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young adults | Nevada Senior Guide

The Programmed Cellular Death Approach to Anti-Aging Treatment

May 8, 2016 by · Comments Off on The Programmed Cellular Death Approach to Anti-Aging Treatment
Filed under: General 

Modern anti-aging treatment is built on a common base of knowledge that I will quickly review. Biochemistry and molecular biology tell us there are many types of chemical reactions going on in the human body. We know that it is the genetic information programmed inside our cellular DNA that defines what reactions occur. Genetic information, expressed in regulated ways, builds the body’s proteins and enzymes, and controls how enzymes carry out the cell’s biochemical reactions.

This information, contained in the DNA of our genome, consists of many thousands of long, often repetitive, sequences of base pairs that are built up from four basic nucleotides. Human genome mapping has shown there are over 3 billion base pairs in our DNA. It is estimated they contain some 20,000 protein-coding genes. All body functions are controlled by the expression of the genes in our genome. The mechanisms controlling the aging process are believed to be programmed into our DNA but only a fraction of the biochemical reactions related to the aging process have been looked at in any detail. Cellular aging is a very complex process and many of its low level operating details have yet to be discovered.

Anti-aging theory has consolidated itself along two lines of thought: the programmed cellular death theory and the cellular damages theory. The programmed death theory focuses on the root causes of aging. The cellular damages theory looks at the visible aspects of aging; i.e. the symptoms of aging. Both theories are correct and often overlap. Both theories are developing rapidly as anti-aging research uncovers more details. As works in progress these theories may take years to complete. This broad characterization also applies to the currently available types of anti-aging treatments.

The programmed death theory of aging suggests that biological aging is a programmed process controlled by many life span regulatory mechanisms. They manifest themselves through gene expression. Gene expression also controls body processes such as our body maintenance (hormones, homeostatic signaling etc.) and repair mechanisms. With increasing age the efficiency of all such regulation declines. Programmed cellular death researchers want to understand which regulatory mechanisms are directly related to aging, and how to affect or improve them. Many ideas are being pursued but one key area of focus is on slowing or stopping telomere shortening. This is considered to be a major cause of aging.

With the exception of the germ cells that produce ova and spermatozoa, most dividing human cell types can only divide about 50 to 80 times (also called the Hayflick limit or biological death clock). This is a direct consequence of all cell types having fixed length telomere chains at the ends of their chromosomes. This is true for all animal (Eukaryotic) cells. Telomeres play a vital role in cell division. In very young adults telomere chains are about 8,000 base pairs long. Each time a cell divides its telomere chain loses about 50 to 100 base pairs. Eventually this shortening process distorts the telomere chain’s shape and it becomes dysfunctional. Cell division is then no longer possible.

Telomerase, the enzyme that builds the fixed length telomere chains, is normally only active in young undifferentiated embryonic cells. Through the process of differentiation these cells eventually form the specialized cells from which of all our organs and tissues are made of. After a cell is specialized telomerase activity stops. Normal adult human tissues have little or no detectable telomerase activity. Why? A limited length telomere chain maintains chromosomal integrity. This preserves the species more than the individual.

During the first months of development embryonic cells organize into about 100 distinct specialized cell lines. Each cell line (and the organs they make up) has a different Hayflick limit. Some cell lines are more vulnerable to the effects of aging than others. In the heart and parts of the brain cell loss is not replenished. With advancing age such tissues start to fail. In other tissues damaged cells die off and are replaced by new cells that have shorter telomere chains. Cell division itself only causes about 20 telomere base pairs to be lost. The rest of the telomere shortening is believed to be due to free radical damage.

This limit on cell division is the reason why efficient cell repair can’t go on indefinitely. When we are 20 to 35 years of age our cells can renew themselves almost perfectly. One study found that at the age 20 the average length of telomere chains in white blood cells is about 7,500 base pairs. In humans, skeletal muscle telomere chain lengths remain more or less constant from the early twenties to mid seventies. By the age of 80 the average telomere length decreases to about 6,000 base pairs. Different studies have different estimates of how telomere length varies with age but the consensus is that between the age of 20 and 80 the length of the telomere chain decreases by 1000 to 1500 base pairs. Afterwards, as telomere lengths shorten even more, signs of severe aging begin to appear.

There are genetic variations in human telomerase. Long lived Ashkenazi Jews are said to have a more active form of telomerase and longer than normal telomere chains. Many other genetic differences (ex.: efficiency of DNA repair, antioxidant enzymes, and rates of free radical production) affect how quickly one ages. Statistics suggest that having shorter telomeres increases your chance of dying. People whose telomeres are 10% shorter than average, and people whose telomeres are 10% longer than average die at different rates. Those with the shorter telomeres die at a rate that is 1.4 greater than those with the longer telomeres.

Many advances in telomerase based anti-aging treatments have been documented. I only have room to mention a few of them.

– Telomerase has been used successfully to lengthen the life of certain mice by up to 24%.

– In humans, gene therapy using telomerase has been used to treat myocardial infarction and several other conditions.

– Telomerase related, mTERT, treatment has successfully rejuvenated many different cell lines.

In one particularly important example researchers using synthetic telomerase that encoded to a telomere-extending protein, have extended the telomere chain lengths of cultured human skin and muscle cells by up to 1000 base pairs. This is a 10%+ extension of telomere chain length. The treated cells then showed signs of being much younger than the untreated cells. After the treatments these cells behaved normally, losing a part of their telomere chain after each division.

The implications of successfully applying such techniques in humans are staggering. If telomere length is a primary cause of normal aging, then, using the telomere length numbers previously mentioned, it might be possible to double the healthy time period during which telomere chain lengths are constant; i.e. from the range of 23 to 74 years to an extended range of 23 to 120 or more years. Of course this is too optimistic because it is known that in vitro cultured cells are able to divide a larger number of times than cells in the human body but it is reasonable to expect some improvement (not 50 years but say 25 years).

We know that telomerase based treatments are not the final answer to anti-aging but there is no doubt that they can, by increasing the Hayflick limit, extend or even immortalize the lifespan of many cell types. It remains to be seen if this can be done safely done in humans.

Telomerase based treatments are only a partial answer to anti-aging. Please carefully research any anti-aging supplements based on this line of treatment. Through my articles and website I want to help you maintain your good health for the next 10 to 25 years. My hope is that within time period the fruits of anti-aging research will become available to everyone.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9227048

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events, Press-Media Releases 

City of Las Vegas Cultural Arts March 2013 Calendar Of Events

495 S. Main St., Las Vegas, NV 89101
Contact: Margaret Kurtz, (702) 229-6993 Feb. 11, 2013
Cultural Arts & Community Events programs: www.artslasvegas.org
City of Las Vegas website: www.lasvegasnevada.gov

PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Spring Class Registration at Charleston Heights Arts Center (ages 2-adult)
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
March 1-April 3 registration for 7- to 8-week session of classes April 3-May 24.
Offered courses include ballet, jazz, hip hop, ballroom dancing, visual arts and private lessons in music and dance by appointment. For more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org. Register for classes at www.artslasvegas.org/classes/register.htm beginning March 1.

Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Spring Drama Class Registration (ages 4-17)
Registration Opens March 1 for 7-week class sessions that begin the week of April 3.
Cost: Fees range from $49 to $70.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
To register or for more information, call (702) 229-6553 or 229-6383, or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Ethnic Express International Folk Dancing (ages 8+)
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:45 p.m.
Admission: $4 dollars per person per week at the door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Have an evening of fun learning international dance styles, including Arabic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Greek, Israeli, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian and Turkish folk dances. No need to bring a partner. For more information, call (702) 656-9513 or go online to www.ethnicexpresslasvegas.org.

Scottish Country Dancing (ages 13+)
Fridays, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Admission: $5 per person at the door; $4 for members of Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Scottish country dancing celebrates the beautiful ballroom dance styles of Scotland. Dances can be joyfully energetic or graceful. From the first chord to the final bow or curtsey, participants will be inspired by the driving reels, jigs, strathspeys or lilting airs. Dancers should wear comfortable clothes and soft shoes. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.

Contra Dances (ages 8+)
Saturdays, March 2 and 23. Group lesson 6:30 p.m.; dance 7 to 10 p.m.
Admission: $10 adults; $5 members, students & military; $3 children under 16 & non-dancers; pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dance to a live acoustic band playing joyful fiddle tunes, driving reels and a waltz or two. All dances are taught and called; newcomers and families welcome. No need to bring a partner. Wear comfortable flat-soled shoes and casual clothing. Presented by the Southern Nevada Old Time Contra Dancers, a nonprofit volunteer organization. For more information, call 656-9513 or go online to www.lasvegascountrydance.org.
Rainbow Company Youth Theatre Auditions for “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale”
Saturday, March 2, 2013, 1 p.m.
No fee to audition.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Auditions for the Rainbow Company musical production of “Rapunzel! Rapunzel! A Very Hairy Fairy Tale” will start promptly at 1 p.m. Roles are available for ages 12 through adult. Comfortable clothes that allow for movement should be worn and a prepared song is strongly recommended. The show will be performed April 26-May 5. For more information, call 229-6553.

“The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” presented by Target and ArtsPower (all ages)
Saturday, March 9, 10:30 a.m.
Cost: $3 general admission.
Historic Fifth Street School Auditorium, 401 S. 4th Street, 229-3515.
ArtsPower’s “The Little Engine That Could™ Earns Her Whistle” tells the uplifting story of an ordinary train that performs an extraordinary feat of strength and courage. The story follows the adventures of The Little Blue Engine, who dreams of someday pulling the Piney Vale Ex¬press just like her best friend Rusty. For tickets and information, call 229-3515 or 229-6469 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

USA Ballroom Dance (ages 13+)
Saturday, March 9, 7 to 11 p.m. Dance lesson at 7:30 p.m.
Admission: $5 members, military and students ages 13-25; $10 for non-members. Pay at door.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St. (702) 229-6383.
Presented by USA Dance Las Vegas Chapter #4038, a local chapter of the national volunteer organization, dedicated to the promotion of ballroom dancing. For more information, call (702) 813-6694 or go online to www.usadancelasvegas.org.

Downtown Cultural Series – Bill & Kate Isles Concert (all ages)
Friday, March 15, noon to 1 p.m.
Free and open to the public.
Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 333 Las Vegas Blvd. South.
Bring your lunch to enjoy a concert by Bill and Kate Isles, an acoustic singer/songwriter duo based in Duluth, Minn. They tour nationally, entertaining audiences with a wide variety of musical styles, catchy melodies and memorable songs. For more information, visit www.billandkateisles.com or www.artslasvegas.org, or call (702) 229-3515.

Poets’ Corner
Friday, March 15, 7 p.m.
Admission is free.
West Las Vegas Arts Center Community Gallery, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Hosted by Keith Brantley, this monthly forum for established poets and open-mic participants features the best local poetry talent.

St. Patrick’s Day Dance (adults)
Saturday, March 16, 7 p.m.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission: $10 in advance; $15 event day.
It’s easy to be green! Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day early by dancing to songs from the 1940s- 70s, from swing and foxtrots to Latin and jazz, performed by the Carl Grove Combo.
For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Women and Young Women’s Conference 2013 (ages 14+)
“The Spirit Of A Woman…Body & Soul”
Saturday, March 23, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Admission is free, but advance registration is required. Call (702) 229-4800 to register.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This dynamic event will promote personal empowerment and mentorship, with a focus on sisterhood. The purpose of the event is to strengthen communication between women and young women, creating and enhancing opportunities for understanding. A series of specialized workshops will be offered throughout the day to benefit and assist women as they share, teach, and learn from each other. Participants are asked to wear comfortable active wear for the workshops. Each adult participant is encouraged to bring a young lady or mentee of high school age, friend, mom, sister, or aunt to the event. The event is cosponsored by the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District.

Spring II Class Registration at the West Las Vegas Arts Center (all ages)
March 23-April 6 registration for 6-week session of classes April 10-May 18.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Cultural arts classes include African Drum; African Dance for Children and African Dance for Teens/Adults; Keep it Moving…Ballet & Tap; Ballet–Beginner/Intermediate; Modern Dance; Hip Hop; Zumba; Tae Kwon Do; Video & Documentary Creation; Music Production; Arts & Crafts – Kids Create and Craft It Up; and Private Piano/Voice lessons. To register, or for more information, call (702) 229-4800 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Folk Celebration and Stage Performance (all ages)
Saturday, March 23, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Admission: $10.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Admission includes a 2 p.m. theatre concert performance in the Jeanne Roberts Theatre, featuring international dance artist “Zarnia,” who specializes in Middle Eastern dances with elaborate costuming, musician RJ Fox playing Flamenco-style guitar accompanied by flamenco dancers, and talented Las Vegas Kaminari Taiko Drummers, a performance group affiliated with the Japanese American Citizens League. View demonstrations and information 12:30-1:45 p.m., take dance lessons 3:30-6:30 p.m. A concert ticket stub will provide half off admission to the Contra Dance at 6:30 p.m. A food vendor will be on site from 12:30 to 6 p.m. This event coincides with the 2013 National Folk Organization’s Las Vegas conference. For tickets or information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

Rainbow Company Spring Break Drama Workshop (grades 2-6)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Cost: $135. Advance registration is required.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Students will enjoy five full days of drama, with a performance on the main stage Saturday, March 30. For information and registration, call 229-6553 or 229-6383 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

Spring Break Dance Camp (ages 12-18)
Monday-Friday, March 25-29, 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $75. Advance registration is required. Registration opened Feb. 1.
Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
Dedicated young dancers will flourish within this weeklong intensive and disciplined atmosphere available to intermediate- and advanced-level students (or students with a minimum of one year of dance instruction). Instruction led by Jackie Koenig and Jennifer Kidder. Dance attire required; please bring snacks. A student demonstration for family and friends at 6:30 p.m. Friday will conclude the camp. To register or more information, call (702) 229-6383 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.
Spring Break Arts Workshop (ages 10-18)
Wednesday-Friday, March 27-29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission is free, but advanced registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
This will be a heritage development workshop, exploring traditions and discovering individualities. Call (702) 229-4800 for information and registration.

Life Skills & Job Readiness Workshop (ages 14-19)
Saturday, March 30, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Admission is free, but registration is required.
West Las Vegas Arts Center, 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., (702) 229-4800.
Life Skills Training is a dynamic, skills-based program that promotes health and personal development. It is designed for those facing the new roles and responsibilities of becoming young adults transitioning into the workplace. The workshop focuses on goal setting, communication, decision making, risk, and maintaining relationships. The program is cosponsored by Nevada Partners. For more information and registration, call (702) 924-2134.
Exhibitions

“Narratives of Progress”
Artist Armin Mühsam
Through March 16, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
About his work, Mühsam says, “My work focuses on the relationship between the natural and the human-built. I imagine the land after technology has rendered it nearly uninhabitable, despite its promises to create a better world. I paint the absence of humans but not of humanity — man-made, sterile landscapes after the disappearance of the natural.” For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“African-American Heritage”
Artist Lolita Develay
Through April 18, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery, 495 S. Main St., Second floor, (702) 229-1012.
Lolita Develay is a 2014 Master of Fine Arts candidate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She lived in Hollywood, Calif., prior to moving to Las Vegas in 2008. Her works are well painted surfaces which reflect her interest in traditions of realism, often focusing on the intrigue of light acting on an object. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

“Sculptures in Glass”
Artists Larry Domsky and Barbara Domsky
Feb. 26-May 30, Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed holidays.
Free admission and open to the public.
Las Vegas City Hall Grand Gallery, 495 S. Main St., First floor, (702) 229-1012.
Glassworks designed and created by this husband-and-wife team will be displayed. The work will include newer pieces that fit the format and space of City Hall as well as pieces from their collection of glassworks. For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.
Nevada Watercolor Society’s 2013 Signature Members’ Exhibit
Feb. 28-March 23, during the reception and by appointment.
Artists’ reception Feb. 28, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information about the city gallery programs, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org. More information about the Nevada Watercolor Society can be found at www.nvws.org/.

“Spirit Journeys”
Artist Rainer Bertrams
March 21-May 4, Wednesday-Friday, 12:30 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Artist’s reception March 21, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free admission and open to the public.
Charleston Heights Art Center, 800 S Brush St., (702) 229-6383.
The images will focus on meditative subjects and themes that explore human kind’s existential struggles for a universal understanding of human nature. For questions about this exhibit or the gallery program, call 229-1012 or visit www.artslasvegas.org.

“Equinox”
March 28-June 8, during reception and by appointment only.
Artists’ reception March 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Admission is free.
Historic Fifth Street School, Mayor’s Gallery, 401 S. Fourth St.
For more information, call 229-1012 or go online to www.artslasvegas.org.

No more “empty nest”: middle-aged adults face family pressure on both sides

February 16, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Articles, Press-Media Releases 

The “empty nest” of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that’s full – kids who can’t leave, can’t find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before.

According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.

An economic recession and tough job market has made it hard on young adults to start their careers and families. At the same time, many older people are living longer, which adds new and unanticipated needs that their children often must step up to assist with.
The end result, researchers suggest, are “empty nest” plans that often have to be put on hold, and a mixed bag of emotions, ranging from joy and “happy-to-help” to uncertainty, frustration and exhaustion.

“We mostly found very positive feelings about adults helping their children in the emerging adulthood stage of life, from around ages 18 to 30,” said Karen Hooker, director of the OSU Center for Healthy Aging Research.

“Feelings about helping parents weren’t so much negative as just filled with more angst and uncertainty,” Hooker said. “As a society we still don’t socialize people to expect to be taking on a parent-caring role, even though most of us will at some point in our lives. The average middle-aged couple has more parents than children.”

The findings of this research were just published in the Journal of Aging Studies, and were based on data from six focus groups during 2009-10. It was one of the first studies of its type to look at how middle-aged adults actually feel about these changing trends.
Various social, economic, and cultural forces have combined to radically challenge the traditional concept of an empty nest, the scientists said. The recession that began in 2008 yielded record unemployment, substantial stock market losses, lower home values and increased demand for higher levels of education.

Around the same time, advances in health care and life expectancy have made it possible for many adults to live far longer than they used to – although not always in good health, and often needing extensive care or assistance.

This study concluded that most middle-aged parents with young adult children are fairly happy to help them out, and they understand that getting started in life is simply more difficult now. Some research has suggested that age 25 is the new 22; that substantially more parents now don’t even expect their kids to be financially independent in their early 20s, and don’t mind helping them through some difficult times.

But the response to helping adult parents who, at the same time, need increasing amounts of assistance is not as uniformly positive, the study found – it can be seen as both a joy and a burden, and in any case was not something most middle-aged adults anticipated.

“With the kids, it’s easy,” is a general purpose reaction. With aging parents, it isn’t.

“My grandparents died younger, so my parents didn’t cope with another generation,” one study participant said.

Many middle-aged people said it was difficult to make any plans, due to disruptions and uncertainty about a parent’s health at any point in time. And most said they we’re willing to help their aging parents, but a sense of being time-starved was a frequent theme.
“It brings my heart joy to be able to provide for my mom this way,” one study participant said. “There are times when it’s a burden and I feel resentful.”

The dual demands of children still transitioning to independence, and aging parents who need increasing amounts of care is causing many of the study participants to re-evaluate their own lives. Some say they want to make better plans for their future so they don’t pose such a burden to their children, and begin researching long-term care insurance. Soul-searching is apparent.

“I don’t care if I get old,” a participant said. “I just don’t want to become debilitated. So I would rather have a shorter life and a healthy life than a long life like my mom, where she doesn’t have a life. She doesn’t have memories. Our memories are what make us who we are.”

An increasing awareness of the challenges produced by these new life stages may cause more individuals to anticipate their own needs, make more concrete plans for the future, reduce ambivalent approaches and have more conversations with families about their own late-life care, the researchers said in their study.
About the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences: The College creates connections in teaching, research and community outreach while advancing knowledge, policies and practices that improve population health in communities across Oregon and beyond.

Nevada-Senior-Guide Health Care Partners Medical Group

August 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Health and Home Care, Las Vegas 

facebook.com/healthcarepartnersnevada

About Us

HealthCare Partners Nevada is a network of more than 200 primary care physicians and more than 1,300 specialists. With medical clinics and specialty care affiliates throughout Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City and Pahrump, HealthCare Partners Nevada (HCPNV) is committed to delivering the highest quality of care to all our patients.
Through our total care model, HealthCare Partners provides patient centered comprehensive primary care, specialty, and urgent care services. Founded in 1996, HealthCare Partners Nevada is an affiliate of HealthCare Partners LLC with offices in California, Florida and Nevada.

For Patients

At HealthCare Partners we approach your health with Total Care. Our mission is to deliver the highest quality care to all our patients. We do this by offering you complete access to our services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We also accommodate same-day appointments.
Our health care providers are ready and able to offer expert care when you need it most. While our mission is to deliver the best possible care for our patients, our promise is to provide the personal attention you deserve. It is our pleasure to ensure your individual healthcare needs are met.

Specialty Services

When you choose HealthCare Partners, you are choosing to manage your health through what we call our Total Care Model.  Total care means that you are actively involved with a team of healthcare professionals lead by your primary care physician who is responsible for coordinating your care and ensuring the best outcome possible for your medical needs.
HealthCare Partners is continually adding medical specialties to our team of healthcare professionals, including cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, internal medicine, pediatrics, and podiatry.

Cardiology

Cardiologists are doctors with special training and skill in finding, treating and preventing diseases of the heart and blood vessels.
Click here to find a HealthCare Partners Medical Group cardiologists.

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Repair
  • Angioplasty
  • Atrial Fibrillation Management
  • Cardiac Catheterization /Angiography
  • Cardiovascular Disease Management
  • Carotid Ultrasonography
  • Catheter Ablation (CA)
  • Cholesterol Management And Testing
  • Coagulation Monitoring
  • Coronary Angioplasty/Stenting
  • Doppler Ultrasound
  • Echocardiography (Echo)
  • Electrophysiological Studies (EPS)
  • Gated Blood Pooling Imaging
  • Heart Rhythm Management
  • Holter/Event Monitoring
  • Implantable Cardioverter /Defribrillator (ICD)
  • Laser Lead Extractions
  • Nuclear Cardiac Imaging
  • Patent Foramen Ovale Repair (PFO)
  • Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Rotational Atherectomy (PCTRA)
  • Peripheral Vascular Disease Management And Testing
  • Peripheral Vascular Interventions
  • Permanent Pacemaker Implantation
  • Stress Testing
  • Structural Heart Disease
  • T-Wave Alternans
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)
  • Transesophageal Echocardiography
  • Ventricular Septal Defect Repair (VSD)
  • Women And Heart Disease
Endocrinology

Endocrinologists are doctors that focus on the medical aspects of hormones and their associated diseases and conditions.  Endocrine disorders may include: cholesterol disorders, coronary artery disease, diabetes, hormone replacement therapy, hypertension, hypoglycemia, obesity, osteoporosis, reproductive medicine and thyroid disorders.

Dermatology

Dermatologists are doctors that specialize in the diagnosis, treatment and management of disorders of the skin, hair and nails.

Internal Medicine

Internal medicine specialists are doctors that focus on adult medicine and have had special study and training focusing on the prevention and treatment of adult diseases. Internists are sometimes referred to as the “doctor’s doctor”, because they are often called upon to act as consultants to other physicians to help solve puzzling diagnostic problems.

Pediatrics

Pediatricians are doctors that focus on babies, children, adolescents, and young adults from birth to age 21.  Pediatricians manage the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of their patients in every stage of development.

Podiatry

Podiatrists are doctors that diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and related structures of the leg.

  • Senior Industry Network Group Events

    Monthly SING Meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at our NEW location below:

    Desert Canyon - HealthSouth
    9175 W. Oquendo Rd.
    Las Vegas, NV 89148

    S.I.N.G. Agenda:
    - Coffee and bagels will be served
    - A time to show gratitude by thanking those who have sent you referrals
    - Announcements around the room
    - One minute commercials
    - Open Discussion on topics of Self Empowerment

    * When? The 1st Thursday of every month. Networking starts at: 8:00am | Meeting starts at: 8:30am

    * How Much? It’s free!