 

Alcoholics Anonymous

1431 E. Charleston Blvd., #15, LV, NV 89104-1734

702-598-1888, www.LVcentraloffice.org

Meeting Schedules, Telephone Reassurance,

12 Step-calls, literature

ALS of Nevada

4220 S. Maryland Pkwy., Bldg. B, Ste 404

Las Vegas, NV 89119

(702) 777-0500

Support Groups, ALS Clinic, Medical

Equipment to Lend (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)

 

Alzheimer’s Association S. Nevada Chapter

5190 S. Valley View Blvd.,#104, LV, NV 89118

(702) 248-2770, www.alzdsw.org

Referral Services, Resources, Support Groups,

24-hour Help Line 1-800-272-3900, respite
care, safe return program, education on
Dementia & Alzheimers

American Cancer Society

6165 S. Rainbow Blvd., Bldg. 12, LV, NV 89118

702-891-9009, www.cancer.org. Referral                             Service, call for appointment & event info.

American Diabetes Association

For diabeties info, call 702-369-9995 or

801-363-3024 x 7069, 888-342-2383

Resource/Referrals, Advocacy

American Lung Association

3552 W. Cheyenne Ave. #130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 431-6333, www.lungusa.org

Literature, Support Group, Better Breathers
Club, Freedom from smoking club

American Heart & Stroke Association

4445 S. Jones Blvd.,Ste. B1, LV, NV 89103

(702) 789-4370, www.strokeassociation.org

Resources to Physicians, hospitals, healthcare

professionals, and individuals, CPR classes

 

Arthritis Foundation Nevada

1368 Paseo Verde Pkwy, S-200B

Henderson, NV 89012. 702-367-1626

www.arthritis.org. Telephone Reassurance,                         Referral Service, Literature, Exercise Classes,         Aquatics, self-help programs

 

Cancer Connection

Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada

3730 S. Eastern Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89109

(702) 952-3400 Call for Info and Locations

 

Divorced & Widowed Adjustment, Inc.

P.O. Box 26504, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 735-5544, www.info4nv.org

Counseling Service

 

Epilepsy Support Group

Sunrise Hospital Auditorium

3186 S. Maryland Pkwy., LV, NV 89109

702-731-8115. 2nd Wed. of the month, 5:30pm.                     Meet other people with seizures

 

For the Cure, So. NV Affiliate

4850 W. Flamingo Rd., #25, LV, NV 89103

702-822-2324, www.komensouthernnevada.org

Education, Resources, Friendly Visitation,

Telephone Reassurance

Grief & Loss Support Groups

702-796-3157, www.NAH.org. Call for additional info

 

Hemophilia Foundation of Nevada

7473 W. Lake Mead Blvd., Ste 100, LV, NV 89128

(702) 564-4368, www.HFNV.org

Telephone Reassurance, Advocacy,

Education on bleeding disorders

Las Vegas Valley Lewy Body Dementia

Caregiver Support Group

Call (702) 789-8371 – Joan

Caregiver, Support group meets at Pacifica                          Green Valley: 2620 Robindale Rd., Henderson,                        last Monday of month – 2pm.

 

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

6280 S. Valley View Blvd.,#342, LV, NV 89118

(702) 436-4220, www.lls.org/snv

Information Resource Center, Education,                             Referral, Financial Aid, Support Groups

 

Muscular Dystrophy Assn.

6320 W. Cheyenne #150, Las Vegas, NV 89108

(702) 822-6920, www.mgausa.org

Counseling, Telephone Reassurance, Medical                      Care, Referral, Medical equipment available,                           must be registered with Muscular Dystrophy

 

National Kidney Foundation

15490 Ventura Blvd., Suite 210

Sherman Oaks, CA 91403, 1 (800) 747-5527

Patient Helpline 1-855-653-2273

www.kidney.org. Info, Referrals.

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

2110 E. Flamingo, Ste., 203, LV, NV 89119

(702) 736-1478, www.nationalmssociety.org                         9am-5pm. Provide information, education,                   support services for families & persons with MS

Nevada Council on Problem Gambling

5552 S. Fort Apache Rd., Ste 100, LV, NV 89148

(702) 369-9740, www.nevadacouncil.org

Telephone Reassurance, Referral,

Problem Gambling Helpline:1-800-522-4700

 

Nevada Tobacco Users

Real help for smokers who want to stop.

Call 1-800-784-8669 (QUIT NOW)

 

No to Abuse – NV Outreach

621 S. Blagg Rd., Pahrump, NV 89048

Crisis line: 1-775-751-1118

Education, Food, Referral, 24/7 Crisis Line,                         Shelter, Counseling, Advocacy, Support                   Groups, intervention & prevention groups,                                parenting groups, shelter for domestic

violence, legal services

 

Ostomy Las Vegas – St. Rose Siena Hospital

Eastern and St. Rose Pkwy., Henderson, NV

Group meets from Sept. to June, 2nd Sat of                          Month, 2pm-4pm, 2nd Tues – Sept. – June, 7:30pm

www.ostomylasvegas.weebly.com

(702) 483-8116 for Info, snvostomy@gmail.com

 

Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Nevada

(702) 796-0430, www.ocan.org

Call for phone support from other women

 

Prostate Support Group, “Us Too”

702-917-7779, www.prostatetaskforce.nv.org

3rd Wed. of the month @7pm, St. Rose

Dominican Hospital, San Martin campus

8280 W. Warm Springs Rd. LV, NV

 

So. NV Association of Polio Survivors –

Las Vegas, Henderson, Pahrump & Boulder City

(702) 644-5091 – Diane. Call for locations.

Support Group for polio survivors , monthly

meetings every 3rd Saturday at 1pm, sharing

knowledge, information, social activities

Sunrise Hospital Breast Cancer Support

The Breast Cancer Center at Sunrise

3006 S. Maryland Pkwy., Ste. 250 LV, NV 89109

Oncology Nutrition Program: 6-7:30pm,

3rd Wed of the Month, need to RSVP

(702) 784-7870. Taichi: Thursdays

11am – 12pm, $5. Call for other programs.

 

Sunrise Hospital Stroke Support Group

Sunrise Hospital – Auditorium

3006 S. Maryland Pkwy., Las Vegas, NV 89109

Meet other people that have suffered a stroke.

3rd Wednesday of the month at 6pm. Free                              and open to the public. Registration not                    required. Learn valuable, educational info about                      strokes. This class is for adults only and you are
welcome to bring a friend or loved one.

Call 702-784-7983 for more info.

 

The Barbara Greenspun Women’s

Care Center of St. Rose

2651 Paseo Verde Pkwy, Ste. 180

Henderson, NV 89074, (702) 616-4902

Senior peer counseling for seniors 50+,
issues such as loss, bereavement, health                                problems, relationships and retirement

 

The Center – Wize Womyn

401 S. Maryland Pkwy. LV, NV 89101

702-733-9800, www.thecenterlv.org

Social and support group for LGBTQ Senior

drop ins. M-F 10:30am-2pm

 

The Center (Gay Men’s Forum)

401 S. Maryland Pkwy., LV, NV 89101

702-733-9800, www.thecenterlv.org

Social and support group for gay and bisexual                    men of all ages, each Wed. at 6pm.

 

Veterans National Caregivers Support Line

1-855-260-3274 VA Clinic Info 8am-8pm EST.

caregiver.va.gov

Nevada-Senior-Guide Multiple Services Directory – Southern Nevada

AARP – Nevada State Office / Contact Center

5820 S. Eastern Ave. #190, LV, NV 89119

Toll Free 1-866-389-5652

www.aarp.org/nv

Advocacy, Employment Assistance, Safe

Driving Instruction, Tax Services, Legal Services

Catholic Charities of So. Nevada

531 N. 30th St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 382-0721

Foster Grandparent Program, Senior                                     Companion Program, Retired Senior Volunteers.                    Mon-Fri 7:30am-4pm. Telephone reassurance,                     Legal services

City Mission of Las Vegas

2214 N. Pecos Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89115

(702) 384-1930. Referral Service, Counseling                     Services, Donations; Geriatric, Friendly
Visitation, Food Boxes, clothing, Breakfast
8:30-9:30, Need application on file.

 

Clark County – Public Guardian

515 Shadow Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 455-4332, www.accessclarkcounty.com

Guardianship, Provide financial management

Clark County Social Services

1600 Pinto Lane, LV, NV 89106

(702) 455-7051, www.clarkcounty.com

Referral Service, Alternative Healthcare,

Long-Term Care, Homemaker Program,                   Financial Help, U.S. Citizens and Legal

Residents, Short Term Info, 7am-4:30pm

 

Friends in the Desert, Inc.

43 West Pacific Avenue, Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 565-8742

Meals served 6 days a week, Call for times,                          Clothing needed, Legal Assistance

 

Grace Care Center

2020 W. Bonanza Rd., LV, NV 89106

702-749-6332

Wellness, Mentoring Center, Basic Skills,                           Psycho-Social Rehab. Call for additional info

 

Hope Link of Southern Nevada

178 Westminster Way, Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 566-0576. Rental/Utilities assistance,                         Food Pantry, Henderson Residents, Mon –                  Thur, 8am – 6pm, Closed 12pm – 1pm for                             Lunch, closed Friday. Need proof of income                              and residency, NV ID, SS Card

 

Help of Southern Nevada

1640 E. Flamingo Rd., LV, NV 89119

(702) 369-4357, www.helpsonv.org

Travelers Assistance, Home Repairs, Shelter,

Food, Clothing, Family Resources, Lifeline,

Respite Services, Bus tokens, weatherization.

Renters utility services, HOPWA Program,

7am-5pm, Work Center, Homeless Services.                           Closed Fri.

Helping Hands of Henderson

102 E. Lake Mead Pkwy., Henderson, NV 89015

(702) 616-6554

Community Research, Referrals, Transportation,

60+ Older Henderson Residents, 8am-4:30pm

Helping Hands of NLV

3640 North 5th St., Suite 130, N. LV, NV 89032

(702) 649-7853. Referral, Paper Goods/Pantry
Distribution, Transportation to Doctor, Repair
– small jobs – inside only & miscellaneous.

Helping Hands of Vegas Valley

2320 Paseo Del Prado Bldg. B #204, LV, NV 89102

(702) 633-7264, www.hhovv.org

Referral Service, Respite Care, Volunteer

Transportation, The Pantry, Wheelchair van                        available. 60+ Over

Jewish Family Service Agency

4794 S. Eastern Ave., Ste. C, LV, NV 89119

(702) 732-0304, www.jfsalv.org. Call for hours.

Counseling, Holocaust Survivor Assistance,                       Adoption, Career Development, Pantry.

Las Vegas Rescue Mission

480 West Bonanza Road, Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 382-1766, www.vegasrescue.org

8am-6:30pm, Phone assistance for info

Shelter, Referral, Counseling, Nutrition, Eye                    Glasses, Thrift Store

 

Las Vegas Senior Citizens Ctr.

451 East Bonanza Road, Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 229-6454. Tripsters, Socialization,
monthly luncheons,  arts & crafts, exercise,
computers, music,  singing, billiards.

 

Lend A Hand, Inc.

400 Utah St., Boulder City, NV 89005

(702) 294-2363. Transportation, Referral,                           Friendly Visitation, Respite Care (3 hrs), Health         equipment M – F 9:00am – 2:00pm, In-Home                                Services, Lend a Hand Program

 

Lutheran Social Services of NV

73 Spectrum Blvd., LV, NV 89101

(702) 639-1730, www.lssnv.org

Food Pantry (over 62), Housing/Rental

Assistance, Utility assistance, Help getting                          State ID & Birth Certificates, Call for Info.                7:30am-4pm. Special programs.

Nevada Senior Services

901 N. Jones Blvd., LV, NV 89108, 702-648-3425

Creative aging, caregiver support groups,                             outreach programs, home modification. Call                             for additional assistance. Senior Assessment

 

Nevada SMP Senior Medicare Patrol

1860 E. Sahara Ave., LV, NV 89104

702-486-3403 or 1-888-838-7305

Prevention of fraud & medicare abuse, File claims

 

Nevada State Contractors Board

2310 Corporate Cir., Ste 200

Henderson, NV 89074

(702) 486-1100, www.nscb.nv.gov

Regulatory agency promoting quality

construction by Nevada licensed contractors.                   Provides contractor license verifications,

assistance with contractor workmanship

issues and homeowner education

regarding unlicensed contractors.

 

Nevada Talking Book Services (Library)

100 N. Stewart St., Carson City, NV 89701

1-800-922-9334, www.nevadaculture.org

Provide books, magazines, auto books

for blind and physically handicapped

Nevada Talking Book Services

6655 W. Sahara Ave., Ste B200, LV, NV 89146

(702) 486-3737, www.nevadaculture.org

Outreach and public awareness

 

RAGE Program – Aging & Disability

Resource Center           (702) 333-1038

2901 El Camino Ave., S-102, LV, NV 89102

Referral Service, Home Modification:

Minor, Build Handicap Ramps, Durable

Medical, Home & Vehicle Modification,                   Prescription Assistance

 

 

Senior Life Line/Goldberg Senior Center

2309 Renaissance Dr. #B, LV, NV 89119

(702) 933-1191. Transportation for Groceries
+ DRs, Homemaker Service, Nutritional
Program, Kosher Meals On Wheels, Home                             Safety Program, Limited Space, Henderson                    Transportation, Lunch on Fridays, Taxi
Vouchers

So. NV Center for Independent Living

4100 N. Martin Luther King, Ste. E100,

N. Las Vegas, NV 89030. www.sncil.org

(702) 649-3822, (800) 398-0760 toll free

People with disabilities, Counseling, Housing

Assistance, Advocacy, Technical Assistance,                        Public Awareness, Education, Referral info for                     food and transportation

 

State of NV Aging & Disability Services Division

Community Home-Based Initiatives Programs

1860 E. Sahara Ave., LV, NV 89104, 702-486-3545

Referral Service, Homemaker Program, Meal                      Delivery, Advocacy, Community Ombudsman,
Medicare counseling, taxi coupons, RX
Assistance, Elder Abuse and Neglect, Grant                        Programs, CHIP, Complaints.

 

Sun City Summerlin Charities, Inc.

10362 Sun City Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89134

(702) 254-5831. Hours: 8:30am-11am

Residents Only. Transportation, Small

handyman jobs

 

The Salvation Army-Family Services

1581 N. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101

(702) 649-8240. Food Assistance, Case
Management, Referral,  gas & electric out
reach program, Age 62 (need to call for
qualification)

 

The Salvation Army

2900 Palomino Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89107

(702) 870-4430. Administrative Offices, Church

Donations welcome.

Veterans So. NV, Health Care System

N. Las Vegas, NV 89036

(702) 791-9000 for clinic connections

1-800-273-8255 Suicide, Opt 1 Lifeline

Pharmaceutical & Medical Assistance,

Psychiatric, Counseling, Support Groups,                            Respite Care, Assisted Care, Transportation                            to and from various clinics, VA benefits and                          services, Flu shots, Care Giver Program

Women’s Dev. Ctr. for Independent Living

4020 Pecos-McLeod, Las Vegas, NV 89104

(702) 796-7770. Affordable Rental Program,                      Clothing donations welcome. Call for Food                             Bank Info

Nevada-Senior-Guide Financial Assistance Directory – Southern Nevada

Auto Insurance Discounts

AARP Driver Safety Class

Qualify for 3 yrs. Auto insurance discounts per NV Law

AARP Members $15; non-members $20

1-877-846-3299

www.aarp.org/drive

 

American Red Cross

1771 E. Flamingo Rd. #206B, LV, NV 89119

(702) 791-3311, www.redcrosslasvegas.org

Financial, Assistance to victims of disaster,

Military Services, Retired Military, CPR & First Aid                         classes, Donations and Volunteers welcome.

 

Clark County Advocate Program

1600 Pinto Lane, LV, NV 89106, (702) 455-7051

Limited financial assistance. Call for info.

 

Clark County Assessor

Main Office: 500 S. Grand Central Parkway

Las Vegas, NV 89106, Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm

3211 N. Tenaya Way #118

Las Vegas, NV 89129 (closed Fridays)

(702) 455-3891 Main Number

(702) 455-3882 Customer Service

www.accessclarkcounty.com/assessor

Qualified exemptions, walk-in customers

only-payments, information

Century Link

Call for various locations. (702) 244-7400

No Federal Line Charge, Lifeline Services

 

Comfort Savings Program – NV Energy

(702) 402-5555 Customer Service

www.nvenergy.com. Free home energy
efficiency audits & upgrades for income
qualified customers. Empower Program.

Cool SHARE & SXACT Comfort Programs.

Emergency Aid For Boulder City

600 Nevada Way, Boulder City, NV 89005

(702) 293-0332. Financial, Food Pantry &                              Housing Assistance Mon-Fri. 9am-noon.                       Boudler city residents.

 

Financial Guidance Center

2650 S. Jones Blvd., LV, NV 89146

702-364-0344

Utility Assistance, 1st time home buyers,                               credit counseling.

 

Henderson-NV State Welfare

520 South Boulder Hwy., Henderson, NV 89015

1-800-992-0900 or 702-486-1001

1-775-684-0350 N. Nevada – Unemployment

1-888-890-8211 Other Locations

Food Stamps, Medicaid, Seniors Over 65,

Emergency Assistance, State Operators

Nevada State Welfare & Supportive Services

3330 E. Flamingo Rd., Ste. 55. LV, NV 89121

(702) 486-9400 OR 1-800-992-0900

Food Stamps, Medicaid, Seniors over 65,

Domestic Violence, Rehab.

(702) 836-3175, SNAP Program,

ENERGY Assistance

 

Social Security Administration

4340 Simmons St., N. LV, NV 89032

1-800-772-1213 or 1-866-614-9667 Local

www.ssa.gov, www.socialsecurity.gov

Financial Assistance, Interpreter Service:                            Spanish, Call for Benefits and Hours

www.healthreform.gov

 

Social Security Administration

10416 S. Eastern Ave., Henderson, NV 89052

1-800-772-1213 or 1-855-207-7084 Local

www.socialsecurity.gov. Call for benefits & hours

 

Social Security Administration – Card Center

1250 S. Buffalo Drive, S-150, LV, NV 89117

1-800-772-1213, 1-866-704-4859 Local

www.socialsecurity.gov

Call for Benefits and Hours

Southern NV Ctr. for Independent Living

2950 S. Rainbow, #220, LV, NV 89146

(702) 889-4216, www.sncil.org

4100 N. Martin Luther King, Ste. E100

N. LV, NV 89032, 702-649-3822

Benefits Counseling, Housing Referral,

Transportation for disabled

State of Nevada Welfare Division

702-486-5000

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Pgm.

Energy Assistance Program,

Fixed & Low Income, Medicade

Nevada-Senior-Guide KNPR 88-9 Radio – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Leisure 

http://www.knpr.org/

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Nevada Public Radio KNPR

Radio Reading Service
Nevada Public Radio
 Do you know someone who has a problem reading?Let Nevada Public Radio Help.The Radio Reading Service offers free reading broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week for people who are visually and print impaired.Statewide newspapers including the Review-Journal, Las Vegas Sun and Reno Gazette-Journal
National publications including Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal
Best-selling and critically-acclaimed booksSpecial radio receivers are provided free of charge for the broadcasts.

For an application, call Jay Bartos at
702-258-9895

KNEWS 970am

970 AMKNUU Las Vegas

Business & Financial Talk

Your money

Your life

Your radio station

News, Traffic & Weather throughout the day

Community shows on finance and lifestyle

Plus Paul Harvey, Ray Lucia

Bruce Williams, Lou Dobbs,

Wall Street Journal Reports

Donald Trump & Andy Vierra

Streaming on the web 24/7

970KNUU.com

Frequently Asked Questions About Nevada Public Radio
  • Privacy Policy
  • Mailing List Policy
  • Membership Information
  • Prize Giveaway Guidelines
  • Annual Report
  • Contact
  • Programs
  • Features
  • Radio Reading Service
  • Sponsors
  • Transmitters
  • Jobs
  • Auto Donation
  • E News
  • HD Radio
“Nevada Public Radio will be recognized as the leading independent source of information and cultural expression, and a catalyst for civic engagement.”

Our history…

Nurtured in its formative years by the Clark County Library District, Nevada Public Radio was incorporated in December, 1975 as an independent, Nevada non-profit corporation. Its flagship station, KNPR signed on the air March 24, 1980 as Nevada’s first National Public Radio (NPR) affiliated station.

Nevada Public Radio operates a non-commercial, radio broadcast network comprised of seven stations, KNPR Las Vegas (88.9), KCNV Las Vegas (89.7), KTPH Tonopah (91.7), KLNR Panaca (91.7), KWPR Lund/Ely (88.7), KSGU St. George (90.3), KLKR Elko (89.3), plus five rural translators. It is overseen by a volunteer Board of Directors including founder and Director Emeritus, Lamar Marchese.

The staff includes full-time staff of 30, plus part time and contract employees, and dozens of administrative and fundraising volunteers. More than 9,000 members and 50 corporations and foundations support the stations.

KNPR broadcasts with 100,000 watts (ERP), at 88.9 FM. It programs a 24 hour service of National Public Radio (NPR) news and information, with specialty shows like A Prairie Home Companion and Car Talk. (See our program schedule.)

Nevada Public Radio produces 10 hours a week of original content. KNPR’s State of Nevada is a national award-winning public affairs program supported by a dynamic web site.  Launched with a $500,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, KNPR’s SoN has been honored locally and nationally for program excellence including the ACE Award from the Public Radio Program Directors Association.

Independent research shows the combined Nevada Public Radio weekly audience is more than 200,000 listeners, our website attracts approximately 240,000 visitor sessions each month and more than 200,000 audio downloads of original content.

To serve residents of Nevada and adjacent states, Nevada Public Radio operates a series of transmitters extending service to more than 150,000 residents within its 49,000 square miles coverage area, including Tonopah, Panaca, Ely, Mesquite, Laughlin and Scotty’s Junction, NV, plus Death Valley and Ridgecrest, CA, Lake Havasu City, AZ and St. George, UT.

In 1993, responding to another unmet need, Nevada Public Radio established the state’s first and only Radio Reading Service. This closed-circuit, 24 hour reading service delivers timely, original information totally free of charge to blind and visually-impaired listeners throughout the coverage area. With the cooperation of KUNR-Reno and KNCC-Elko, the service is available to 98% of the Nevada population.  It is also available online.

After many years of effort in 2003, Nevada Public Radio signed on a new full-service station in Las Vegas, Classical 89.7, which provides 24-hours a day classical music.

Our newest, full-service station is in Elko, NV – News 89.3 KLKR, which provides 24-hours a day news and information.

Nevada Public Radio operates on an annual budget of $4.7-million. See our latest Annual Audited Financial Statement  and our latest Form 990.

This on-line Annual Report informs members, underwriters, grantors and other community shareholders about the financial health of Nevada Public Radio, including investments, station goals and objectives.  The member recognition includes profiles of some the supporters of Nevada Public Radio.

In 1996, Nevada Public Radio was one of seven applicants, out of 1,300 candidates, to receive a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. NVPR received $4.5 million dollars to construct and equip a new permanent home for KNPR.

Endowment

In accepting the Reynolds award, the Board of Directors committed itself to raising a minimum of $1.5 million in endowment funding. That commitment has increased to $2.2 million. The endowment campaign received a lead gift from the L. J. Castle family, along with early contributions from the Boyd Foundation, the Nevada Arts Council, the Lincy Foundation, Frances Saxton, Jim Rogers, J. A. Tiberti, John Klai, the Laub family (Bill Sr., Mary and Bill Jr.), Louis Castle and Westwood Studios, The National Endowment for the Humanities, the Union Pacific Foundation, as well as individual contributions from the listeners, staff and Board of Directors of Nevada Public Radio.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

http://www.nvaging.net/

The Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) in the State of Nevada, Department of Health and Human Services, represents Nevadans aged 60 years and older and those with disabilities.

Mission Statement The Aging and Disability Services Division provides leadership and advocacy in the planning, development and delivery of a high quality, comprehensive support service system across the lifespan. This allows all of Nevada’s elders, adults and children with disabilities or special health care needs to live independent, meaningful, and dignified lives in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs. Developmental Services

State of Nevada Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD)

Programs/Services

 

Advocate for Elders

Advocacy, assistance, information and referral to frail seniors, who are 60 years of age or older, primarily homebound and living in the community, and their caregivers.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)

Provides citizen-centered “one-stop” entry points into the long-term support system. Serves individuals in need of long-term support, caregivers, and those planning for future long-term support needs.

Assisted Living (AL) Waiver

Assisted living supportive services to eligible individuals in a residential facility as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Community Options Program for the Elderly (COPE)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement. Similar to the HCBW Program.

 

Disability Rx (External link) Assistance with the cost of prescription medicines to qualified individuals with disabilities.

 

Disability Services (External link)The Office of Disability Services provides resources at the community level which promote equal opportunity and life choices for people with disabilities through which they may positively contribute to Nevada.

Elder Protective Services (EPS)

For persons 60 years old and older who may experience abuse, neglect, exploitation, or isolation.

 

Grants

Information for current and/or prospective grantees.

 

Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW formerly CHIP)

Non-medical services to older persons to help them maintain independence in their own homes as an alternative to nursing home placement.

 

Homemaker Program

General housekeeping, limited meal preparation, shopping, laundering, errands, standby assistance with bathing, and home management services.

 

IDEA Part C Office

Provides oversight of Part C (early intervention services) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Addresses issues and problems faced by residents in long term care facilities, which includes residential facilities for groups.

 

Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)

The goal of the SMP program is to empower seniors to prevent Medicare/health care fraud through outreach and education.

 

Senior Rx

Nevada’s plan to provide Nevada seniors relief from the high cost of prescription medicine.

 

Senior Tax Assistance/Rent Rebate Program

This program is no longer available.

 

State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP)

Medicare Counseling Information

Counseling and assistance to Medicare Beneficiaries in Nevada, utilizing a statewide network of volunteers.

 

Taxi Assistance Program (TAP)

Discounted taxicab fares to seniors and persons with disabilities in Clark County. (Washoe County also has a program of this type.

 

 

Waiver for the Elderly in Adult Residential Care (WEARC)

Non-medical services in a group care setting to offer individuals a less expensive alternative of supervised care in a residential setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada-Senior-Guide Helping Hands of Vegas Valley – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.hhovv.org

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SERVING SENIORS in SOUTHERN NEVADA

No Cost Services Assist Seniors to Remain Independent

  Established in 2000, Helping Hands of Vegas Valley is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with the mission to provide free, assistive services to senior citizens in Southern Nevada, allowing them to maintain their dignity and independence while improving health and daily living.

Our services include:

  • Transportation
  • Food Pantry
  • Respite Care Vouchers

Volunteer at your convenience!

SERVICES

We are a community agency providing the following free services to seniors 60 and over in the Las Vegas Valley.

Transportation

Transportation

HHOVV has two Para transit buses that can accommodate wheelchair clients. Rides are provided for medical appointments, grocery store shopping and other errands.

HHOVV volunteer drivers provide transportation to and from medical appointments, shopping trips and errands. All volunteers receive orientation training and a background check.

New clients meet with HHOVV’s intake coordinator for an assessment and must be 60 years of age or older, show proof of Nevada residency and display a need for assistance. Individuals needing services are typically alone and frail, chronically ill, homebound, and/or dependent on a primary caregiver. Reassessments are completed on an annual basis. HHOVV does not charge for these services. Volunteers and staff do not accept tips, gifts, fees, loans or anything of value from clients.

To be added to the waiting list for transportation services please contact Myrna or Nichole at 702-633-7264 x29.

Respite Care Vouchers

Respite Care Vouchers

The HHOVV respite voucher program is funded by the state Aging and Disabled Services Division and provides temporary relief for caregivers. Individuals who do not take time off while caring for a loved one may compromise their physical and mental well-being. Utilizing respite services is one way to reduce stress, allowing individuals to be more effective caregivers. Also, using respite services may delay early institutionalization

Food Pantry

Food Pantry

HHOVV also keeps a food pantry stocked with non-perishable items and delivers a free bag once a month to clients who meet eligibility requirements. Clients must be 60 years of age or older, show proof of Nevada residency and proof that their annual income is at or below 150% of current poverty guidelines. To become a pantry recipient a senior may call 702-633-7264 x22 and leave their name and phone number.

The organization accepts donations of non-perishable food items at a warehouse office in North Las Vegas. Donations are always appreciated!

If you are interested in holding a food drive for HHOVV please contact Lorri Highet at 702-633-7264 x30.

An organization serving the Seniors of Las Vegas.

2320 Paseo Del Prado #B112

Las Vegas, NV 89102

702-633-7264

E-mail: hhofvv@aol.com

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!