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U.S. Veterans Honored by Encore.org’s 2013 Purpose Prize

November 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Seven Awards for People Over Age 60 Solving the World’s Toughest Social Problems

The Purpose Prize has become a “MacArthur genius award for people who develop a second career as social service entrepreneurs.” – The New York Times.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy organizes a network of volunteers across the country to teach disabled veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan how to combat stress — through fly-fishing.

A public relations executive helps wounded warriors find and renovate foreclosed homes – and transforms lives and neighborhoods in the process.

These are two of the seven winners of the 2013 Purpose Prize, awarded by Encore.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who translate decades of skill and experience into “second acts” that contribute to society’s greater good.

Now in its eighth year, The Purpose Prize is the nation’s only large-scale investment in people over 60 who are combining their passion and experience for the social good. Created in 2005 by Encore.org, the prize is aimed at those with the passion to make change and the wisdom to know how to do it, showcasing the value of experience and disproving the notion that innovation is solely the province of the young.

Two winners will receive $100,000 each and five winners will receive $25,000 each.

This year’s winners:

* Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. ($100,000 winner of The Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra)

* Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron taps into her own experience as a cancer survivor to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. ($100,000)

* Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing emotional wounds through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. ($25,000)

* Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
Fennelly runs a unique summer camp behind bars that is transforming federal prisoners into involved parents. ($25,000)

* Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
Huttinger’s project is on a path to eradicate human schistosomiasis, a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. ($25,000)

* Reverend Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. ($25,000)

* Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
Young’s rise from immigrant nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. ($25,000)

The Purpose Prize winners will be honored on December 5, 2013, at an awards ceremony in Sausalito, Ca. NBC’s Jane Pauley will emcee the event for hundreds of Encore leaders and the Purpose Prize winners.

Twenty-one judges – leaders in business, politics, journalism and the nonprofit sector – chose the seven winners from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees. Judges include Sherry Lansing, former CEO of Paramount; David Bornstein, author and New York Times columnist; Eric Liu, writer and founder of CitizenUniversity; and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, The Purpose Prize is a program of Encore.org, which aims to engage millions of boomers in encore careers combining personal meaning, continued income and social impact in the second half of life.

This year, Symetra is sponsoring the $100,000 Purpose Prize for Future Promise, which recognizes an individual whose approach for helping society has the potential to grow steadily over the next five years. The company plans to sponsor another Purpose Prize for Future Promise in 2014.

“While Purpose Prize winners are helping to solve a wide range of pressing social problems, they have one thing in common,” said Marc Freedman, CEO and founder of Encore.org and author of The Big Shift (PublicAffairs Books). “They – and millions of others in encore careers – are turning personal passions and decades of experience into invaluable contributions across sectors, continents and generations, often through entrepreneurship.”

Short summaries for all winners follow. Photos are attached. Longer bios and higher resolution photos are available.

Vicki Thomas, Purple Heart Homes, Weston, Ct.
Thomas, winner of this year’s Purpose Prize for Future Promise, sponsored by Symetra, rallies communities around wounded soldiers, providing them with adapted foreclosed homes that improve quality of life for veterans and whole communities alike. Following a 35-year-career as a fundraising and marketing dynamo, she became the director of communications at Purple Heart Homes in 2008 in an effort to provide greater services for veterans who have service-connected disabilities. In just three years, Thomas helped take the fledgling nonprofit to new heights. She has raised millions for Purple Heart Homes in financial contributions and material donations. Revenue shot up 600% in her first year with the startup. She’s developed an innovative program that matches veterans with foreclosed homes donated by banks, then raises the funds to renovate a home for the individual veteran’s needs. It’s a win-win for all generations—and communities too. It helps veterans to grow assets, towns to recoup lost taxes and neighborhoods that have struggled with foreclosures to stabilize.

Ysabel Duron, Latinas Contra Cancer, San Jose, Ca.
Duron is an award-winning journalist with more than 42 years in television broadcasting. She tapped into her own experience as a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma to shine a spotlight on cancer for Latino communities across the United States. To focus on the plight of low-income Latinos fighting the disease, Duron founded Latinas Contra Cancer (Latinas Against Cancer), an organization committed to educating, supporting and providing essential services to low-income Spanish speakers often overlooked by the health care system. Latinas Contra Cancer has offered a range of programs that have taught more than 3,000 men, women and teens about the disease, resulting in more than 300 preventative cancer screenings. The group has provided psychological and social support to over 100 patients per year. However, the call to action Duron answered has had an impact far beyond the Bay Area. Her passionate commitment is helping Latino communities across the U.S. gain access to cancer support, information and treatment. Her great empathy for cancer patients has made her utterly clear on her bigger purpose in the second stage of life.

Edwin P. Nicholson, Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc., Port Tobacco, Md.
Nicholson mentors disabled veterans, healing the emotional wounds of battle through the power of relationships and the great outdoors. A cancer survivor and war veteran himself, Nicholson was impressed by the fortitude of disabled veterans at the Walter Reed military hospital, where he was treated for prostate cancer in 2005. It spurred him to found Project Healing Waters, a program dedicated to helping disabled soldiers and veterans recover from the trying aftermath of war through the sport of fly-fishing. One-on-one connections have been key to Project Healing Waters’ approach since the beginning. Nicholson knew there were fly-fishing groups and facilities all over the country. His innovation was to convince them to start, manage and lead fly-fishing instruction and outings with veterans through military and Veterans Administration facilities. The quiet bonds forged over fishing lines began to transform lives. Again and again Nicholson heard from family members who said their loved ones had returned from war withdrawn, angry, and difficult to be around. But after fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters, they’ve become happier, more open and engaged. Project Healing Waters works closely with VA Recreational and Occupational therapies to identify those who would most benefit from the program. Many are in wheelchairs or using prosthetics. A few are blind. Participants reflect of full spectrum of disabled veterans and include all ages, genders, ethnicities and disabilities. Nicholson says the impact “goes well beyond the mechanics of fly-fishing.”

Carol Fennelly, Hope House, Washington, D.C.
A lifelong social activist who ran homeless shelters in the District of Columbia for 17 years, Carol Fennelly abandoned her plans to retire in 1998 when she learned that D.C. inmates had been transferred to Youngstown, OH. One woman made 10-hour round-trip drives twice a week to visit her son. Moved to answer a social need, Fennelly thought about opening a hospitality house in Youngstown for family members visiting inmates. She soon learned that while 93% of the federal inmate population is male, in sheer numbers there are more programs for mothers in prison than there are for fathers. She decided she had what it took to change things. “I had spent years organizing, dealing with government, making change happen, and that emboldened me to think I could go into prisons and start all these radical programs,” Fennelly says. So she launched an encore career with Hope House, an innovative organization that helps prison inmates stay in regular contact with their children. In the past 14 years, Hope House has hosted 200 video teleconferences, 18,000 personalized book readings by fathers and 31 week-long summer camps, which allow kids to spend time with their fathers free of the usual restrictions that come with visitor hours and family chaperones. California recently decided to implement the Hope House model in its 33 state prisons. Prisons in Texas, Idaho and New Hampshire may follow. In 2013 Fennelly was honored at the White House as a Champion of Change.

Elizabeth Huttinger, Projet Crevette, Pasadena, Ca.
International public health expert Elizabeth Huttinger spotted a big idea in shrimp, and launched an encore career that could eradicate a disease infecting millions of the world’s poorest. Huttinger’s project – founded in 2006 – is targeting human schistosomiasis, an infectious parasite carried by river snails. Understanding that the population of prawns that eat those snails had precipitously declined, Huttinger, 63, has devoted her encore career to restoring the prawn population in the SenegalRiver Basin. Projet Crevette’s mission is multifaceted: the restoration of the prawn population diminishes the spread of schisto, provides new economic opportunities to afflicted communities and heals families infected by the disease. Today, Projet Crevette is a prawn-farming microenterprise, operated by locals at public watering holes. It has brought social innovation, new microbusinesses, environmental restoration and improved health to communities. Huttinger is confident Projet Crevette will meet its bold goal to fully restore the indigenous prawn population—and improve countless lives in the process.

Violet Little, The WelcomeChurch, Philadelphia, Pa.
Reverend Violet Little is redefining the concept of “church” as she pastors Philadelphia’s homeless in a church without walls. After 14 years as parish pastor trained in psychotherapy, Little left behind her traditional congregation to create a religious refuge for the homeless on the streets of the city, which became the “WelcomeChurch.” The church relies mostly on word of mouth, and services can pop up in a city park or on a sidewalk. No questions are asked, and everyone is welcome. The WelcomeChurch coordinates medical services through local universities, helps people get into rehab or jobs, and offers educational services to the public on the causes of homelessness. Little estimates 40 percent of her congregants have moved off the streets into permanent housing and the WelcomeChurch celebrates each and every one of them, many of whom stay connected with Little through their transition. Little’s congregation has grown to include hundreds of homeless as well as non-homeless volunteers in the EvangelicalLutheranChurch in America.

Barbara Young, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York, NY
An immigrant from the West Indies who built a meaningful life on meager income, Young’s gritty rise from nanny to passionate advocate gives her a powerful voice in the fight for domestic workers’ rights across the United States. She’s encouraged thousands to stand up for their right to earn a living wage, and counsels and trains others to become leaders themselves. In 2004, Young began building a movement to legislate a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in New YorkState, which would make overtime, paid time off and rest days mandatory. In 2009, when she heard then Governor David Patterson say on the radio that he’d sign the bill if it made it to his desk, she put on a full court press, becoming the engine behind passage of the law in 2010. The law is the first of its kind in the country, but Young is committed to making sure it isn’t the last. She’s now a key player in the NDWA’s expansion from 11 to 44 affiliated organizations with 15,000 members, up from 5,000 in 2007. Young’s passion for serving her community has only just begun.

Read More About Encore’s Purpose Prize at www.encore.org/prize.

About Encore.org

Encore.org is a national nonprofit that promotes the idea that people in their second acts have the talent and experience to solve some of society’s greatest problems.

About The Atlantic Philanthropies

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. In keeping with the Giving While Living philosophy of founder Charles “Chuck” Feeney, The Atlantic Philanthropies believes in making large investments to capitalize on significant opportunities to solve urgent problems now, so they are less likely to become larger, more entrenched and more expensive challenges later. The Atlantic Philanthropies also seeks to encourage others of significant wealth to engage in major philanthropic pursuits in their lifetime.

About The John Templeton Foundation

The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality, supporting research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.

About Symetra

Symetra Financial Corporation (NYSE: SYA) is a diversified financial services company based in Bellevue, Wash. In business since 1957, Symetra provides employee benefits, annuities and life insurance through a national network of benefit consultants, financial institutions, and independent agents and advisors.

 

CONTACT: Sara Ying Rounsaville, srounsaville@encore.org, 415-952-5121, or Russ Mitchell, rmitchell@encore.org, 510-969-0801

Staying Safe on the Road: Senior Driving Guide

November 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Learn the challenges that may keep older adults off the road and find tips for staying safe behind the wheel

According to a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drivers in their mid- to late-80s have lower overall crash rates than drivers in their early 20s and roughly half as many crashes as teenagers—making them among the safest drivers on the road.

However, fatal crash rates skyrocket for drivers ages 85 and older. In “The Guide to Driving Safety for Older Drivers” from MySilverAge.com, Jake Nelson, AAA director of traffic safety advocacy and research in Washington, D.C., says it’s important to understand what health factors can compromise safe driving. If senior drivers have ongoing limitations that could put them or their passengers at risk, they may want to reconsider their capacity to continue driving.

Older drivers should evaluate how the following factors affect their driving ability:

  • Vision. How well a driver can see accounts for about 90 percent of his or her ability to drive safely. Weak visual aptitude can be measured by an inability to read signs, street markings, or to see other cars and pedestrians in low-light conditions.
  • Mobility. Loss of strength, coordination and flexibility can make it challenging to control a vehicle. Mobility difficulties may also be signaled by pain and discomfort performing daily activities as well as arthritis in the neck and shoulders.
  • Behavior. Trouble remembering familiar routes, anxiety or confusion while driving, or problems distinguishing the gas from the brake pedal are causes for immediate concern.

For a complete list of driving safety tips, including information on driver improvement courses, new driving technologies and alternate modes of transportation, download the driving guide for seniors.

About MySilverAge
MySilverAge is a website and online resource center, brought to you by be.group, that is designed to help seniors enjoy “what’s next.” MySilverAge brings together thought leaders on the subject of successful aging, leading intelligence on healthy aging and senior living, and expert tips and advice for creating the home, community and relationships in which seniors can thrive.

About be.group
As one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities, be.group is committed to creating communities and services that make the lives of older adults more fulfilling. be.group’s dedicated, well-trained staff is devoted to helping its residents and clients discover new ways to embrace life’s possibilities and new options for exploring their potential. Follow @begroupliving on Twitter.

Contact:
Jackie Gibson
Content Director
Imagination.
312-382-7862
jgibson@imaginepub.com

New Vertical Platform Wheelchair Lifts Announced by Butler Mobility

November 20, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Butler Mobility’s vertical platform wheelchair lifts are durable, easy to operate and virtually maintenance free.

Butler Mobility’s new Vertical Platform Wheelchair Lifts are a safe and economical solution to make any home accessible.   Indoors or outdoors, the Butler Mobility Vertical Platform Lift is a practical alternative to installing cumbersome, slow grade ramps.

Butler Mobility has a long history of manufacturing the “Lifts that Last” with their popular Inclined Platform Lift for wheelchairs.  Applying some of the same features and design concepts used in the Inclined Platform Lift, Butler Mobility is proud to introduce the next in line of high quality residential wheelchair accessibility products.

Our Vertical Platform Wheelchair Lift is a perfect solution for direct access to almost any area in your home.  This Platform Lift is adjustable to lift or lower to the exact height required by the individual consumer.  The easy to use control paddle and key lock make it a safe and reliable means of staying independent and mobile.

Standard safety features include 42” high solid side panels, automatic folding access ramp, emergency stop switch, non skid platform and ramp, powder coated finish with weather sealed controls, manual emergency crank, constant pressure control with key lock, and bottom safety pan.

The Butler Vertical Platform Lift is easy to install, and comes with a standard 5-year conditional warranty.

These quiet and durable wheelchair lifts for home use are built to last, providing years worry-free use.

For more information about Butler Mobility’s Vertical Platform Wheelchair Lift, visit www.butlermobility.com or call toll-free 888-847-0804.

Media Contact
Patricia Small
psmall@butermobility.com
Butler Mobility Products

New Vertical Platform Wheelchair Lifts Announced by Butler Mobility

September 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

New Vertical Platform Wheelchair Lifts Announced by Butler Mobility

Butler Mobility’s vertical platform wheelchair lifts are durable, easy to operate and virtually maintenance free.

Butler Mobility’s new Vertical Platform Wheelchair Lifts are a safe and economical solution to make any home accessible.   Indoors or outdoors, the Butler Mobility Vertical Platform Lift is a practical alternative to installing cumbersome, slow grade ramps.

Butler Mobility has a long history of manufacturing the “Lifts that Last” with their popular Inclined Platform Lift for wheelchairs.  Applying some of the same features and design concepts used in the Inclined Platform Lift, Butler Mobility is proud to introduce the next in line of high quality residential wheelchair accessibility products.

Our Vertical Platform Wheelchair Lift is a perfect solution for direct access to almost any area in your home.  This Platform Lift is adjustable to lift or lower to the exact height required by the individual consumer.  The easy to use control paddle and key lock make it a safe and reliable means of staying independent and mobile.

Standard safety features include 42” high solid side panels, automatic folding access ramp, emergency stop switch, non skid platform and ramp, powder coated finish with weather sealed controls, manual emergency crank, constant pressure control with key lock, and bottom safety pan.
The Butler Vertical Platform Lift is easy to install, and comes with a standard 5-year conditional warranty.
These quiet and durable wheelchair lifts for home use are built to last, providing years worry-free use.

For more information about Butler Mobility’s Vertical Platform Wheelchair Lift, visit www.butlermobility.com or call toll-free 888-847-0804.

Media Contact
Pat Small
psmall@butermobility.com
Butler Mobility Products

In an Aging Society – Are Senior Citizens Driving Safely? by Diane Carbo

August 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Remember when you couldn’t wait until you were old enough to drive. Getting a driver’s license gave us an opportunity to experience a new freedom we did not have before. For those of us with two parents working, driving meant taking ourselves and our siblings to after school activities and work. Driving took us to a level of independence that we had not experienced before. In an aging society of drivers, those very same feelings exist in many today. Driving gives us a sense of independence and freedom, the ability to go out and socialize, go to work or to church. Safety issues are a concern as many move into the golden years. The life expectancy of seniors is increasing. There are more active senior citizens out on the road today than ever before. Since we all age differently, many aging adults, can drive into their seventies and eighties. As we age, the risks for having a serious car accident that requires hospitalization rises. Statistics show that fatal car accidents rise after the age of seventy.

If you know an aging adult driver who is experiencing difficulty with driving, it is important to carefully monitor the situation. This article can help you determine whether you should take steps to encourage the senior to stop driving.

An aging society and risk

Some key risk factors that affect our aging society are:

Vision declines affecting depth perception and ability to judge speed of oncoming traffic. Night vision becomes a problem as our eyes loose the ability to process light. By age 60, you need three times the amount of light that you did at age 20 in order to drive safely after nightfall. We also become more sensitive to bright light and glare. Signs and road markings can be difficult to see.

With age, flexibility may decrease as response time increases. A full range of motion is crucial on the road. Turning your head both ways to see oncoming traffic, moving both hands and feet can be difficult for those with chronic conditions such a rheumatoid arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults in an aging society will often need to begin to take medications. Certain medications, as well as a combination of medications and alcohol, can increase driving risk. Be aware and careful about medication side-effects and interactions between medications. It is important to talk to your pharmacist to be aware of interactions that could affect your driving safely. Some medications cause drowsiness.

Aging affects our quality of sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. Falling asleep at the wheel is a major concern for those that dose off during the day.

The beginning of dementia or mental impairment can make driving more dangerous. A decreased mental capacity or decrease tolerance to stressful driving situations such as complex and confusing intersections may cause delayed reactions to sudden or confusing situations on the road. An aging brain and body does not have the same response time as we did when we were younger.

Look for warning signs

There are multiple warning signs that an aging adult is becoming or is an unsafe driver. Some of them are small, but if there are multiple concerns it may be time to talk about your concerns with the aging driver. Warning signs of an unsafe driver include

 

  • Abrupt lane changes, braking, or acceleration.
  • Increase in the dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mailboxes, garage doors, curbs, etc
  • Trouble reading signs or navigating directions to get somewhere
  • Range-of-motion issues (looking over the shoulder, moving the hands or feet, etc.)
  • Becoming anxious or fearful while driving or feeling exhausted after driving
  • Experiencing more conflict on the road: other drivers honking; frustration or anger at other drivers. Oblivious to the frustration of other drivers towards them
  • Getting lost more often
  • Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs, pavement markings, or pedestrians
  • Slow reaction to changes in the driving environment
  • Increased traffic tickets or “warnings” by traffic or law enforcement officers
  • Forgetting to put on a safety belt

 

If you are concerned about an aging adult driver, closely monitor their driving before deciding whether they need a refresher coarse on their driving skills or approaching them to give up their driver’s license altogether. Ongoing and open communication is important to addressing the issue of driving. Studies conducted by Harvard and MIT show that while most drivers preferred to discuss the issue with their spouse, doctor or adult children (in that order), this is not the case for everyone. The right person may not necessarily be the most forceful or outspoken one, but rather someone whose judgment and empathy are especially trusted by the driver.

Talk with other family members, your doctor, and close friends to determine the best person for “the conversation.” Remember driving signifies independence, freedom and being self sufficient to active senior citizens. Realize you may meet with resistance and the aging driver may become defensive. Emotion may get in the way of a rational conversation. Express your concerns and give specific reasons for those concerns.

The goal is to get the aging driver be part of the decision making process

You may begin by asking your loved one to make some concessions because of your concerns.

 

  • Taking a driver refresher course
  • Not driving at night
  • Suggest they not drive on busy thoroughfares or during rush hour
  • Taking shorter trips
  • Not driving under adverse weather conditions
  • Encourage a visit to their primary care physician or pharmacist to go over medications that may affect driving skills. Your physician may be able to recommend a Driver Rehabilitation Specialist. This individual can assess driving safety by an office exam and driving test and make recommendations regarding special equipment or techniques that can improve the driver’s safety. Consider ways to decrease the need to drive. Check out alternatives to shopping by car, including:

  • Arrange for home deliveries of groceries and other goods, and try to arrange for home visits by clergy, medical and personal care providers, and government service providers.
  • Use financial services that don’t require bank visits, like automatic bill paying, direct deposit, and bank-by-phone or on-line banking services.

Fears of those living in an aging society 

Fear of isolation and decrease in socializing is a real concern for the aging driver. It is important to keep spirits high as the aging driver makes the adjustments to becoming a non driver. Be in tune to their need for fun, volunteering, work and religious activities. Create a transportation plan that can make it easier for the aging driver to give up driving. You can create a list of friends and family that are willing to drive, contact the church and the local Area Agency on Aging in regards to transportation programs in the area.

Some seniors may adjust better if they can keep their own car, but have others drive them. Their own car may feel more comfortable and familiar, and the sense of loss from not driving may be lessened. Remember, baby boomers have grown up walking out the door and being able to go where they want to go. We need to keep the aging adult driver and those on the road with them safe.

Diane Carbo RN- As a geriatric care manager, that has cared for her father and mother in law in their homes, she learned first hand how overwhelming, stressful, and time consuming caring for a loved one can be. Staying in their homes was very important to them. As a result, Diane started http://www.aginghomehealthcare.com to assist others age in familiar surroundings and avoid the emotional and frustrating task of maneuvering the medical delivery system

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Diane_Carbo

An Enjoyable Disney World Adventure For Senior Citizens by Herb Leibacher

August 6, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

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You have finally decided to go to Disney World. The difference between you and many of the others who decide to go is that you have been waiting to travel here for most of your life. But, now that you are able to go, you wonder if it is too late. Disney World is a kids place so will there really be enough for you to do as a Senior Citizen? Do not worry and do not hesitate to pack your bags because not only will you have a blast while there, you will leave feeling like a kid again!

Attractions and Shows

Disney World is known for its magic and their shows and attractions are no exception. You could literally fill up each of your days at Disney World by just attending the shows. While they do have traditional dinner and short shows you can enjoy, Disney World goes above and beyond with several of their longer shows such as the Hall of Presidents and Walt Disney’s Carousel of Progress at the Magic Kingdom. Disney’s Hollywood Studios also has two great attractions that you will easily enjoy. Both The Great Movie and Walt Disney: One Man’s Dream offer wonderful historical perspectives of both Walt Disney and movies. Another great place to find attractions you will enjoy will be the Animal Kingdom where you can visit a petting zoo, travel nature trails, and observe animals while learning about their care.

Rides

Trying to decide the kind of ride you will be able to experience may be a little worrisome as well but rest assured there are plenty of rides that are fun for everyone. Many of Disney’s rides are developed so they are safe for people of all ages. In the Magic Kingdom, take the gentle It’s a Small World boat ride to learn about the various cultures, visit the jungle on the Jungle Cruise, fly through Neverland on the magical Peter Pan’s Flight, explore the unknown of outer space on the Astro Orbiter, or discover the sea with your mates on the Pirates of the Caribbean. After that, head over to Epcot to explore the world of energy on Ellen’s Energy Adventure before experiencing the evolution of communication on the slow riding Spaceship Earth. Finally, let your adventurer out to observe animals on the Kilimanjaro Safari at the Animal Kingdom.

Resorts

You have many options for places to stay during your visit to Disney World. All resorts offer rooms with showers wide enough to roll a wheelchair into and that have tub handrails. Additionally, all resorts have handicap accommodated rooms. Just make sure you do ask questions about any specific need you may have when you book the reservation.

Additional Activities

While you are at Disney World, make sure you take the time to see as many of the shows and street events as possible. Not only are these fantastic shows, but they will give you a great opportunity to rest during the day as well. Each park offers a variety of shows during the day and do not forget the night shows with fantastic light and firework displays.

Disney World may seem to be a place for young kids, but really it is a place for the young at heart. Do not let this misconception be a reason you do not go. There is plenty to do and experience as a senior citizen, so book your vacation, pack your bags, and let the adventure begin.

Herb likes to write about Disney World. Please check out his website that contains Disney World Vacation information as well as Disney Fantasmic information.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Herb_Leibacher

Furniture Pieces That All Senior Citizens Need by Monika Kay

July 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

As you get older, the body starts to break down and simple tasks can suddenly become very difficult. Going down the stairs or taking a bath can pose hazards that previously never existed. It might eventually be necessary to purchase furniture and accessories that can help you to get around the house easier. Here are some pieces that senior citizens should consider purchasing in the immediate future.

A Wheelchair

A wheelchair can be purchased for able-bodied and disabled individuals alike. For people who can still walk, using a wheelchair once in a while can take away the strain that is often felt in the joints. For individuals who have great difficulty walking, a wheelchair allows them to travel for long distances and participate in out-of-the-home activities.

A Bath Lift

Bath lifts are great apparatuses for the home because they take away a lot of the danger that can be found in bathrooms. Slippery floors and spills can make entering the tub a precarious activity. Bath lifts, on the other hand, slowly lower individuals from the top of the tub to the bottom. This makes bath time a considerably safer time.

A Lift Chair

Getting up from the couch or the recliner can be much more difficult for senior citizens. A lift chair takes away this difficulty by raising the back end of the apparatus, helping an individual to get up from a sitting position into a standing one. This is a great chair for any living room or den.

A Reclining Bed

These types of beds are very similar to the ones found in hospitals in that they can recline and lift at the headboard and the baseboard. Reclining beds meant for the home are a lot more comfortable and a lot less sterile. This is really good for older individuals who may have difficulty sleeping or who need to rest in a certain position.

A CD Player

This might seem like an odd choice but it has to do with quality of life as opposed to practicality. Several studies have shown that music can enliven and excite even the most comatose individuals. Many senior citizens fight off depression and loneliness and great music is one of the best cures for these conditions.

When it comes to acquiring furniture, older individuals should purchase things according to their needs. Older and more fragile bodies require assistance and all furniture pieces should accommodate this. The better equipped a home is, the more likely an individual can continue to live a full and happy life.

You must absolutely check out and browse the Lift Chair Store if you want to save BIG on mobility furniture, lift recliners and more… http://www.lift-chair-store.com/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Monika_Kay

 

Planning Fun Activities for Senior Citizens by Matthew G Young

May 29, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Many senior citizens do not want to or cannot leave the house. There are many reasons for this, some are physically impaired and have trouble getting around, and others simply don’t leave because they believe that they have nothing to do. Either way, getting out of the house is important sometimes, if only for the sake of the joys that social gatherings bring. Maintaining existing friendships and creating new ones can mean a lot to elderly folks, especially if they have not left the house for a while.

There are many senior citizen friendly activities out there, the trick is to match an activity with an interest that they hold, and therefore will be more accepting of going out of the comfort zone that is their home. Many people enjoy playing cards or board games. This is a much better solution than something like going to a movie will create; when playing games, it is hard not to be social. Movies are not the best choice because, although fun, there is little opportunity for social exchange. Games foster relationships, especially games like canasta or trivial pursuit where you can play on teams.

Another great activity for senior citizens is craft making. A group of people being instructed in how to put together a scrap book or design simple jewelry for the first time promises to be very fruitful. Not only will they learn a fun new skill, but they will inevitably interact with others at nearby at their table.

Going to a zoo or to a museum is another great choice. If there are any disabilities or hindrances to mobility, this can be a frustrating thing, but most public gatherings and places now allow people to rent wheelchairs. This will make getting around a much easier task, even if the people you are with have difficulty walking. Electric wheelchairs are perhaps the best choice since these require minimal effort in using.

Finally, you can always just go to a coffee shop. Social gatherings don’t need to be big group affair; sometimes people feel more comfortable in an intimate setting. Taking a friend out for coffee is a great way to interact on a one on one basis. It’s hard not to have a good time when you are with a close friend or relative. Coffee shops are great public places to go to with a couple friends because of this.

The most important thing about choosing an activity is to make sure that the person you are with has fun. If the senior citizen you are caring for does not have fun, they will not be likely to give social outings a second chance. As a caretaker, it’s your job to care for them physically as well as emotionally. Making activities fun isn’t hard, but you do need to choose the right activity that will match their desires and wishes.

Matthew G. Young is a freelance writer who specializes in financial, sports, and health-related topics. To learn more about in home health care visit Paradise In Home Care

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matthew_G_Young

Traveling With Senior Citizens by Karissa Price

May 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Traveling with elderly patients can certainly be a challenge, but there are many things that caregivers and family members can do to make it easier, safer, and less stressful. Planning ahead is essential to make sure everything goes smoothly and also to ensure that the traveler gets the most for their money. Last minute bookings are often expensive and should be avoided if possible.

When flying, here are some tips for easier travel:

1. Arrive at the airport with plenty of time to spare; getting through security can take much longer if the airport is busy or the patient moves slowly, and having to rush will only add to the stress
2. If possible, arrange in advance to have a wheelchair available and access to any special services offered to senior citizens
3. Make sure that the traveler has all of their identification, insurance information, itinerary, money, and medications; have copies of any instructions from physicians about medications or medical devices such as a pacemaker
4. Try not to pack too many clothing or other items; comfortable shoes are definitely necessary
5. To make the actual flight more comfortable, take a pillow and reading material or anything else for entertainment on the flight such as crossword puzzles or card games.

A common theme among senior citizen travel is to visit out of town family members, especially children, grandchildren, or even great grandchildren for a special event or just for a vacation. As soon as a wedding, birthday, or graduation announcement arrives, start planning the vacation! In addition to visiting family, there are many vacation destinations that cater to senior citizens. Many cruise lines have special senior citizen cruises, which can be a wonderful social experience for any seniors who want to enjoy the company of others and make new friends on their trip. Many destinations (such as Branson, Missouri, for example) have tons of specialty tours for senior citizens. Caregivers can find an abundance of information online about these tours, and should also check with the Better Business Bureau to make sure they are legitimate companies before paying for anything.

For more information, please visit http://www.trustedhandsnetwork.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Karissa_Price

Where Can You Find Employment For Senior Citizens? by Raymond Angus

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Are you trying to locate employment for senior citizens? Is it for yourself?  Has the staggering economy scared you?

Are your carefully laid plans for a pleasant tour, although perhaps not  royal, through your golden years seem to be stalling? Will employment for senior  citizens be the answer to your dilemma?

You are not alone? The same feeling is infecting your senior citizen neighbor  next door, your sixty year old friend down at the retirement center, your old  buddy in the bowling league and your aging sister in Buffalo.

The truth is, you have options! We all do. Too often, we seniors tend to feel  betrayed by our government and left to fend for ourselves at the mercy of an  indifferent panicking society. Scrub away those thoughts!

You are no different than the forty old accountant that was cut loose by his  business firm, or the thirty five year old new car salesman who is left to his  own devices. You are just older than them, but you have a lot more going for you  than they do. Most of their experiences and trained talents and skills are still  down the road in front of them. Yours are spread out in a panorama behind  you.

Look back at your life. Now is the best of times for you to make the things  you have learned over the years put you up in front of the growing crowd of  employment seekers. If you were to write down all you have experienced, dealt  with, learned from, overcame, and grown from, it would fill an entire library  shelf.

Do you think that from all of this knowledge and living you can find some  things that would increase the performance and productivity of an employers  business.

Do you realize that the sum of all your hands on training and acquired  talents and skills would be of great value to some employer?

There are wheelbarrow loads of gold nuggets kicking around in your head, my  friend. Grab hold of a few of them and transform them into that perfect job you  are now dreaming about.

It is not as hard to accomplish this as you may think!

Here is a valuable gem of knowledge and fact that should stir up the juices  inside of you.

Most vacant employment positions are not even advertised! Whoa! What does  this tell you?

There is no competition for these jobs outside of word of mouth. Why? There  are many reasons why this is so.

Maybe the job has not been defined by the manager yet, he knows that the need  exists but what will he call it? You can step in and give him a definition. Do  some advance homework.

A harried business owner is overworked and wishing for a fairy godmother to  wave her wand and provide the perfect assistant. Check out the company and tell  him how much easier you can make his life, and earn him more profit as a  byproduct.

You read an item in the newspaper, or saw it on the TV news, about a business  making substantial growth spurts. That is your cue!

Call the company and inform them all the things you can do for them, and let  them know you will be stopping by tomorrow, would he or she have time to spend a  few moments with you.

Where can you look for employment for senior citizens? In your own head! Take  advantage of your own experience and skills.

There are jobs out there waiting for you. Be creative and bold. It will  happen!

Raymond Angus is the author of http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com. He writes about how fellow  seniors find work in today’s economy. Do you want to know where the seniors’  jobs are and how to get one? Go to http://www.TheSeniorsLife.com and click on  employment/jobs/retirees.

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Incremental Retirement – Sensible Advice For Senior Citizens by Jerry Elrod

May 15, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Many senior citizens just won’t retire. They are ambitiously alive. They stay  busy. They love what they do. They are not putting off retirement because of  economic issues. They either own their business or are in a situation in which  their business gives them so much permission that the business can do quite well  without them. That is, of course, a fortunate place to be. They are in  incremental retirement. They are doing it in stages. For the most part, they  don’t keep rigid or strict hours. They are fully aware of what’s going on in  their business or their lives, but they don’t obsess over it. An acquaintance  is, at 70, building a new office and expanding his business. It is not to “make  more money” for himself. He gives it all away to his family and causes he  believes in.

Another person travels a great deal, sometime in a humongous motor home. He  is quite well off, but he chases around Texas doing what he does for his  business.

Still another is a retired judge, but still a practicing lawyer. He and his  spouse spend enormous time enjoying themselves with frequent travel forays and  maintain an elegant antebellum home in East Texas. When home, he still keeps a  busy roster of clients.

Incremental Retirement, whether continuing to pursue business or professional  interests, is a healthy way to retire. It doesn’t have to happen all at once.  One need not surrender the things of ones previous life all at once. Keeping up  with events and excitement in ones “career” world is a healthy way to stimulate  body, mind and soul.

Incremental Retirement means you may do it on your own terms. You can plan to  have a three-month hiatus, while the wheels keep turning. You can generate new  excitement and energy for living. You can even expand your career interests in  ways that will provide further for family, charity, a foundation, and a life of  absolute satisfaction.

So, look at Incremental Retirement, if you are fortunate like many senior  citizens, which may round out your life in enormously gratifying ways.

Article provided by Dr. Jerry D. Elrod. Dr Elrod, and his wife, Dr Sharon  Shaw Elrod, manage Senior Citizen Journal online. For information on retirement,  Baby Boomers and everything related to Seniors, please visit my blog at http://www.seniorcitizenjournal.com/. Links to  other Senior Citizen Journal pages can be found on the blog.

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Planning Senior Citizens Trips – The Benefits of Bus Tours by Bronwyn White

May 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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Are you retired, or planning to retire? Would you like to see the world  without the hassle of preparing for a vacation?. Planning your future senior  citizens trips can be hassle free if you decide to consider bus tours Read on to  see how much easier it is to join a bus tour instead of planning your vacation  from scratch.

The Problem With Vacations

The main problem with vacations is the preparation you have to do beforehand.  All that effort put into booking flights, finding hotels, creating an itinerary,  finding travel insurance providers, etc. can really take its toll, which is  ironic when you remember you’re a senior trying to relax!

That’s why bus tours and group tours for seniors are gaining popularity as a  hassle-free alternative to the traditional way of vacationing, particularly  those planning their senior citizens trips in retirement or semi-retirement. All  you need to do is find the tour package that suits your expectations, pay the  price, and then follow the travel agency’s instructions!

The Advantages Of Bus Tours

The main advantage of bus tours is the fact that it’s stress-free and  hassle-free on your part — the travel agencies have done all the work for you!  All you have to do is to choose the package, pay up, be there in time for the  bus, and then start taking photos!

Another advantage of bus tours is the cost. When you plan a vacation the  traditional way, almost every move costs money. When you book your flights —  money. When you make hotel reservations — money. When you take cabs to the six  tourist spots you plan to see today — money!

But when it comes to bus tours, you pay a single fee for the whole package,  which can last several days. What’s more, seniors bus tours often come at a  discount, making the whole vacation even more affordable and enjoyable for you!  Just sign the dotted line, and off you go.

How To Prepare For A Bus Tour

The first step in preparing for a bus tour vacation is choosing your  destination. What part of the world would you want to see? What town or country  has been on your “must-visit” list for the past few decades? Now’s the time to  take your pick without having to think about work when you get back!

Next, find suitable travel agencies that have tour packages in your chosen  destination(s). Choose the travel agency with the package that fits your budget  and schedule perfectly. You can also check if the travel agency offers travel  insurance — very important if you REALLY want to enjoy yourself!

And finally, start packing! Bus tour packages can last several days, so make  sure to pack enough clothes, medicine, and toiletries for the entire trip. Take  a backpack if your back is strong enough, but if you don’t mind having only one  free hand most of the time, take a lighter travel case on wheels.

Don’t Believe The Bad Hype!

Most younger vacationers dismiss bus tours as “boring” and “predictable,” but  they don’t enjoy the sophistication that only age can bring. As seniors, we tend  to enjoy a more relaxed, more cultured pace. So leave the stress to the young  ones and take that vacation you’ve been waiting for all these years!

Bronwyn White has over 20 years experience in the travel industry. She has  gained her experience as a travel agent, with airlines, government tourism  boards and as a professional travel researcher (yes there is such a dream job).  She consults on a regular basis to the travel industry and is often quoted in  the press. Bronwyn has specialized in senior citizen clientele – both as a  travel agent and as a travel researcher. For tons of free travel advice, just  for seniors, visit www.seniorstraveltips.com  [http://www.seniorstraveltips.com/seniors-bus-tours/]

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Marketing Real Estate to Senior Citizen Buyers by Marte Cliff

May 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Have you noticed? Senior citizens aren’t as old as they used to be. At least  some aren’t. And that means you cannot market to all seniors in the same  way.

Senior buyers come in two varieties. The first are those who are actually  suffering from the ravages of age – and are only too happy to tell you all about  it. They’ll give you a list of ailments and things they can no longer do, so  your job in finding them a home is a bit more straightforward.

You can openly discuss issues like stairways, counter heights, doorway  widths, and space to install grab bars in the bathroom. They’ll tell you what  they need and want so you can go out and find it for them.

When you’re selling to this group, go preview homes before you take them  along.

When people are having a hard time getting around, need a wheelchair or  walker, or are just unsteady on their feet, they don’t need to be dragged around  looking at all the wrong homes. They won’t appreciate you wasting their energy  by showing them homes that are obviously wrong.

So pay careful attention to their needs, and if you eliminate a house they’ve  asked about, tell them why. It might be because the bathrooms and bedrooms are  on the second floor and the laundry room is in the basement – or perhaps because  of steep steps leading to the house. Maybe the garage is too narrow to allow  them room to put a wheel chair in and out of the car, or the bathroom door is  too narrow for the wheel chair to get through.

Do your homework, tell them the straight facts, and you’ll earn their  loyalty.

This segment of the senior population may be focused on living within minutes  of a medical facility, and they’ll probably tell you which one.

But what about the second group? What about the ones who are  officially senior citizens, but have no intention of acknowledging the fact?

You’d do well not to mention the words “Senior citizen” in their  presence.

Instead, find out more about them and their lives. Many are still working, so  see if they want to locate near the workplace. After that, inquire about hobbies  and other leisure time activities. Your new seniors may be avid golfers, they  may want to hit the gym three days a week, they make require fast access to a  swimming pool, or perhaps want to locate near a boarding facility where they can  keep a horse.

They may even want a home with a bit of pasture so they can take care of that  horse themselves.

Don’t assume anything. Some seniors are anxious to leave yard care  behind so they can pursue other interests, while others have been waiting for  retirement to have time to landscape a yard and grow a huge garden.

Take the time to listen. Listening is important no matter who your  client is, but when you’re selling to senior citizens, you need to listen to the  subtle hints as well as the open statements.

Remember, in the back of their minds, they’re recognizing the possibility of  ill-health in the future. How could they avoid it, with the television and  newspapers shouting it at every turn?

They know that the day could be coming soon when they won’t be able to easily  navigate those stairways – and they know that a wheel chair could be a part of  their future. They may even have a secret fear of living too far from a medical  facility.

But many simply do not want to talk about that. So don’t bring it up  unless they do.

Selling to seniors isn’t really all that different from selling to anyone  else. Your job is to listen and pay  attention to what you hear. When you do  that with each and every customer and client you’ll be head and shoulders above  your competition – because listening is almost a lost art.

Marte Cliff is a Freelance Copywriter and former real estate broker who  specializes in writing for real estate and related industries.

Marte offers a free mini-course for Realtors trying to build a business, as  well as web copywriting and lead generation packages. Learn more about them at  http://www.copybymarte.com

Marte offers a weekly ezine for real estate professionals and others with an  interest in marketing themselves or their property. To subscribe, and get a copy  of her report: How to Get Referrals & Testimonials, visit her at http://www.marte-cliff.com

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Senior Citizen Abuse by Jessie Penn

May 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

News headlines report of senior citizen abuse, most everyday. Long gone are  the values and moralities of our grandparent’s generation. Time was when a  handshake, or your word was all that was necessary to honor commitments. Gone  are the days on an unlocked house, open windows, or sitting out back alone.

The elderly in today’s society can, unfortunately, encounter many traumatic  events for no cause of their own. Predators watch and learn learn an old  person’s schedule, like, when they leave their homes and when they are likely to  return, what times they get up or go to bed, and if they are handicapped or ill  by the comings and goings of a visiting nurse.

Many in the society of today appear to have lost all respect for other  people’s property. It seems these people are without limits, with nothing more  important than self-serving tactics. Who cares if an old person is lonely, in  pain, or needs assistance?

Many times, the media tells us about a kid that brutally beat elderly  parents, grandparents, or elderly strangers. Without any motivation, other than  pursuing what they want, senior citizens can become their prey. And, if they  want something you have in your home, you could be their next victim.

But, not all attackers are strangers, and the elderly person might not be  beaten, robbed, or brutally murdered by the hands of an unknown person.  Sometimes, the attacker is a family member, relative, or friend.

When elderly people are attacked or threatened, how are they to protect  themselves? Many don’t possess the strength or agility to fight back or run.  They can fall down stairs, against door jams, or be trapped in a wheelchair.  Many times they do not understand what or why this is happening to them, because  the person doing them harm is someone they trusted.

Perhaps a friend or relative lives in the senior citizen’s home to provide  assistance and/or companionship. This person might get angry because they don’t  want the responsibility of caring for an older person. Perhaps they feel as if  their freedom has been taken from them. If the elderly person has adequate  finances, the one that is supposed to be looking out for the well-being of the  senior begins to feel that they should be compensated or rewarded  excessively.

An elderly person who refuses to give money or sign over their property,  risks being violently attacked by a family member or friend. It could be an  adult son or daughter, grandson or granddaughter, or a friend. Most elderly  people hesitate to report abuse from a relative or friend. Many are in failing  health, and don’t know who to turn to for help. Or, perhaps, they fear the  attacker will retaliate and things will get much worse, if they report the  abuse.

Aging can be a lonely and painful experience. Some senior citizens were  attacked and left alone to endure the pain and shame. Many could not get to  their phone to call for help. But, if they would have had an emergency alarm,  the help they needed could have been summoned.

A small device, disguised as a pendant or wristwatch can save lives,  literally. There is no need to get to a phone. Help and assistance is no further  away than the end of the finger. As easy as pushing a button on the device calls  an emergency operator, and help can be on the way.

Many times, long-term injuries or death can be the result of not being able  to get the care when it is needed. A personal security device can provide peace  of mind, and is a true friend in need. Senior citizens can live independently  knowing they have the ability to get help whenever they need.

Get free information to protect your loved ones when a medical emergency or  security treat happens. Go to http://personalsecuritydevices.walkinsarewelcome.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jessie_Penn

 

Safety Tips for Traveling With Senior Citizens by David Stillwagon

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Feeling safe and secure is vital when you are traveling whether you are  traveling by yourself or with a group or family. It is always a big concern when  you have children especially when you are in an area that isn’t familiar to you.  Children have a habit of wandering away so keeping an eye on them is extremely  important. But it isn’t just children that need to be careful when traveling;  senior citizens also have to extra cautious.

Before you head out the door it is always a good idea whether you are a  senior citizen or not to check to make sure that your medications are with you.  Forgotten things like medication can be a major disruption to your trip.

A good detailed itinerary is the best place to start when planning a trip  with senior citizens. Knowing the times of travel, how long it is going to be  before getting there and what you will be doing helps to lessen the confusion  and questions that might arise. If you are traveling by car you should make an  estimate on how long the trip will take. If you are traveling with senior  citizens they may need more breaks should include that with your estimate.  Taking your time when traveling and enjoying the ride makes it more pleasant for  everyone.

If you are travelling on a plane then you need to take a few things into  account such as giving yourself plenty of time at the airport to check in and go  to the rest room if necessary. If the airport is large then you might want to  request a wheelchair if your senior citizen traveling partner gets tired on  their feet. Remember also that security is a lot tighter now so the time that  you are standing in line has increased greatly.

Seating arrangements on a plane or a bus should be considered with the older  adult in mind. If they have to take more restroom breaks that it is a good idea  to get them an aisle seat close to the restroom that way they won’t be have to  be climbing over folks.

After the plane ride is over and you leave the plane it might be a good time  to take a rest and a bathroom break. While the plane ride might not be tiring to  you it might be to others. A little rest now will definitely help out later.

Planning ahead and taking all the right precautions can make for enjoyable  trips with senior citizens.

David Stillwagon blogs about age and health issues

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Senior Citizen Travel Insurance: What You Need To Know by Jane Conway

April 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Finding travel insurance can be difficult for anyone, but if you are over a  certain age, then you may discover that getting the coverage you need is even  more challenging. This article covers the basics of why finding senior citizen  travel insurance can be more difficult, and what specifics you need to look for  in your plan.

In the world of insurance, money talks. Money, and statistics. And according  to statistics, senior citizens are more likely to make insurance claims than are  younger travelers. This results in less money made and more money paid out by  the insurance companies. The result? They are reluctant to offer insurance plans  to travelers over a certain age. While some insurers cap their age limits at 65,  others may go as high as 70, 75, or even 80. Still, over a certain age, you’ll  be unable to get travel insurance with many agencies, no matter how good your  current health is. Other companies may offer coverage, but at higher costs, and  with fewer benefits.

Not only is travel insurance for seniors more difficult to find, there are  also a lot of needs and issues that you may need to think about in an insurance  plan. For example, older travelers are more likely to have preexisting  conditions that need covered. Many older travelers will also be bringing medical  equipment or medications with them. Things such as walkers, wheelchairs, or  prescription drugs, can be easily lost or stolen, and they can be difficult and  expensive to replace while you are traveling. A good senior citizen travel  insurance plan will have coverage for these things. Another thing to think about  as you are looking for your travel insurance plan is to look out for reduced  benefits. As mentioned above, it is not uncommon for insurers to offer higher  costs and less coverage to seniors. Make sure that you know the exact details of  the plan that you are purchasing,

If you are having trouble finding insurance through regular insurers, then  you may want to consider looking into specialty plans. There are a number of  companies out there that specialize in travel insurance for senior citizens. Not  only do they have no upper age limit, they also give you specific coverage that  is tailored to your needs as an older traveler. With these plans, it is much  easier and hassle-free to get coverage for your preexisting conditions or for  medical equipment. Many people also find that they have some insurance cover  through retirement organizations that they belong to. Check to find out what  coverage you already have.

The most important thing is to make sure that you have coverage when you  travel. You never know what medical problems, injuries, or disasters may happen,  and the last thing that you want is to spend your precious retirement years  burdened with financial debt.

Check out these resources if you need more information about senior citizen travel insurance, or age concern travel insurance.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jane_Conway

 

Senior Citizens Can Become Great Customers by Michael McCann

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
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If you think the senior citizen market isn’t dynamic, then you’re really out  of touch with marketing. Thirty-five percent of our population is over 55 years  old, and these very affluent seniors control almost 45 percent of the disposable  income of our country.

Neither Madison Avenue nor the advertising agency down the block takes this  group seriously, and as a result, the market is virtually untapped. Here are  four suggestions on how to target your business efforts to penetrate this  market.

o Gain an understanding of this large market… Throw out  everything you ever heard about the over-55 group. These people are vibrant and  full of life. They are looking for new ideas, challenges, and new and innovative  ways to enjoy life. Thanks to Social Security, wise investing and good  retirement plans, they have the money to pay for what they want. Most senior  citizens want what you want: health, happiness and security. Many want  excitement, romance and adventure. They want to maintain close ties with their  children and grandchildren.

o Target products and services… Yes, senior citizens want to  know about cruise ships, vitamins and wheelchairs, but so do thousands of people  under 55.

The difference is that seniors are looking for solutions to problems. They  want to make their life easier and more enjoyable, and they have the money to  pay for the services and products that can help them achieve these goals. If  your product solves a specific problem, you will find this market is for  you.

o How to advertise to seniors… Forget the flowery phrases, cute  word plays and fast-action ads. Senior citizens want to know the facts and what  benefits those facts will provide for them.  Your products and services are just  the carrier of benefits, not benefits in themselves.

Seniors want to know how your offering will make life easier or better or  more fun. Problem solving is high on the list of benefits wanted, and proof of  claim is requirement. Straight talk is appreciated, and as usual, a picture is  worth a thousand words.

Two-step advertising works well in the senior market. Seniors have time, so  snap decisions are seldom made. Advertisements that offer more information work  especially well. Always be positive in your advertising, and never talk down to  your audience. Most seniors are a lot smarter than you or I.

o Things to avoid… It is not a good idea to sell marginal ideas  to senior citizens such as work-at-home projects and get-rich-quick business  schemes. The senior lobby had watchdog groups looking for scam artists, and  these two topics top the list of no-nos. Get on their list and you will find  your business in trouble.

If you’re looking for the best source of information as to how to advertise  to the senior market, read what they read. Buy some of the newsstand magazines  on retirement, vacations, travel, cooking or investing targeted toward seniors,  and read both the articles and the ads. Find copies of Modern Maturity.  This and other magazines and periodicals will provide valuable insight into how  to advertise to this lucrative market.

Make more money faster by easily connecting with hard-to-reach decision  makers who can buy your products and services…NOW! Get started free by getting  Michael McCann’s new Special Report excerpted from his newest edition of his  popular business development book, Connecting with Key Decision Makers (How to  Reach Hard-to-Reach Businesspeople Who Can Say “Yes”)…just for asking at http:/www.GlobalBusinessCafe.com/  http://Twitter.com/MikeHMcCann Go now!

Michael McCann is a 25-year veteran of developing unique and professional  business development programs that create tangible results for individuals and  companies. Let him help you instantly…free!

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Depression in Senior Citizens by David Crumrine

April 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

Depression is a medical condition that is characterized by feeling down,  depressed, or hopeless; low self-esteem; and loss of interest in things one used  to enjoy. Senior citizens are prone to life-altering changes that can lead one  to feel depressed. Dealing with the trials life throws at us such as, loss,  change, loneliness, or a chronic medical condition can be quite overwhelming.  Still, depression is not a “normal” part of aging. Like heart disease or  diabetes, depression is a medical condition and it can be treated with  medication and therapy. Treatment is effective at alleviating symptoms within a  few weeks in at least 80 percent of people.

It is important that senior citizens and those providing their elder care  understand the symptoms of depression. If you think you or someone you know may  be suffering from depression, identify your symptoms by using the checklist  provided below. Then, if necessary, seek assistance. For senior citizens, the  most frequently used resource is a family doctor. Bringing a trusted friend or  relative may help ease any anxiety when going to an appointment. Understand that  your doctor may suggest a checkup and begin treatment or refer you to a mental  health specialist.

Before you say, “I’m okay”….

Do you feel:

  • Anxious or “empty”
  • Guilty or useless
  • Agitated or irritable
  • Less interested in things you used to enjoy
  • Like no one loves you
  • Life is not worth living

Or if you are:

  • A change in sleeping habits
  • A change in eating habits
  • Persistent headaches, stomach aches, or pain

Remember that these  may be real symptoms of a real medical condition that can be effectively  treated. Talk to your doctor today. Though many senior citizens suffer from  depression, feeling depressed is not a normal part of aging.

 

Health and Wellness tips

There are many measures senior citizens can take to help relieve the symptoms  of depression. Those involved in the elder care of senior citizens experiencing  depression should encourage the senior to follow these tips and improve their  wellbeing.

Check your medications. Senior citizens often take many  medications. Some medications, including those for sleep, blood pressure, and  nervousness, may affect mood. Talk with your doctor about each of the  medications you are taking. Be sure to include all over-the-counter medicines,  vitamins, and herbal supplements to minimize the chances of having side  effects.

Limit alcohol consumption. Alcohol use can bring about  depression. And, when alcohol and drugs are combined, interactions that lead to  depression can occur.

Stay connected. Sometimes, senior citizens find it more difficult  to get out and stay connected with others. Still, talking with friends and  family members, getting a pet, or even finding a new interest or hobby can help  one through this tough time.  Get involved in activities you take pleasure  in, such as reading a good book, going to a ballgame or a taking a class in a  subject that interests to you.

Be active. Physical activity can improve physical and mental  wellbeing. Though some senior citizens believe they cannot exercise, there are  activities like walking, gardening, or working out (even if one is in a  wheelchair) that can be helpful. Make a goal of 30 minutes of activity 5 days a  week. If you have not taken part in physical activity in a while, be sure to  check with your doctor and get his OK before you begin.

Eat healthy and drink plenty of fluids. Choose healthy snacks  like fruits, vegetables, yogurt, or nuts to increase your nutrition and energy.  Also, try to eat well-balanced meals.  Some senior citizens suffer from  loss of appetite and weight loss; if you have experienced either of these,  consult your doctor.

The Caring Space http://www.TheCaringSpace.com

David Crumrine at the Caring Space We are an organization that connects  caregivers and care seekers, providing an easy and affordable resource for  families seeking care for friends/loved ones and caregivers seeking  employment.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Crumrine

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3021412

Landscape Seniority: Safe & Efficient Tools for Senior Gardening and Lawn Care

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles 

One is never too old to enjoy the great outdoors by tending to the garden or mowing the lawn. Your golden years aren’t the time to delegate tasks to others or relinquish landscaping. Plenty of tools exist to make gardening and landscaping a breeze. With the appropriate ergonomic tools and judicious decision-making, you can safely continue your outdoor housekeeping for years to come.

Lawn Care

It may be tempting to give the kid next door a few bucks to mow your lawn, but why not do it yourself? You’ll continue to gain strength and endurance as well as a sense of satisfaction after a freshly mowed lawn. Seniors should consider a mower that’s easy to operate and one that poses little risk. For example, seniors can comfortably sit down on zero-turn mowers and cut the lawn at a swift pace. They can turn on a dime by rotating 180 degrees around its own axis and are adept at swerving around lawn obstacles. Another shrewd choice is the push reel mower, powered by nothing but your own body. These are the simplest mowers one can buy. Speaking of buying, they’re also the least expensive. It’s true that they may take the most effort, but reel mowers require the least maintenance, and they’re the safest by far.

Low-Maintenance Grass

Your lawn needn’t be full of attention-starved grass that requires consistent and frequent work. TreeHugger.com suggests a number of grass types that need little maintenance and water. Zoysia grass, Bermuda grass, St. Augustine grass, buffalo grass and fescue are convenient choices that will grow on despite neglect.

Ergonomic Gardening

Ergonomics is the science of maximizing the efficiency of equipment by reducing discomfort and fatigue for the user. When it comes to seniors and gardening, ergonomic tools are a godsend.

Self-Watering Container – The EarthBox, or a similar self-made self-watering container, provides an incredibly simple solution to growing plants. As its name suggests, this container waters automatically by way of a water reservoir. The EarthBox’s fertilizer strips gives plants the exact nutrients they need without any work on your part.

Radius Shovel – TreeHugger.com suggests the Radius shovel for gardening use. This ergonomic shovel is built with a lightweight fiberglass handle suitable for arthritic gardeners. A sharp and heavy blade easily cuts into the most compacted of soil.

Landscaper’s Wagon – Wheels make everything easier. Plop your heavy pots, plants and gardening materials in the wagon to easily cart off to your garden. Its pneumatic tires traverse the harshest terrain. Plus, the wagon’s sides fold down and form a flatbed.

Garden Kneeler – The garden kneeler cushions your knees during your gardening. The two side handles enable you to raise and lower yourself without back strain. When flipping the eight pound garden kneeler over, it takes on a second function as a comfortable bench.

The Little Engine That Could Earns Her Whistle

March 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Press-Media Releases 

Believing that anything is possible, believing that magic can be found anywhere, and above all believing in oneself are all lessons to be found in ArtsPower National Touring Theatre’s new musical version of the beloved children’s classic The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle.  The Little Blue Engine, against all odds, finds a way to conquer her fears and demonstrate the extraordinary strength of “I think I can!”  This original production is being presented by the city of Las Vegas March 9, at 10:30 a.m., at the Historic Fifth Street School located at 401 S. Fourth St. All tickets are $3. Visit www.artslasvegas.org or call (702) 229-3515 or 229-6469 for more information.

 

At the Piney Vale Train Station, the overbearing the Silver Engine keeps things running efficiently and always on time.  Silver has no patience for the Little Blue, who – to everyone but dependable old Rusty – seems far too small to pull the Piney Vale Express.  Little Blue, not to be discouraged, expresses her desire to see the exciting world outside the train yard in the song “All Aboard!”

When Silver forces Rusty to retire, however, Little Blue’s dreams start to look like they may never be realized.  Even her erstwhile “best friend” Little Red, promoted to pull the Piney Vale Express in Rusty’s place, begins to question Little Blue’s resolve.

Little Red hurts her wheel and can’t pull the Piney Vale Express after all.  Suddenly, everything depends on Little Blue.  Rusty’s unflagging encouragement gives her even more confidence, and she tackles her challenging mission in “The Big Journey.”  At the show’s joyful conclusion, Little Blue completes the route successfully and can finally say “I thought I could!”

The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle features a dynamic, Broadway-style score and colorful, inventive sets and costumes.  The production was adapted and directed by ArtsPower’s artistic director Greg Gunning; Greg also wrote the lyrics, while Richard DeRosa created and orchestrated the musical score.

Mark Blackman and Gary Blackman founded ArtsPower in 1985 and have been steering its course ever since.  ArtsPower has grown into one of America’s premiere producers of professional theatre for young and family audiences. Its 27 professional touring musicals and dramas have been seen by 12 million people in 48 states – from Alaska to Florida – in hundreds of the nation’s top cultural centers, including the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC and Lincoln Center in New York.

“For many children, The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle may be the first stage production they ever see,” says executive producer Gary Blackman.  “Our goal is not only to teach them valuable lessons about self-reliance, but also to instill in them a genuine love of theatre.”

For more information on the Verona, New Jersey-based company or any of its programs, please call 973.239.0100 or visit ArtsPower’s website at www.artspower.org.

 

Note to editors: Downloadable images of ArtsPower’s musical productions are available at www.artspower.org.  To request a hard copy photo or to arrange an interview with Gary Blackman, Mark Blackman, or Greg Gunning, please contact ArtsPower at 973.239.0100.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Helping Hands of Vegas Valley – Las Vegas

August 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Support Services 

www.hhovv.org

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SERVING SENIORS in SOUTHERN NEVADA

No Cost Services Assist Seniors to Remain Independent

  Established in 2000, Helping Hands of Vegas Valley is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with the mission to provide free, assistive services to senior citizens in Southern Nevada, allowing them to maintain their dignity and independence while improving health and daily living.

Our services include:

  • Transportation
  • Food Pantry
  • Respite Care Vouchers

Volunteer at your convenience!

SERVICES

We are a community agency providing the following free services to seniors 60 and over in the Las Vegas Valley.

Transportation

Transportation

HHOVV has two Para transit buses that can accommodate wheelchair clients. Rides are provided for medical appointments, grocery store shopping and other errands.

HHOVV volunteer drivers provide transportation to and from medical appointments, shopping trips and errands. All volunteers receive orientation training and a background check.

New clients meet with HHOVV’s intake coordinator for an assessment and must be 60 years of age or older, show proof of Nevada residency and display a need for assistance. Individuals needing services are typically alone and frail, chronically ill, homebound, and/or dependent on a primary caregiver. Reassessments are completed on an annual basis. HHOVV does not charge for these services. Volunteers and staff do not accept tips, gifts, fees, loans or anything of value from clients.

To be added to the waiting list for transportation services please contact Myrna or Nichole at 702-633-7264 x29.

Respite Care Vouchers

Respite Care Vouchers

The HHOVV respite voucher program is funded by the state Aging and Disabled Services Division and provides temporary relief for caregivers. Individuals who do not take time off while caring for a loved one may compromise their physical and mental well-being. Utilizing respite services is one way to reduce stress, allowing individuals to be more effective caregivers. Also, using respite services may delay early institutionalization

Food Pantry

Food Pantry

HHOVV also keeps a food pantry stocked with non-perishable items and delivers a free bag once a month to clients who meet eligibility requirements. Clients must be 60 years of age or older, show proof of Nevada residency and proof that their annual income is at or below 150% of current poverty guidelines. To become a pantry recipient a senior may call 702-633-7264 x22 and leave their name and phone number.

The organization accepts donations of non-perishable food items at a warehouse office in North Las Vegas. Donations are always appreciated!

If you are interested in holding a food drive for HHOVV please contact Lorri Highet at 702-633-7264 x30.

An organization serving the Seniors of Las Vegas.

2320 Paseo Del Prado #B112

Las Vegas, NV 89102

702-633-7264

E-mail: hhofvv@aol.com

Nevada-Senior-Guide The Bridge – Las Vegas

www.thebridgeatparadisevalley.com

The Bridge

The Bridge of Paradise ValleyRetirement when you want it. Assistance when you need it.Imagine living in a beautiful, peaceful environment, surrounded by friends and activities.

Enjoy an enriching retirement at The Bridge at Paradise Valley

Our community facilities are specifically designed to encourage seniors to live their retirement years as actively and as independently as possible. Assisted Living at The Bridge at Paradise Valley allows seniors to live carefree lifestyles – because we take care of the details! Our services include restaurant-style dining, housekeeping, and apartment maintenance. We are committed to making The Bridge at Paradise Valley a place you will love to call home right here in Las Vegas Nevada!

The Bridge at Paradise Valley features the finest in Assisted Living. With stunning surroundings, outstanding services and an abundance of amenities, our residents are proud to call The Bridge at Paradise Valley home. Independent Living combines community living with the privacy of your own apartment, and Assisted Living offers the same amenities in addition to personalized services. From a dynamic activities schedule to our hospitable staff, our goal is to promote an active, carefree lifestyle.

Our residents enjoy restaurant-style dining, housekeeping services, scheduled transportation, apartment  maintenance and a full calendar of recreational and wellness activities as part of a convenient,  month-to-month lease.  And, from live  entertainment to themed parties and local outings, our events are catered to seniors.

We welcome the opportunity to introduce you to our services  and to show you how The Bridge at Paradise Valley offers a rejuvenating retirement  lifestyle.

The Bridge at Paradise Valley is part of the Century Park family of senior living communities. Headquartered in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Century Park manages senior retirement properties located throughout the   United States.

Discover The Bridge at Paradise Valley

Life at The Bridge at Paradise Valley offers opportunities and advantages that seniors in the Las Vegas region have come to love and want to keep as part of their active lifestyle.

Las Vegas, Nevada, is more than just bright lights and luxury resorts. It is a great place to live. Located at the southern tip of the Sierra Nevadas, Las Vegas was founded by Mormon missionaries in 1902. World class shopping, dining, and entertainment are all easily accessible from The Bridge at Paradise Valley.

There are plenty of activities available to the Assisted Living residents at The Bridge at Paradise Valley. Some of the weekly choices include Bingo, card games, and Wii games. However, there is always time for relaxation, and The Bridge at Paradise Valley’s park-like grounds – which include a gazebo and a picnic area – are the perfect place for a leisurely visit with family or friends.

Senior Care Facility located in Las Vegas Nevada

Outstanding Retirement Services and Amenities

At The Bridge at Paradise Valley, you will discover a truly unique way to live.  We specialize in combining elegant amenities with the comforts of home.  Our outstanding services are offered in an inviting atmosphere where caring, professional staff lavish you with attention while respecting your individuality and privacy.

Facilities

  • Several apartment floor plans to choose from
  • Community dining room
  • Wellness center
  • Cozy lounge with fireplace
  • Beauty salon and barber shop
  • Gift shop
  • Ice cream parlor
  • Library

Services

  • Delicious restaurant-style dining three times each day planned by a registered dietician
  • Daily living assistance including bathing, dressing, and medication management
  • Transportation throughout the week
  • Housekeeping service

Activities

  • Wii games
  • Bingo
  • Restaurant outings
  • Exercise classes
  • Afternoon socials
  • Many other social, recreational, educational programs, and cultural events

Grounds Features

  • Landscaped courtyards with gazebo and picnic area
  • Beautifully maintained grounds perfect for walking

 

 

2205 E. Harmon
L.V. NV 89119
702-369-6964


Assisted living communities offer help with non-medical aspects of daily activities in an atmosphere of separate, private living apartments that encourage independence. In addition to providing meals, transportation for medical appointments, activities and pleasure trips, assisted living provides linens and laundry service, assistance with dressing and bathing, reminders regarding medication, and assistance with eating, transferring to and from a wheelchair, toileting, etc. This group setting also provides daily social activities and entertainment for the residents.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!